first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportAlaska Gov. Bill Walker’s efforts to get a personal income tax enacted during the General Assembly’s 2016 regular (TAXDAY, 2016/01/22, S.3 ) and five special sessions (TAXDAY, 2016/06/03, S.1 ) ended without any legislative action on his proposals.H.B. 5003e, failed to pass the Alaska State Legislature by adjournment on July 18, 2016last_img

first_imgFor Oregon property tax purposes, the exemption for property consisting of solar, geothermal, wind, water, or methane gas systems is not allowed for tax years beginning after July 1, 2023. Formerly, the law was not allowed for tax years beginning after July 1, 2017.Ch. 542 (H.B. 2760), effective 91 days following adjournment sine dielast_img

first_imgThe House Ways and Means Committee is scheduled to release draft tax reform legislation on November 1 with a markup beginning one week later on November 6 (TAXDAY, 2017/10/27, C.1 ). The markup is expected to go on for several days, ensuring Democratic lawmakers have “ample time” to weigh-in on the policy proposals in the legislation, according to Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Tex. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., has indicated a Thanksgiving deadline for moving legislation through the House.The Senate is reportedly gearing up to release its own tax reform legislation in the coming days. The Senate Finance Committee (SFC) will mark up its tax reform bill the week of November 13, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Tex., told reporters. “We need to get the tax bill out of the Senate before Thanksgiving,” he said. Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., also confirmed on October 26 that Senate Republicans are looking to pass tax reform legislation by Thanksgiving. Under that schedule, House and Senate leadership will likely then move both bills to conference committee negotiation, where members and the Trump administration will try to agree on final bill language, for a vote by the House and the Senate before Christmas recess.Several Democrats, including SFC ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., have been critical of the pace with which Republicans are moving forward on tax reform. “They are rushing their tax giveaway to big corporations and the wealthy through the Congress so quickly that nobody catches on,” Wyden said on the Senate floor on October 26.Child Tax CreditMeanwhile, two Senate Democrats are focused on expanding the Child Tax Credit. Sens. Michael F. Bennet, D-Colo., and Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, introduced the American Family Bill of 2017 on October 26. “The bill would create a new $300-per-month, per-child credit for children under 6 years of age and a $250-per-month, per-child credit for children 6 to 18 years of age—therefore, at least tripling the credit (now at $1,000 per year) for all children and, for the first time, making the credit fully refundable,” according to Bennet’s press release.The White House has also been promoting an expanded Child Tax Credit. Ivanka Trump, a senior advisor to President Trump, has been meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on Capitol Hill over the last several days to rally support for the expansion. The Trump/GOP Tax Reform Framework released in September calls for “significantly” increasing the credit (TAXDAY, 2017/09/28, C.1 ).By Jessica Jeane, Wolters Kluwer News StaffLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_imgThe Maine Senate introduced a bill that would update Maine’s Internal Revenue Code (IRC) conformity date to December 31, 2017. The change would apply to tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2017.  The current conformity date is December 31, 2016.IRC conformity applies to corporate and personal income tax rules.S.P. 612, introduced in the Maine Senate on November 27, 2017Minnesota recently enacted IRC conformity legislation.Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_img This weekend, American Dreaming Magazine’s Pop Up Food Court returns for another round of delicious madness. Philly’s top food vendors wil be on the scene with an amazing selection of delectable treats. From fancy burgers and dogs to tasty ice cream, ‘tots and more—the hardest part will be deciding where to start, and when to stop. Event Details American Dreaming: Pop-Up Food Court When: Saturday, December 23, 2 – 8 p.m. Where: The Dreaming Building, 618 N. Front Street Cost: Free More Info: RSVP here American Dreaming: Pop Up Food Courtlast_img read more

first_img(AP) – A redacted version of the special counsel’s report on Russian election interference and the Trump campaign is stirring controversy even before its release.Democrats say a news conference ahead of the redacted report’s release on Thursday allows Attorney General William Barr to spin its contents before lawmakers and the public have a chance to read it.The nearly 400-page report is expected to reveal what special counsel Robert Mueller uncovered about ties between the Trump campaign and Russia that fell short of criminal conduct.Democrats have vowed to fight in court for the disclosure of additional information from the report. They are expected to seize on any negative portrait of the president to demand the release of the full report.last_img read more

first_imgA group of Missouri senators started filibustering Monday afternoon, and continued into Tuesday, over a potential incentives package for General Motors. That filibuster has now ended.Columbia Sen. Caleb Rowden joined Wake Up Columbia on Tuesday morning:(This story was last updated at 5:58 a.m. Wednesday.)last_img

first_imgJEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – Missouri utility regulators have approved the acquisition of a large wind energy project by a Chicago firm.The decision Wednesday by the state Public Service Commission was a necessary step for Invenergy to buy the rights to construct the proposed Grain Belt Express power line.The project initiated by Houston-based Clean Line Energy Partners would carry Kansas wind energy on a 780-mile (1,255-kilometer) path across Missouri and Illinois before hooking into an electric grid in Indiana that serves eastern states.Missouri regulators earlier this year reversed their previous denials and gave the green light to the project. Missouri legislators then tried but failed to prohibit eminent domain for the project.But the project still needs regulatory approval in Illinois, where an appeals court last year overturned the state’s previous approval. Invenergy’s acquisition also needs approval in Kansas.last_img read more

first_imgThe only death over the weekend at the Lake of the Ozarks happened late Sunday night.The Highway Patrol says David Crouse swam after a boat that drifted away at the 56 mile marker on the Osage Arm of the lake and drowned at about 9:30 p.m.The Stover man was 57 years old.Troopers worked 376 traffic crashes statewide during the Fourth of July holiday counting period, which ran from the evening of July 3 through July 7. There were 139 injuries and nine fatalities on the roads. It appears no one died in boating accidents, but there were three drownings.(This story was last updated at 10:49 a.m. Monday.)last_img read more

first_img(Missourinet) Every available Missouri state trooper is on the road and water on Friday and will be throughout the Labor Day holiday weekend.Missouri State Highway Patrol Sergeant Scott White says 11 motorists were killed and another 470 were injured in Missouri traffic crashes during the 2018 Labor Day holiday.“We worked almost 1,100 crashes last year during the Labor Day holiday and we arrested 113 people for driving while intoxicated,” White says.Sergeant White tells Missourinet troopers are participating in Operation C.A.R.E. this Labor Day holiday weekend. That stands for crash awareness and reduction effort.“And we know that the peak travel days are going to be Friday and Monday,” says White. “And what that means is we’re going to have as many troopers out there as possible enforcing the speed limit laws, seat belt, impaired driving laws.”Troopers will also be assisting motorists throughout the holiday weekend.Meantime, every available Missouri state trooper from the marine division will be on the water throughout the entire Labor Day holiday weekend. White says troopers worked seven boating crashes during the 2018 holiday. None of them involved fatalities.“All of our marine enforcement troopers will be out there working the waterways,” White says. “And what that means is they’ll be working extended shifts, they’ll be working 10 to 12-hour shifts to make sure that they’re out there.”White says people tend to be safer when they see state troopers in boats. He urges boaters to check their vessel’s navigation lights and to have spare bulbs on board.He’s also urging boaters to wear a life jacket and to avoid alcohol. State troopers made 15 arrests for boating while intoxicated during the 2018 holiday.last_img read more

first_imgIt’s still illegal to grow marijuana in Missouri…especially if you don’t own the land where you plant the pot.Audrain County authorities this week charged three men with drug manufacturing and trespassing.Investigators found the grow operations in rural areas north of Centralia and southeast of Laddonia.The suspects are 57-year-old Lindall Keeter and 67-year-old Maurice Nolan of Auxvasse, and 69-year-old Robert Haynes of Mexico.last_img

first_imgThe mobile middleware server handles system integration, security, communications, scalability, and cross-platform support.The mobile client application connects to the middleware server and drives both the user interface and the business logic on the device and supports many operating systems and devices.We believe as more HTML5 and library-enabled code modules are developed in our environment, the need for the MEAP might diminish, although we see it as being absorbed, not eliminated.For more information about our efforts, read IT@Intel’s recent white paper, “Delivering Cloud-based Services in a Bring-Your-Own Environment.” Here at Intel, we are actively integrating employee-owned devices—including smartphones, tablets, and PCs—into our enterprise environment. In addition, we now deliver 80 percent of our newly developed business services through our own enterprise private cloud. We plan to increasingly use a mix of private and public cloud-based services, called hybrid cloud, in implementing solutions over the next few years.In my role as IT Chief Technology Officer, I have observed parallels and interdependencies between our adoption of IT consumerization, which provides employees with a wider range of choices for compute capability, and the advent of cloud computing, which offers businesses additional options for IT services. Intel IT is coordinating our cloud computing efforts with our bring-your-own-device (BYOD) initiatives, to enable us to reap maximum business value from both.We feel that both cloud computing and BYOD are important enablers for our agility and enterprise velocity. But historically, application development has been a rigid process that can slow agility, especially in the areas of larger enterprise systems such as ERP. To increase our ability to develop applications and deliver services quickly—and to a wide range of devices—we are implementing a pace-layered approach utilizing a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to help us abstract away our slower-to-evolve applications, such as our ERP system, from our quicker-moving capabilities, such as new supply chains to support new business. By being able to connect existing services faster, it also allows us to implement better capabilities such as transforming our shopping carts into purchase orders.This pace-layered approach matches the pace the platform needs to evolve with the pace the business needs to move by abstracting the front-end functionality away from the back-end systems. For example, a service may rely on data stored in our ERP system, but to deliver the service to a tablet, we need to develop a new user interface (UI). By abstracting the front end from the back end, we can quickly develop the UI without having to disturb the underlying data structures and associated business rules.We have also implemented a Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP), to help us use SOA more efficiently with mobile devices. A MEAP is a comprehensive suite of products and services that can help reduce complexity and connectivity problems associated with deploying an application across multiple devices. In general, a MEAP-based solution consists of two components.last_img read more

first_imgIn Pt1 of this blog post I looked at a SQL Query and data set to run in Hadoop and in Pt2 wrote the Map function to extract the relevant fields from the data set to satisfy the query. At this point however we still have not implemented any of the aggregate functions and still have a large key and value intermediate data set. The only data eliminated so far has been the lines examined where the date was not less than or equal to 11-AUG-98. On the test data set out of the initial 600037902 lines of data we now have 586996074 lines remaining, to complete the query we now need to write the reduce phase. The Reduce method will extend the Reducer class. This needs to accept the intermediate key value pairs output by the mapper and therefore will receive as input the key which is fields 9 and 10  concatenated and the DoubleArrayWritable containing the values. For every key we need to iterate through the values and calcuate the totals required for the SUM(), AVG() and COUNT() functions. Once these have been calculated we can format the output as text to be written to a file that will give us exactly the same result as if the query had been processed by a relational database. This reduce phase will look something as follows by simply adding all of the values in the array for the SUM() functions and then dividing by the COUNT() value to calculate the result of the AVG() functions.nfor (DoubleArrayWritable val : values) {x = (DoubleWritable[]) val.toArray();sum_qty += x[0].get();sum_base_price += x[1].get();sum_discount += x[2].get();count_star += x[3].get();sum_disc_price += x[4].get();sum_charge += x[5].get();        }avg_qty = sum_qty/count_star;avg_price = sum_base_price/count_star;avg_disc = sum_discount/count_star;/* Format and collect the output */Text tpchq1redval = new Text(” “+sum_qty+” “+sum_base_price+” “+sum_disc_price+” “+sum_charge+” “+avg_qty+” “+avg_price+” “+avg_disc+” “+count_star);       context.write(key, tpchq1redval);       }  }nCoupled with the Map phase and a Job Control section (this will be covered in the next post on running the job) this Job is now ready to run. However as we have noted previously just for our 100GB data set the map phase will output over 58 million lines of data which will involve a lot of network traffic and disk writes. We can make this more efficient by writing a Combiner.The Combiner also extends the Reducer and in simple cases but not all (as we will cover in a moment) can be exactly the same as the Reducer. The aim of the combiner is to perform a Reducer type operation on the subset of data produced by each Mapper which will then minimise the amount of data that needs to be transferred throughout the cluster from Map to Reduce. The single most important thing about the Combiner is that there is no certainty that it will run. It is available as an optimization but for a particular Map output it might not run at all and there is no way to force it to run. From a development perspective this has important consequences, you should be able to comment out the line in the Job Control section that calls the Combiner and the result produced by the MapReduce Job stays exactly the same. Additionally the input fields for the Combiner must be exactly the same as expected by the Reducer to operate on the Map output and the Combiner output must also correspond to the input expected by the Reducer.  If you Combiner does not adhere to these restrictions your job may compile and run and you will not receive an error, however if not implemented correctly your results may change on each run from additional factors such as changing the imput block size. Finally the Combiner operation must be both commutative and associative. In other words the Combiner operation must ensure that both changing the order of the operands as well as the grouping of the operations you perform does not change the result. In our example the SUM() function is both commutative and associative, the numbers can be summed in any order and we can perform the sum operation on different groups and the result will always remain the same. AVG() on the other hand is commutative but not associative. We can calculate the average with the input data in any order, however we cannot take an average of smaller groups of values and then take the average of this intermediate data and expect the result to be the same. For this reason the Combiner can perform the SUM() operation but not the AVG() and can look as follows producing the intermediate sum values only for the Reducer.nfor (DoubleArrayWritable val : values) { x = (DoubleWritable[]) val.toArray();sum_qty += x[0].get();sum_base_price += x[1].get();sum_discount += x[2].get();count_star += x[3].get();sum_disc_price += x[4].get();sum_charge += x[5].get();  }outArray[0] = new DoubleWritable(sum_qty); outArray[1] = new DoubleWritable(sum_base_price); outArray[2] = new DoubleWritable(sum_discount); outArray[3] = new DoubleWritable(count_star); outArray[4] = new DoubleWritable(sum_disc_price);outArray[5] = new DoubleWritable(sum_charge);DoubleArrayWritable da = new DoubleArrayWritable();da.set(outArray);context.write(key, da);     }  nAt this stage we have written the Mapper, Reducer and Combiner and in Pt4 will look at adding the Job Control section to produce the completed MapReduce job. We will then consider compiling and running the job and tuning for performance.last_img read more

first_imgBlue Line Contractors Ltd. is a Toronto-area general contractor specializing in commercial and residential renovations that require expertise in structural modifications or complex building changes.Blue Line’s president, Silvio Santos, didn’t have the budget to hire an IT expert. But he knew the way they worked needed an overhaul, as he “would be on the phone from 6 to 10 or 11 every night organizing crews, organizing clients, and scheduling meetings.”The biggest issue for Blue Line was that their old system didn’t support remote access. That meant the team couldn’t collaborate seamlessly between the office and the site. It meant scheduling had to happen over the phone in the evening. And it meant Santos couldn’t take time off. “I used to go 24/7,” Santos says, “And I just don’t have that in me anymore.” Big Changes on a Small BudgetFor Santos, the only choice for the hardware refresh was Intel: “They have the reputation and have been around a long time. I’ve never had issues with Intel processors so I always stick with Intel.”Santos replaced his six-year-old PC fleet with a Lenovo ThinkServer, powered by an Intel Xeon processor E3-1225 v3. Site supervisors received new laptops featuring the Intel Core i5 processor family. All of the hardware was chosen carefully so the team could communicate changes and deal with issues on-the-fly. Schedule or design changes that once threw a wrench in the whole project and considerably slowed down the workday were suddenly no big deal.Santos says that with a new network infrastructure in place, Blue Line has also improved administration with more accurate payroll, and now has the capacity to email invoices and track expenses in real time. He believes these new tools will also help him attract new staff because he can offer more flexible work options. That flexibility extends to Santos himself, too: “I can now take a week off without feeling stressed. It’s a lot easier because I can be in communication and help to address issues quickly.” The New NormalThe day-to-day operations at Blue Line now look completely different. These days, Santos can put a schedule together any time of day and send it out. “If there’s a conflict, I know right away and can modify plans in real time so we don’t have downtime if someone doesn’t show up when they were expected,” he says.Before the refresh, Santos would travel back and forth to client locations to pick up and drop off drawings to quote projects. Today, drawings are emailed to Santos who accesses CAD drawings on his workstation powered by the Intel Xeon processor E5-1630 v3. According to him, “this has been one of the biggest benefits of the new technology.”Reviewing and quoting on large projects used to take two to three weeks to get drawings in for revisions and verification. Add another two weeks for production and six weeks later, they’d be starting installation.“Now, we can get shop drawings for urgent jobs in a day or two, if not same day,” says Santos. “The whole process has streamlined from a month to a day.”Santos estimates his business has grown 30 percent since they started making the investment in new technologies, and he’s projecting a further 30 to 40 percent increase in sales this year — all thanks to the right hardware.Learn more about Blue Line’s refresh process and how the right hardware upgrades could boost your small business. Have you upgraded recently? Comment below, and tell us what’s helped your small business compete! And join us on TwitterOpens in a new window!last_img read more

first_imgChances are, you already use the cloud in some area of your life. Whether it’s storing photos from your phone or listening to streaming music, cloud has quickly become essential to modern life. Yet many small businesses are still using antiquated processes to store and share their files. As digital data grows, those systems are no longer adequate.Benefits of cloud migration can be significant, including lower office expenses and increased efficiency, but there’s a lot of confusion around getting started. Check out the info below to build a strong foundation for your small business cloud.What Is Cloud Storage?The cloud is a network of servers that handles data remotely. A cloud network can store data — like all those images we upload to Facebook — or serve up applications for streaming services like Spotify.The most immediate benefit of using the cloud is easy access. Salesforce sums it up nicely: “Where in the past, people would run applications or programs from software downloaded on a physical computer or server in their building, cloud computing allows people to access the same kinds of applications through the internet.”How Can the Cloud Help Small Business?Storing data in the cloud gives small business employees the ability to work from anywhere. You might be giving a PowerPoint presentation to a potential client downtown while an analyst compiles a weekly report from home and someone in the office enters data. Whatever the scenario, you’re all accessing the same data in real time. The cloud boosts efficiency by keeping all your files in the same place and accessible from anywhere.Not only is that data readily available, but working in the cloud also reduces the need for expensive IT hardware and on-site software. Employees just need a computer to access a variety of services such as video conferencing, mobile and internet convergence, data sharing, integrated messaging, and software that was previously only available with the purchase of a license. Cloud-based software is also constantly updated, so you’re always using the latest version.Another significant benefit of moving small business services to the cloud is the ability to scale. When you need more processing power or data storage, it’s easy to expand without changing hardware — and without the unproductive downtime that usually comes with an IT upgrade.Cloud Options and Where to StartCloud computing has reached a level of maturity that makes it accessible to small business, but the host of options can be overwhelming. Start by researching some of the best cloud services for small businesses. Most fall into categories, so you can choose based on your needs:Communications and commerce-based toolsSecurity and network monitoringFinancial toolsIt’s important to vet cloud service providers before adopting one, just as you would any other service provider. Consider a few key elements when looking for an online storage provider, including proven infrastructure and an active, established user base.When assessing a provider, take a look at the company’s security measures as well. Many small business owners report being concerned about the security of remotely accessed cloud-based systems. However, broad scrutiny, higher standards, and ongoing audits result in a more secure cloud overall. Small businesses can do their part to maintain data security by ensuring tight permissions, and by identifying risks in the office.You can find more tips on cloud adoption — as well as resources specific to small business — by visiting our Small Business Hub. And to join the conversation, be sure to follow @IntelSmallBiz on Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgFrom May 16-18, SAP SAPPHIRE NOW and the ASUG (Americas’ SAP Users’ Group) overtook Orlando with one of the largest global tech conferences of the year. SAPPHIRE NOW is so large because SAP technologies—particularly the SAP HANA in-memory database—are so prominent in global business. SAP is at the center of an ecosystem of technology partners, and has worked closely with Intel for nearly 30 years, particularly in the joint engineering that developed – and continues to extend – the SAP HANA* platform. Intel also had a large presence at the show and we had our own announcements and demos to share in support of the long, rich relationship between Intel and SAP.As I wandered the show floor and marveled at all the technological wonders on display—an eye-popping tableau of robots, drones, and even a virtual wind farm—I had to remind myself that behind all these breakthroughs was SAP, a company not so long ago known mostly for vast and imposing enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Today, SAP straddles the cutting edge of technology, a leader in bringing artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), and machine learning to business.In fact, the longest lines in Orlando (and that’s saying something) were to get into the SAP Leonardo* exhibit. Leonardo is the name given to SAP’s digital innovation system, and is made up of SAP’s technologies for artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, analytics, IoT and blockchain, all of which can be embedded in applications to create new data-driven intelligent systems. If you wonder how these new technologies will apply to your business, just keep your eye on SAP. By transforming itself into a pioneer of applying these advanced technologies to business, SAP continues to position itself as a leader in digital transformation.Intel Executives Star in SAP SAPPHIRE KeynotesDuring Tuesday’s keynote address,Opens in a new window Diane Bryant, president of Intel’s Data Center Group, walked on stage to join Bernd Leukert, a member of SAP’s Executive Board for Products and Innovation. Diane announced the Intel® Xeon® Processor Scalable familyOpens in a new window, a new foundation for secure and agile multi-cloud data centers. The new scalable processors, which will be available in mid-2017, are optimized for SAP HANA and have been benchmarked with performance gains up to 1.59x higher over the previous generation Intel processor family when running in-memory SAP HANA workloads. Additionally, Diane announced that SAP HANA is now certified to support up to six times more memory on the new Intel Xeon processor scalable for four- or eight-socket configurations than the typical four-year-old system in general use today. This makes the new Intel platform ideal to meet the increasingly complex demands of big-data, in-memory workloads in modern data centers.Intel’s Diane Bryant onstage at SAP SAPPHIRE with SAP’s Bernd Leukert, discussing the new Intel Xeon Processor Scalable family.But wait, there’s more. Diane also announced a new generation of Intel dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs) based on 3D XPoint™ technologyOpens in a new window to help overcome the traditional I/O bottlenecks that slow data flows and limit application capacity and performance. Historically, memory has been small, volatile and expensive, but Intel’s new DIMMs with persistent memory, due to launch next year, are about to change that. Intel persistent memory shifts the memory paradigm by putting more data on nonvolatile media closer to the processor, and in a more affordable manner. Not only does larger memory promise faster processing and therefore faster results, it also reduces downtime during outages and restarts because data can persist in-memory.Lisa Davis, Intel’s VP of IT Transformation, presented the first public demo of the new DIMM technology. Watch my Periscope videoOpens in a new window of Lisa’s presentation, showing a prerelease version of an Intel Xeon Scalable platform operating with 192 gigabytes of DRAM and 1.5 terabytes of Intel persistent memory, running a development version of SAP HANA. On a dashboard above the stage, we watched as the platform ran several thousand simultaneous SAP HANA user sessions, displaying how the system used DRAM for operations like inserts and deletes, which require high read/write access, and used Intel persistent memory for capacity and persistence of the main memory fragment. By targeting the right kind of memory to the right kind of operation, Lisa’s demo showed how the new DIMM system is able to handle large data capacity while maintaining high overall performance. This opens the prospect of entire databases remaining permanently in memory for super low latency computing.In-Booth Demos Showcase IoTIntel also hosted a number of demos at its SAP SAPPHIRE booth. Watch my PeriscopeOpens in a new window of an emergency response demonstration using drones, Intel® RealSense™ imaging technologies and SAP Leonardo Edge consoles. The demo shows how imaging technologies can track human activity to provide surveillance and coordinate rescue in disaster scenarios. Read more about the Intel, SAP Leonardo and Wind River Helix* IoT edge management solution hereOpens in a new window.We also demoed SAP HANA Express* Predictive Maintenance and Service (PdMS) on Intel® NUC, which showed how the small form factor NUC computer is able to provide predictive maintenance in an IoT network via VMware and 3DXpoint technologies.Intel also published a use case in conjunction with SAP SAPPHIRE. Read SAP and Intel Co-innovation Enables Global Cloud Migration to the SAP HANA PlatformOpens in a new window to learn how SAP was able to increase workload density and reduce operational costs by porting all its SAP Business ByDesign* customers to a SAP HANA platform powered by the Intel® Xeon® processor E7 v4 family. Remarkably, the migration was implemented with almost no impact on customers’ abilities to operate their businesses without interruption, other than the brief scheduled downtime during non-business weekend hours.Connect with me at @TimIntelOpens in a new window and #TechTim for the latest news on Intel and SAP.last_img read more

first_imgSocial and behavioral research is finally getting some of the high-level attention it has sought for years at the National Institutes of Health. Yesterday NIH Director Francis Collins announced that $10 million in recovery money will go to support the launch of the Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network – they’re calling it OppNet, an initiative to support and coordinate basic behavioral research throughout NIH. The American Psychological Society  Association for Psychological Science (APS), which has been working with Congress for about a decade to get more behavioral science into NIH, is ecstatic about OppNet. APS Executive Director Alan Kraut says NIH’s Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, which isn’t a funding agency, “has had less and less impact over time.” OppNet, to be led by Jeremy Berg, director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, and National Institute on Aging Director Richard Hodes, “is much higher visibility.” It will be getting all institute directors together on a regular basis to talk about behavioral research needs. Although basic behavioral research already gets about $1 billion a year from NIH, Kraut says OppNet will funnel money into cross-disciplinary areas that have hitherto been ignored. NIH institutes and centers have committed to putting another $110 million into the initiative over the next 5 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

first_imgWave and ocean power got a hearing at a subcommittee of the House of Representatives Science and Technology Committee today.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)India has announced it will cut its carbon emissions intensity of its economy by as much as a quarter from 2005 levels by 2020. Starting with this weekend’s games, players in the National Football League who exhibit symptoms of a concussion won’t be allowed to return to the game. The rule change is the latest in a series of measures taken by the league to address concerns about lasting effects of head injuries.The Massachusetts Institute of Technology will be hosting a panel discussion on the Augustine Report on human spaceflight on 11 December.The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee passed nine bills related to conservation today; the timetable for a vote by the full Senate is unclear. Nine democrats have given President Barack Obama a list of demands they want met in Copenhagen at the climate talks: Key among them is a call for verifiable targets from all major economies. The University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom has announced that Muir Russell, a former official of the University of Glasgow, will lead the official investigation into Climategate.(Illustration Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/doegox/ / CC BY-SA 2.0 )last_img read more

first_imgFor the fifth consecutive year, the number of international students applying to U.S. graduate schools has risen. Fueled by a boom in the number of Chinese students earning undergraduate degrees, the trend finally erases a steep drop in 2003-05 that’s generally attributed to tightened visa procedures following the September 2001 terrorist attacks. A new report out today from the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) documents a 7% jump in applicants for the 2010-11 academic year. Students from China led the way, with a 19% jump over 2009 that continues several years of double-digit increases. Applications from Indian students dropped 2%, after a 12% decline in 2009, while the number of applications from South Korean students remained flat, after a 9% drop in 2009. Those three countries are the source of half of all international applicants to U.S. graduate schools. The Middle East and Turkey added to its string of double-digit increases with a 18% boost in 2010, although that region generates only about 6% of all foreign applicants. “China simply cannot keep up with demand,” says Nathan Bell, the council’s research director. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Bell manages the survey of some 505 member institutions (the response rate was 48%). “Other countries are also seeing the impact of China’s tremendous growth in undergraduate education.” The survey, begun in 2004, paints a three-step picture of the graduate enrollment process. Part I covers applications, part II tracks admissions, and part III records who actually shows up for classes. Typically, the change in actual enrollment is roughly half the magnitude of annual changes in applications. But Bell says that he’s reluctant to make any predictions this year because of the uncertainty about the financial aid packages that institutions will be able to offer. The number of applicants increased for all fields of study, led by an 11% jump in psychology and the social sciences. The life sciences trailed the field, with a 3% bump. The 6-year trend varies greatly across the 75 institutions that CGS has tracked since 2004, however. Slightly more than half enjoyed, on average, a 35% increase in applications over the period. The rest suffered an average decline of 25% in applications. In general, large institutions saw a bigger bump in applications this year than did small institutions.last_img read more

first_imgNational Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins today responded to a flap about a psychiatrist who failed to report drug-company income and avoided his university’s punishment by moving to a new university. The incident, Collins says, has exposed gaps in the federal conflict of interest (COI) regulation that NIH hopes to address. Speaking to his advisory board, Collins discussed a story this week in The Chronicle of Higher Education about former Emory University faculty member Charles Nemeroff. After a Senate probe found that Nemeroff failed to report at least $1.2 million in outside income, Emory banned Nemeroff from receiving NIH grants for 2 years in December 2008. But as The Chronicle reported, he was eligible to apply for grants a year later when he took a job at the University of Miami. “The sanctions applied to the institutions and not to the investigator,” Collins explained. The “silver lining to this story,” Collins said, is that “it brought to light NIH grants policies that may need to be addressed.” He said that as part of a revision of the COI rules, NIH is looking into “how can we improve NIH’s ability to make sanctions or penalties continue to apply to individual researchers even if they move to another NIH-funded institution.” NIH is also reviewing its policies for participating in peer review and advisory committees “in circumstances of this sort,” he said. As The Chronicle reported, Nemeroff is serving on two NIH peer-review panels. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more