first_imgMinister of State Joseph Harmon charged 57 graduates of the Youth Leadership Training Programme at theA participant, Melynda Smith models an outfit as part of the activities at the graduation ceremony for her colleaguesMadewini Training Centre to be ‘doers’ and not just talkers for the development of Guyana.The Minister was at the time speaking at the closing ceremony of the first in a series of eight training programmes on Sunday, which will draw on youth leaders from across the country between June and December.“The true demonstration of your effectiveness as youth leaders will be the practical things you get done and the positive tangible things that you achieve through your endeavours. Be doers, not talkers. We have too many talkers in Guyana; people who have the best ideas about everything but they do nothing. Change that paradigm. Become agents of change, become people who do things. Make your communities better, make your regions better and ultimately you will make Guyana better,” Minister Harmon advised.Referring to the contents of a publication by President David Granger, where he referred to the crises of employment, education and empowerment faced by young people, who make up 60 per cent of the nation’s population, the state minister said government has a clear vision for the development of this important sector of the population.Following national consultations across the ten regions of Guyana, a draft National Youth Policy, headed by the Presidential Advisor on Youth Empowerment Aubrey Norton has been reviewed by Cabinet and is now being prepared as a ‘white paper’ to be laid in the National Assembly and made public for scrutiny and consultation.However, Harmon noted that even as the National Youth Policy is in the pipeline the challenges facing Guyana’s youth are of a critical nature and hence it is important that interventions like this training programme begin immediately.The minister also spoke on the importance of social cohesion and lauded the organisers of the programme for the diversity reflected by the faces of the graduates. He called on them to return to their communities and resolve to work to remove the political, economic, social and cultural barriers that divide Guyanese.“I hope the training, which you have received here, will enable you to establish cohesive relationships and cohesive groups to foster cohesive communities and thus a truly cohesive society in our country… Your government is unequivocal and resolutely committed to the establishment of a cohesive society. We cannot, we will not develop by half or any other fraction or configuration… a holistic arrangement where all of our country’s people are committed and involved is indispensable to any real development that we achieve as a nation.”Further Harmon called on the young people to not see politics as a ‘big people’ thing but to become involved in the “political, economic and social affairs of your communities as precursors to your involvement in regional and national affairs.”He added that even as they work to develop existing and new youth organisations at the community level, they must also focus on their personal development.last_img read more

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Volunteers with the Northern Environmental Action Team were busy canning over the summer for members of the community who are in need.NEAT said that Fort St. John residents came together during two canning sessions to prepare 628 jars filled with applesauce, berry jam, pickled carrots and beans, stewed herbed tomatoes, relish, and other preserved foods that were donated to local food banks. Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team presenting Community Can donations to the Salvation Army. Supplied photo Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team presenting Community Can donations to the Salvation Army. Supplied photo Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team bringing Community Can donations to the Women's Resource Society. Supplied photo Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team bringing Community Can donations to the Women’s Resource Society. Supplied photo – Advertisement -Food security is a growing concern in the Peace Region area where prices can be much higher than elsewhere across the country.NEAT says that teaching food preservation skills and providing healthy donations to outreach organizations can help shed light on these issues.NEAT extended thanks to the North Peace Savings & Credit Union and Enbridge for their support of its Community Can initiative, as well as to those members of the community who donated locally-grown fruits and vegetables, their time and their canning skills to make the Community Can a huge success this year.“The Community Canning Program has been a wonderful support to The Fort St. John Food Bank,” said the Salvation Army’s executive director Cameron Eggie. “It pleases our volunteers & staff to be able to give out a healthy-homemade product and it really makes our guests feel supported by their community. Thank you NEAT!”Advertisementlast_img read more

first_img1 Ermin Bicakcic, 26, is a highly-rated talent at German side Hoffenheim Stoke and West Brom are both eyeing swoops for Hoffenheim defender Ermin Bicakcic, according to reports in Germany.The Bosnian international is rated highly in the Bundesliga and has been scouted regularly over the past two years by clubs in the Premier League.According to Bild, West Brom boss Tony Pulis is desperate to bring the 26-year-old to The Hawthorns this summer, while his old club Stoke are also monitoring the situation.Bicakcic’s current contract with Hoffenheim expires next summer and the club don’t want to lose him on a free.The former Stuttgart man has apparently refused to extend his current deal with Hoffenheim due to the interest from the Premier League and is awaiting contact from either Stoke or West Brom.last_img read more

first_imgWEST HILLS – An 18-year-old man who appeared to have fallen 30 feet down an embankment was rescued by helicopter today and appears to be in stable condition, officials said. The man, whose name was not released, broke his leg and had minor head trauma after falling at El Escorpion Park near Vanowen Street and Valley Circle Boulevard, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman David Ortiz. He was airlifted by helicopter and was being taken to a local hospital, Ortiz said. It was unclear whether someone spotted the man, or if he was with someone when the call came into firefighters at 2:44 p.m., Ortiz said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_imgThe N.C. General Assembly has reappointed the first woman elected principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and a Highlands homebuilder to the Western Carolina University Board of Trustees.Joyce Conseen Dugan and John R. Lupoli will serve their second consecutive four-year terms on the WCU board, effective July 1.Dugan retired from the Cherokee Central School System in 2011 after a lengthy career that included stints as a teacher’s assistant, teacher, director of federal programs and superintendent. In 1995, she became the first woman elected principal chief, an office she held for four years. After leaving public office, Dugan began working at Harrah’s Cherokee Casino Resort, becoming the casino’s director of public, government and community relations.Dugan earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from WCU. She received the university Alumni Association’s Professional Achievement Award in 1996 and was placed on the Honor Roll of Peak Performers in the WCU College of Education and Allied Professions.Lupoli is owner and president of Lupoli Construction. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects and the N.C. Small Town Main Street design committee, and former chair of the N.C. Small Town Main Street economic restructuring committee.Lupoli is an active supporter of Highlands Playhouse and The Bascom, a nonprofit center for the visual arts. He was the 2012 recipient of the N.C. Small Town Main Street Award for Design for Highlands’ town square renovation project and a 2011 recipient of a grant from the N.C. Main Street Solutions Fund awarded by the N.C. Department of Commerce.The reappointed trustees and four newly selected board members will be sworn in at the board’s quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 15. The WCU Board of Trustees is composed of 13 members, including eight elected by the UNC Board of Governors, four appointed by the General Assembly, and the university’s Student Government Association president, who serves in an ex-officio capacity.last_img read more

first_imgNorth Carolina’s only federally recognized American Indian tribe could soon offer sports and horse wagering to patrons at its two casinos. The General Assembly gave final approval Monday night to a measure that would give the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians the authority to offer the additional betting. The House voted for the measure that had already cleared the Senate three months ago. The bill now goes to Gov. Roy Cooper’s desk. A Cooper spokesman says the bill will be reviewed before he makes a decision on whether to sign it. The sports-book option took shape after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a federal law last year that made most sports gambling illegal. State law already lets the Eastern Band offer live poker, slot machines and video-style games.last_img read more

first_img17 January 2014 The Saldanha Bay Industrial Development Zone, launched late last year, is already drawing strong international interest, with several lease agreements signed and a surge of global oil and gas companies negotiating joint ventures with South African firms, the Western Cape provincial government said on Thursday. “The Saldanha Bay IDZ Licencing Company has signed six lease agreements with international and South African oil and gas companies,” Western Cape Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Minister Alan Winde said in a statement. “These include firms specialising in oilfield services, oil rig operations, logistics operators, ship repair, engineering and market support.” Final negotiations for lease agreements are taking place between the Licencing Company and two international oilfield service companies and a South African rig repair firm, Winde said. “In some of the most exciting developments, the Licencing Company is in talks with an international consortium to develop a rig module building facility. We are also aware of a R200-million investment by a global oil servicing company which is set to create 300 jobs. Several leading international companies are increasing their staff numbers in their South African companies.” Winde said details on individual companies were bound by non-disclosure agreements and could not be released at this stage.African oil, gas service and supply hub A feasibility study conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry found that Saldanha Bay is strategically located to serve as a service, maintenance, fabrication and supply hub for the booming African oil and gas sector, due to the increasing number of oil rigs requiring maintenance, and their traffic flow passing from the west to the east coast of Africa. In October last year, German company Oiltanking GmbH entered a joint venture with a number of South African companies to build a commercial crude oil storage and blending terminal at the port of Saldanha. The company said that Saldanha was an excellent location for a crude oil hub, “as it is close to strategic tanker routes from key oil-producing regions to major oil-consuming markets”. Ideally situated for the blending of west African and South American crude oils, Saldanha “has the potential to establish itself as a global crude transhipment hub focused on certain established trade routes,” the company added. The Western Cape government has invested R25-million over five years in setting up the industrial development zone (IDZ). “This is the culmination of years of collaboration between all spheres of government and the Saldanha Bay community,” Winde said. “The IDZ has the potential to become one of the most important levers for jobs and economic growth for the Western Cape. Early indications are that it will indeed be a major catalyst for foreign direct investment and increased employment opportunities for our residents in the medium to long term.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

first_imgThe Internet of Things (IoT) envisions a world scattered with devices and sensors that collect and transmit data about almost anything. But a bottleneck to the vision is being able to keep these devices powered for long periods of time.  Batteries lose charge quickly and the maintenance costs of battery replacement in the field for many devices is too expensive.Increasingly some of the larger devices, meters and sensors in the field are being powered by solar.  For smaller devices, new techniques are being investigated. This area of research is being called “energy harvesting“.  Scientists look at many different alternative external sources of energy, including solar, thermal, wind, and kinetic energy. The global market for energy harvesting devices is expected to be $4.2 billion by 2019.As an example of mechanical energy harvesting, some scientists are researching how energy from human movement can be used to power smartphones and wearable devices. The army, for example, is investigating devices that strap to a soldier’s leg that captures mechanical energy as the soldier walks. Noel Soto, a project engineer at the Army Natick Soldier Research Center, said that “we are converting the movement of the knees when you walk into useful power. We have found out through studies that soldiers are carrying a heavy load and a lot of that weight, 16 to 20 pounds for a 72-hour mission, is due to batteries.”Just the movements of tapping and scrolling on your smartphone might be able to produce enough energy that can feed back into the phone to power it.  Nelson Sepulveda, associate professor at Michigan State University, said that “what I foresee, relatively soon, is the capability of not having to charge your cell phone for an entire week, for example, because that energy will be produced by your movement.”last_img read more

first_img Gene therapy stops bleeding episodes in hemophilia trial By Jocelyn KaiserDec. 6, 2017 , 5:00 PM iStock.com/somersault18:24 center_img Researchers have scored their first clear success in using gene therapy to treat hemophilia, an inherited blood disorder. Ten men received a single intravenous infusion of a harmless virus ferrying a gene for factor IX, a blood-clotting protein missing in people with hemophilia B. Up to 18 months later, the men’s livers are making, on average, 34% the normal level of factor IX. That’s enough that nine of the 10 patients have had no bleeding episodes, researchers report today in The New England Journal of Medicine. What’s more, eight of the 10 no longer need factor IX injections every few days. Previous gene therapy trials for hemophilia B didn’t go well, either because patients’ immune systems destroyed the modified cells or the cells didn’t make enough factor IX. In the new trial, sponsored by Spark Therapeutics and Pfizer, researchers gave the patients’ liver cells the gene for an unusually potent version of the factor IX protein. That allowed the team to lower the vector dose, minimizing immune responses. Two patients had elevated liver enzymes in reaction to the vector, but those levels came down after they received steroids. Only 20% of hemophilia patients have the B form, but efforts are also underway to use gene therapy to treat the most common type, hemophilia A.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more