first_imgJEFF HUNTLEY Anthony Addonizio will be an important component to the Hornets’ success this year. On Sept. 15, team looks to avenge last season’s loss to Freehold Boro By Warren Rappleyea Staff Writer With 14 key veterans returning, the Holmdel High School football team will be looking to upgrade last fall’s 6-4 mark and is seeking a return trip the NJSIAA Central Jersey Group II playoffs. JEFF HUNTLEY Head Coach Joe O’Connor will be looking for his Holmdel High School football team to rely on its experience in competing against some of the top teams in the Shore this year. The Hornets’ roster is loaded with experienced seniors and untested sophomores, with a few juniors sprinkled in. The experience will help, especially on offense, where coach Joe O’Connor is switching to the multiple-I set-up to take advantage of his team’s speed and offensive line strength. A year ago Holmdel employed the wing-T. “This team is built more for the multiple-I,” O’Connor explained. “We have the speed and skill to adapt, and the team has been picking it up quickly.” The new offense will keep runners Chris Hernando and Anthony Addonizio busy. Hernando, a 5-8, 165-pound junior, is back at halfback where he ran for more than 800 yards in 1999. The versatile Addonizio, a 6-1, 215-pounder, moves to fullback full time this season after splitting his time at tight end a year ago. He put up more than 900 total yards as a sophomore. Three players, senior Dave Menges, and juniors John Guisti and Dan Principe, are competing for the quarterback job. All three saw some time behind center, but Menges played the most and appears to have the inside track, though O’Connor has not yet made a decision. “Each one brings something to the table,” O’Connor said. “We’ll have to see how things go over the next few weeks.” Wideouts Paul Hlavaty and Adam Goff, along with tight end Greg Laplante, all seniors, and possibly Guisti, comprise the receiving corps. Seniors Adam Cox (6-1, 230), Alex Wright (5-11, 210), Mike Russo (6-2, 190), Evan Sorg (6-0, 190) and John Yang (6-0, 225), and junior Chris Satienza (6-1, 240) will man the offensive line. All, except for Wright will see action on the defensive line as well, with Hlavaty also pitching in on defensive end. Like the linemen, several other Hornets will be playing on both sides of scrimmage. Addonizio, Hernando, Guisti, Laplante and Wright are the linebackers in Holmdel’s 4-3 alignment. Menges, Principe and Goff are the defensive backs. Addonizio will handle the punting, while Laura Carcich, who missed most of last season with injuries, is back to do the place-kicking. Two years ago, Carcich, then a sophomore, converted 13 of 17 PAT attempts. “With a lot of guys going both ways, the key for us will be staying healthy,” O’Connor said. “We have talent and good experience, and we’re looking forward to the start of the season.” Holmdel hosts Freehold Boro Sept. 15 at 7 p.m. in the season-opener for both teams. Last year the Hornets took a 12-0 lead into the fourth quarter against the Colonials but ended up on the short end of a 14-12 decision. “We want to get off to a good start and that means winning that first game,” O’Connor said. “Freehold Boro beat us in an exciting game, but it’s one we’d like to have back. Now we get to play them again.”last_img read more

first_imgSocial and behavioral research is finally getting some of the high-level attention it has sought for years at the National Institutes of Health. Yesterday NIH Director Francis Collins announced that $10 million in recovery money will go to support the launch of the Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network – they’re calling it OppNet, an initiative to support and coordinate basic behavioral research throughout NIH. The American Psychological Society  Association for Psychological Science (APS), which has been working with Congress for about a decade to get more behavioral science into NIH, is ecstatic about OppNet. APS Executive Director Alan Kraut says NIH’s Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, which isn’t a funding agency, “has had less and less impact over time.” OppNet, to be led by Jeremy Berg, director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, and National Institute on Aging Director Richard Hodes, “is much higher visibility.” It will be getting all institute directors together on a regular basis to talk about behavioral research needs. Although basic behavioral research already gets about $1 billion a year from NIH, Kraut says OppNet will funnel money into cross-disciplinary areas that have hitherto been ignored. NIH institutes and centers have committed to putting another $110 million into the initiative over the next 5 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more