first_imgThe equipment to set-up the cinema is portable and can be taken anywhere. (Image: The Sunshine Cinema)Using solar energy for power, the Sunshine Cinema screens short films of uplifting and useful content, targeting youth and rural communities, to promote self-empowerment by sharing practical ways to improve life.Sunshine Cinema produces a range of “how to” videos and facilitates workshops, as well as makes narrative-based short films that address social issues.Sydelle Willow Smith, the co-founder of Sunshine Cinema, told Redbull Amaphiko, “a collaborative platform for social entrepreneurs who want to change their corner of the world”: “We’re a collaboration between the skills development collective, The Shift, and the documentary filmmakers, Makhulu.”The group chose to use solar power, she said, because as filmmakers and design innovators they had worked in a variety of environments where electricity was not prevalent, and because renewable is sustainable. “We use solar power because we’re passionate about sustainable forms of energy.”RURAL AND DISENFRANCHISED BENEFITThe filmmakers decided to take their productions to the rural and disenfranchised people who were marginalised and did not get the opportunity to view their work.“As filmmakers from privileged backgrounds,” Smith said, “we felt we were often making films in areas where the people we were filming wouldn’t get a chance to see the work. This was problematic so we wanted to find ways to bring films to communities across the digital divide.“We screen community-tailored documentary content in the hope of promoting skills development, dialogues and enabling communities to become their own ‘engines of development.’”The screenings differ but in general they start with warm-up games to connect with the audience, before the viewers are shown the solar-powered cinema kit. “We then screen a selection of short films, including documentaries and our DIY tutorial clips for the day.”RECEPTION OF FILMSAnd the movies are well-received. “[The reception is] fantastic, everyone loves a cinema,” said Smith. “In the last two years we’ve visited diverse communities, youth, farmworkers and rural women’s groups, and all have responded well. We ran a record-breaking crowd-funding campaign on Thundafund and we’ve been featured on local and international media platforms.”Smith singles out the screening workshop in the township of Langa, in Cape Town. “One of the most impactful screening workshops we’ve hosted was in Langa, where we showed a video on how to make seats out of discarded tyres. It was a fantastic experience.“After our tyre seat workshop we screened a local animation film called Khumba. This meant the kids could roll their seats into the makeshift cinema we had created and watch their favourite cartoon.”CHALLENGES AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURESunshine Cinema started as a worthy idea but snowballed into a demanding start-up enterprise, according to Smith.“This rapid growth for Sunshine Cinema has been driven by a small team, which we would love to grow so that we can scale our impact too. Accessing early stage funding is never easy, and most of Sunshine Cinema’s development to date has been funded by the founding partners.”The Sunshine Cinema team will be going on a roadshow in August. “We’re partnering with other organisations to test the reception of the cinema beyond South Africa’s borders. We’ll be travelling from Cape Town to Kenya conducting research about our approach. We’re also working on making our content easily accessible to a wider audience.”last_img read more

first_imgA pair of old fishing buddies is now steering the ship at the Scripps Research Institute, one of the world’s largest private basic biomedical research institutes. Today, Steve Kay, formerly the dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles was announced as Scripps’s president, whereas Peter Schultz, currently a Scripps chemist and director of the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr) in San Diego, was named CEO. Kay will be in charge of day-to-day operations, whereas Schultz will lay out Scripps’s long-term strategic plan.The announcement likely brings to a close a contentious chapter at Scripps, which has campuses in San Diego, California, and Jupiter, Florida. Just over a year ago, Scripps faculty led a revolt against the institute’s former leadership amid financial troubles and merger discussions with USC. The appointments also portend a new push aimed at marrying the institute’s historical strength in basic biomedical research with translational medicine designed to turn research leads into novel treatments.“It’s a very exciting move,” says Peter Kim, formerly the head of the Merck Research Laboratories and now a biochemist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. In addition to running Calibr, Schultz previously led the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF), and has been a founder of eight startups involved in using robotics and other high throughput technologies to advance biomedicine and materials science. Before joining USC, Kay also worked with Schultz at Scripps and GNF. Together the pair has raised well over $1 billion in backing from pharma companies, foundations, and private donations in their recent positions.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Scripps is “very fortunate” to have landed both to share the top duties at the institute, Kim says. Phil Baran, a Scripps chemist and member of the search committee that selected Kay and Schultz, agrees. “I think everyone here will be relieved that we have icons charting the course of the ship, which will let us go back to doing science,” he says.The ship’s previous course got a bit turbulent. Last July, Scripps’s board of trustees called off merger talks with USC after the Scripps faculty revolted. The potential marriage was offered as a way out of the red for Scripps, which had seen a sharp drop in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). USC at the time was flush, in the midst of a $6 billion capital campaign. The university also has a medical school, which meant potentially easier access to clinical research for Scripps’s stable of basic biomedical researchers. But Scripps faculty feared loss of autonomy and objected loudly to news of the merger talks. Ultimately, Scripps’s then-President and CEO Michael Marletta resigned, cell biologist Jim Paulson was named as an interim president and CEO, and a search committee was formed to find a new direction.An emphasis on translationThe centerpiece of this new direction, say Kay and Schultz, will be a long-term push into translational research. Like most academic institutions, today Scripps sticks mainly to basic research, discovering the molecular underpinnings of health and disease. Pharmaceutical companies, by contrast, focus most of their efforts at the other end of the drug development pipeline, moving potential drug compounds through human clinical trials into the market. The space between basic science and drug approval—the translational piece—has come to be known as the “valley of death,” because many promising findings never make it to market. Translational researchers must take promising early-stage compounds and go through a host of refinements to improve measures such as how long compounds last in the body and how well they move through the bloodstream, find their targets, and minimize their toxicity.Kay and Schultz say they plan to form alliances with Calibr and other institutes to ease the path for Scripps faculty to do much of this translational research in house. By doing so, they say, this will ensure that more compounds make it into human trials, bring extra licensing royalties into the institute, and, ultimately, improve the lives of patients. “If we are successful, not only are we making new medicines that can help people, we are potentially creating additional financial resources [for Scripps],” Schultz says.Scripps already has a strong track record for getting medicines into the clinic. According to the institute, eight compounds originally discovered at Scripps are now on the market, while another 30 are in various stages of clinical development. Those were developed, in part, as a byproduct of previous alliances in which pharmaceutical companies payed for rights to develop would-be drugs discovered at Scripps, as well as through the more traditional approach of licensing early-stage compounds to startup companies that then raise money to develop them further.That model, particularly finding institutional backing from pharma companies, “probably no longer works,” Schultz says. Today, large pharma companies are more averse to risking money on unproven therapies, and thus more apt to sit on the sidelines until compounds advance at least until early-stage human clinical trials. That forces biotech companies that license compounds to do much of the translational research themselves, something they aren’t always best suited to do.To make matters worse, when research institutes license their promising compounds very early in development, the terms of such deals often aren’t great for the basic researchers. The institute doesn’t get much money, and researchers lose control over what happens to their compounds, says Patrick Griffin, who runs a translational research center at Scripps in Florida. Many compounds then go on to fail—not because they aren’t effective, Griffin adds, but because companies decide to move in a different business direction. “If you can move a [would-be drug] along in a nonprofit, you can nurture it so it has a better opportunity to advance,” Griffin says. “Fewer will fail, and you will have more shots on goal,” of making it to market, he says.Those extra shots are critical, Griffin and others say, because 95% of all would-be drugs fail during development. When costs of the failures are added in, the price of bringing a new drug to market is well over $1 billion. That has not only caused large pharma companies to back away from early-stage drug discovery, but it has forced them to pursue primarily large-market blockbuster drugs for common conditions such as heart disease and cancer, while avoiding medicines for rare diseases.As a nonprofit focused on translational research, Calibr has already begun to change this arrangement in a small way. Today, the institute, which opened in 2012, has a staff of only about 110 people and an annual budget of some $25 million. But thanks to early progress on would-be drugs for neglected diseases, Calibr has already attracted funding from nonprofit foundations such as the Wellcome Trust, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Schultz says the institute expects to put four to six drugs into the clinic over the next year or two.Cutting costsSchultz and Kay plan to take more immediate actions to shore up Scripps’s finances. According to a July report by Fitch, a bond rating agency, Scripps’ finances are “stable.” But the institute has operated in the red for years, and has been forced to cover its deficit by drawing down its endowment, which shrunk from $430 million in fiscal year 2012 to $397 million in fiscal year 2014.One move that could save $12 million annually would be to replace nearly 37,000 square meters of leased lab space with two newly constructed buildings owned by Scripps. Schultz and Kay say they continue to explore an existing plan to raise more than $100 million to pay for the buildings. “That would have a big impact pretty quick,” Griffin says. But ultimately, he says, Scripps’s stability will be decided on how effective Schultz and Kay are in hooking together formerly disparate parts of the drug development pipeline, and how many would-be drugs the fishing buddies manage to snare in their net.*Correction, 18 September, 3:07 p.m.: This story incorrectly identified Scripps as the world’s largest basic biomedical research institute. It is among the world’s largest private biomedical research institutes.last_img read more

first_imgNarayanaswami SrinivasanNarayanaswami Srinivasan, 65, is in the middle of several controversies, befitting his status as newly anointed president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), the richest, most powerful and most-pilloried cricket board in the world. He has rejected demands for an inquiry into India’s disastrous England,Narayanaswami SrinivasanNarayanaswami Srinivasan, 65, is in the middle of several controversies, befitting his status as newly anointed president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), the richest, most powerful and most-pilloried cricket board in the world. He has rejected demands for an inquiry into India’s disastrous England tour, sought legal advice on how to resolve the Kochi Tuskers crisis, and parried countless calls from Pakistan Cricket Board president Ijaz Bhatt seeking a renewal of Indo-Pakistan cricket ties.The chairman of India Cements which, in turn, is the prime investor in IPL team Chennai Super Kings, Srinivasan is a chemical engineer from the Illinois Institute of Technology as well as a chartered accountant. As he sits in the Chennai office of India Cements, which has a turnover of Rs 3,800 crore, surrounded by pictures of grandchildren, a clay model of Mahatma Gandhi and a miniature charkha on his table, he is determined to change the course of BCCI in his three years as president.”I hate this middle path where you have to please everybody. The Lalit Modi issue has been hanging fire, it has to end. In the International Cricket Council (ICC), I would like members to strongly take up various cricketing issues and involve associate members as well. Let’s expand, let the best man lead ICC,” he says. With fewer hours devoted to golf-he used to play daily as compared to his current weekly cycle-he has also dropped out as president of the All India Chess Federation so that he can devote more time to BCCI.advertisementHe has enough on his plate. The finance ministry claims the board owes it Rs 160 crore in service tax on IPL franchisee fees and sale of advertisement space in 2010. Worse, his one-time mentor and former BCCI president, A.C. Muthiah, has been seeking an injunction from the Supreme Court against Srinivasan holding top slots in the BCCI and an IPL team. The courts have refused to restrain Srinivasan who, as a matter of routine, maintains that he does not own Chennai Super Kings and that it’s run by a team of professionals.From district vice-president of Tamil Nadu Cricket Association in 2001 to his big break in 2005, when he became treasurer in the Sharad Pawar-led BCCI, he has managed to steer clear of controversy until now. Excerpts from an interview with deputy editor Shantanu Guha Ray.Q. Did you check your stars before assuming the role of BCCI president?A. (Laughs) I did but cannot share the name of my astrologer, nor what he told me about my future.Q. List three of your immediate priorities as board president.A. I want to focus on the development of the game, greater accountability and transparency. There is a fourth priority: The public must know the truth about former IPL commissioner Lalit Modi. It must also know that the BCCI is an honest body.Q. Why is the BCCI not pushing for Modi’s extradition? He is being investigated by the Enforcement Directorate and the Income Tax department on charges of accepting kickbacks in IPL television deals, rigging bids for teams and openly flouting BCCI guidelines.A. He is mocking us from England with his tweets. He is making a mockery of our judicial system. He thinks he can still control cricket with his tweets and blogs. I cannot issue summons, I do not run a court in this country. There are investigating agencies which are pursuing these cases against him. There are courts which will take note if summons are being avoided. If the Government wants, his passport will be cancelled. The recent Supreme Court judgment rejected Modi’s demand for a change in the BCCI Disciplinary Committee probing him.Q. But the Kochi issue is hanging fire and the team has been suspended because of payment defaults. There are rumours that some of the players could be put up for auction.A. We did what was written in the rule book. The team was repeatedly warned and asked to pay its dues. Now, the Kochi Tuskers management has threatened legal action. As far as the BCCI is concerned, Kochi is out of IPL. The case needs to be resolved. I know what you will ask next. There’s no personal agenda here. We had issues with Rajasthan Royals and Kings XI Punjab but those were sorted out.Q. What are your thoughts on icc’s recent efforts to revisit the governance of the game? There are demands that associate members be given a larger say.A. I am not in favour of regulations which give only a few the upper hand. They need to be changed. After all, members own the ICC and have to play an integral part in running the game.advertisementQ. Do you think the ICC’s rotation system of appointing a president should be done away with?A. It’s my view that the best person should run ICC. We can work out a system where professionals take charge.Q. Does this mean the president has to be from India?A. No, I didn’t say that. He can be from any member country.Q. Is the BCCI behind the ICC’s call for depoliticisation of cricket because of the mooted National Sports Development Bill that seeks to rein in sports bodies in India?A. There should be depoliticisation of cricket. But I was not on the executive board when this decision was taken. I think it would be grossly unfair to lay the blame at BCCIs doorstep.Q. Politicians like Rajiv Shukla, Vilasrao Deshmukh and Anurag Thakur are holding crucial posts in the BCCI. It appears as if you are seeking a political solution to what has become a political problem (the sports ministry’s demand to bring BCCI under its control) in sports?A. Scan the list of BCCI’s state bodies and you will see loads of politicians, except in the south where people associated with cricket run the show. So, appointing politicians is not a recent phenomenon and I am certainly not doing it to fortify my defence.Q. The parliamentary Standing Committee on Finance in 2010 asked the Government to investigate FEMA and FIPB violations by IPL franchisees. Will the BCCI cooperate?A. Aren’t we cooperating? All papers pertaining to IPL during Modi’s tenure were handed over to the investigating agencies in 2010.Q. The Indian team is riddled with injury-related problems. You lost as many as eight players on the England tour. Already short of pacers, the batting mainstay of Rahul Dravid, Sachin Tendulkar and V.V.S. Laxman is unlikely to last your three-year term. How do you propose to reinforce the side?A. We have a strong bench. That’s why we could send a team to the West Indies and survive the England tour. This is cricket, not child’s play. It’s an ordeal by fire. Those in it will have to perform if they wish to replace legends like Sachin and Rahul.Q. Do you think the huge sums of money involved in cricket distract attention from other sports?A. That is an unfair charge. Corporations in India put in money because they find the game of cricket an attractive investment. You cannot blame BCCI for the decline of other sports. On the contrary, the BCCI continues to help games like football in India.Q. Finally, when will you play a series against Pakistan?A. This needs a political answer. Please get it from Delhi.last_img read more

first_imgTottenham Hotspur Mind games: Rooney shows Alli that it’s possible to control red mist Harry Sherlock 01:00 1/13/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Dele Alli, Tottenham, 17/18 Getty Images Tottenham Hotspur Tottenham Hotspur v Everton Everton Premier League Opinion The Spurs midfielder picks up yellow cards regularly, but remains one of his team’s best players under Mauricio Pochettino Dele Alli loves playing the pantomime villain and, in recent weeks, his dark side has again been on show.Last season, the England international saw red for a gruesome tackle in a Europa League encounter with Gent, leading to a three-match Champions League ban, while he has also regularly been accused of going to ground too easily.He was booked for simulation against Huddersfield Town earlier this season, prompting  former referee Graham Poll to claimed that the attacking midfielder “can’t stop cheating”. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player In Spurs’ final game before Christmas at Burnley, Alli was accused of diving to win a penalty which Harry Kane converted. In the same match, he flew into an early challenge that many at Turf Moor saw as a red card. He was only booked, but the locals turned on him instantly, jeering his every touch, and abusing him when he was substituted in the second half.Neither the incident nor the crowd reaction impacted upon his performance, though, as he provided two assists for hat-trick hero Kane in a 3-0 win.However, if one also factors in a poor challenge on Kevin de Bruyne the week before, in Spurs’ 4-1 defeat at Manchester City, then it’s easy to see why the spotlight has once again been intensely focused on the 21-year-old.Dele Alli TottenhamAlli is a player who often balances light with dark, as though he has an angel on one shoulder and a devil on the other.He is, by far, Spurs’ most fouled player (56 fouls) but he has also conceded more fouls (26) than any of his team-mates. Alli gets kicked, but he kicks back and, while his effectiveness has improved, he remains prone to lapses of judgement.Widely criticised for letting his standards slip after Spurs’ memorable 3-1 win over Real Madrid at Wembley at the start of November, Alli has undergone something of a renaissance in form in recent weeks, at the same time his negative traits have come back to the fore.In his last six appearances, Alli has been directly involved in six goals – four assists and two goals – to firm up the belief that he would be less of a player if the devilment was taken out of his game.Supporters often forget how difficult it can be to replicate a brilliant individual performance week in, week out, and Alli’s performances post-Madrid, when seen through the lens of hindsight, could be attributed to fatigue, both mental and physical.Dele Alli Mauricio Pochettino TottenhamAs Daniel Abrahams , sports psychologist to the England rugby team, explains, it is folly to expect players to continually repeat their individual heroics.Talking exclusively to Goal , he said: “A brilliant performance is hard to replicate because of the many variables related to the game and the player. No two games are alike and thus the role a player may be asked to carry out might not allow players to express themselves.“The toughest challenge is the personal one. There are many reasons why people tend to perform inconsistently, but I point to what I call the three Ms – mood, motivation and movement. Mood goes up and down and impacts a player’s perception of the game, the same with motivation.“And for movement, what many people don’t realise is that our nervous system is designed to function inconsistently. Movement varies moment to moment, let alone day to day.”Alli’s recent form, however, suggests that he is in the mood to create, and has the motivation to repay the faith shown in him by both the Spurs support and Mauricio Pochettino.As a game with Everton at Wembley looms on Saturday, there is an obvious comparison to be made with former England captain Wayne Rooney.A teenager when he burst on the scene, Rooney was prone to outbursts of outright rage on the pitch.Of course, his most infamous transgression came at the 2006 World Cup, when he stamped on Portugal’s Ricardo Carvalho and was shown a red card for his troubles. The quarter-final tie finished 0-0 and England were knocked out on penalties.Wayne Rooney EvertonIt seemed a natural conclusion to his fiery playing style. In the four seasons leading up to that World Cup, Rooney was sent off twice and booked 36 times.Yet both David Moyes and Sir Alex Ferguson noticed that the fire that burned inside the forward was integral to Rooney’s being.Even as he has grown older, he has never truly curbed that side of his game: he is still petulant at times, and he still gets booked, but he has brought those urges under control to a degree. He was last sent off in 2014, and is now a key player for Everton under Sam Allardyce.Alli’s abilities and physique are different to Rooney’s – the former is lithe where the latter was stocky and bullish – but they both have that hot-headed streak that can both win and lose a football match.Rooney, now 32, has had a career few can dream of, despite his occasional walks on the wild side, and that is something Alli can learn from.As Alli grows as a player, the questionable challenges and controversial moments should gradually become less frequent as he tries to turn negative press into trophy success.last_img read more

first_imgPlease find enclosed the draft draw for the 2013 X-Blades National Youth Championships to be held at Stockland Park, Caloundra from Wednesday, 11 September until Saturday, 14 September. A NYC Memo and draft draw structure is also attached. There are plenty of ways to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information from the 2013 X-Blades National Youth Championships (NYC). Websiteswww.nyc.mytouchfooty.comwww.austouch.com.au Social MediaFacebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustraliaTwitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (be sure to use the hashtag #nyc2013)Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustraliaYouTube – www.youtube.com/touchfootballaus Related Filesdraft_draw__external__v1-pdfdraft_draw_structure_and_format__updated_-pdfnyc_memo_-_23-8-2013-pdfRelated LinksNYC Draft Drawlast_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd captain Young: Maguire already a leaderby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United captain Ashley Young says Harry Maguire is already a squad leader.Maguire was jeered by Leicester City fans throughout United’s 1-0 win at Old Trafford yesterday, but the £80million centre back responded with a fine performance to help his side to a second clean sheet of the season.”You know, I think the manager’s said about him, he talks non-stop, he’s a real leader and he can play as well,” said Young.”The style of play we use, we use the centre-halves a lot to play out from the back and everybody has got confidence in him. And everybody has confidence in Victor [Lindelof], Jonah [Phil Jones], Marcos [Rojo] – all the defenders, all the centre-backs can go in there and do the job.”Again he showed today what a man he is, and I think as a backline we played a really good game.” last_img read more

first_imgTeden Mengi pens Man Utd dealby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTeden Mengi has signed pro terms with Manchester United.The teen confirmed this morning his new deal.Happy to sign my first professional contact with @ManUtd the hard work continues! #mufcpic.twitter.com/FICD0gIQrj— Teden Mengi (@TedenMengi_) September 21, 2019 TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

first_imgClemson fans line the streets after Orange Bowl.Clemson FansClemson didn’t win the national title on Monday night, but the Tigers still proved themselves worthy, pushing Alabama to the brink in a 45-40 loss. Clemson fans in attendance at the game, despite the loss, appear to have recognized that fact.According to a number of fans at the contest, Clemson supporters did the program’s “cadence count” as they left the stadium. Pretty cool.Doing the cadence count on the way out of the #NationalChampionship is what the #ClemsonFamily is all about. C u in Tampa next year! #ALLIN— Murphy Andrews (@murphy_and) January 12, 2016Clemson fans doing the cadence count walking out. Love that passion !— Clemson Tom (@ClemsonTom) January 12, 2016The cadence count from the crowd put me over. The tears are coming but I am so incredibly proud of this team. #ClemsonFamily #AllIn— Callie Hahn (@CallieHahndro) January 12, 2016This will be tough for Clemson fans to swallow, but there’s no doubt that the program is in good shape. Dabo Swinney will have the Tigers back in the title game sooner rather than later.last_img read more