first_img Loading …Voting is open now here and on Twitter, and feel free to comment about why you made your choice. We’ll see you next week to crown yet another winner in the saga of Ask It! As I’m writing this up, I can hear the sounds of the fireworks from Wishes from outside my home office. Without looking up, I can tell from the sounds of the shells what “scene” is going on for the show. It will certainly be an adjustment when the new “Happily Ever After” nighttime spectacular debuts later this spring. It seems that everyone has a favorite nighttime show at Walt Disney World — so here’s this week’s question:What is your favorite current nighttime show at Walt Disney World Wishes (46%, 358 Votes) Illuminations (30%, 230 Votes) Fantasmic (21%, 163 Votes) Rivers of Light (3%, 23 Votes) Total Voters: 774center_img Share This!last_img read more

first_img The interview process is about mutual discovery—learn as much about your potential team and organization as they are learning about you. (Large preview)Question #5“What are the three pieces of your product that are most valuable but also in the most need of an update?”Why ask this?This question is all about priority and, similar to the prior question, this could be digging more into the tech stack of the product. My reason for asking actually has more to do with the “core loop” of the product. The core-loop is the dopamine hit that attracts a user and keeps them coming back to enjoy the product repeatedly.It’s akin to the food pellet that makes a rat respond to stimuli. It can also be a prime pain-point that’s a massive trigger for catastrophic system failure, and thus ultimate fear within the team. “Don’t do anything to this or our entire system could shut down.” When considering some changes to that legacy system perhaps we simply leave it alone, but we might enhance it in another way leveraging something more modern as an overlay or in a new tab or window?What follow-ups might provide more insight?What is standing in the way of doing this work?What team members could we talk to about these features?Have they done any research to understand what’s causing the behavior to be erratic or difficult to maintain?What users can we speak with about the features to understand how they’re using it?Perhaps there’s a slight tweak that could be made enabling the same outcome, but putting less stress on the system?Are there small tweaks that could be made to relieve pressure on the back-end and reduce strain on the database?How is this question received?Similar to the prior question, this can quickly get technical but it doesn’t have to. I’ve posted the question to a hiring manager who also forwarded it to a member of the product and dev teams who all gave slightly different answers. As suspected, they all provided some overlap which clearly showed what the most important problem was to work on from the business’ perspective. Don’t hesitate to ask they forward the inquiry on to someone who might be better suited or could provide a more nuanced response. Gathering broad viewpoints is a hallmark of what we designers do well.Question #6“Do you have a customer I might contact to get their thoughts about your product or service?”Why ask this?This may be the boldest question on this list, but it provides so much amazing value as an incoming designer. If we are operating as practitioners of a human-centered approach, we should be comfortable talking to users and our employer should be comfortable ensuring we have access to them. Granted, you may not yet be a member of the team, and they’re not yet your customer. But putting a willing foot forward in this area speaks confidently that you would love to get first-hand access to customer feedback.What follow-ups might provide more insight?How familiar is your team talking to their users?How often does this activity take place?Assuming this customer is a fan of the company, do we have access to users who aren’t so happy with the product?Do we ever seek feedback from someone who has canceled the service?How might the team use any insights you bring back to them?How is this question received?This question is bold and can be a bit tricky. Sometimes the team doesn’t have a good customer in mind, or even if they do, they don’t have ready access to them as customers are handled by a separate gatekeeper. At the same time, I would expect most companies to have a short-list of customers who think they’ve hung the moon. The marketing department tends to plaster their quotes all over the home page so feel free to look for that prior to the interview and ask for those contacts directly.When asking this question, I’ve also provided the questions I was intending to ask as well as the answers I got back. With free user research on the table and an opportunity for the marketing team to gain additional positive feedback asking this worked out in my favor, but that won’t always be the case. Be gracious and understand if someone’s not comfortable providing this access, but it’s a strong play in expectation setting for a human-centered design practice.Question #7“What is your dedicated budget for UX and design?”Why ask this?If the value of user experience is wrapped up solely in market research, then the company doesn’t understand a human-centered approach through their users. Market research can certainly be valuable by informing the company if a business idea might be financially viable. However, user research can guide the organization in delivering something truly valuable. This question can help a prospective designer understand that the company sees design as an investment and competitive advantage.What follow-ups might provide more insight?What percentage of your overall expenditures does this represent and why?What is the highest-titled member of the design team?What is the education budget in a given year for training or events?Has this grown, shrunk, or stayed flat compared to the prior year?What are the growth areas for the design team overall, i.e. where is the design investment focused?Research?Visual design?Copywriting?Architecture? How is this question received?This is honestly more of a leadership question, but it can be tailored to even an entry-level position. Any organization without a clear operating budget for design isn’t taking the practice seriously nor its practitioners. Product, engineering, and design are the components of a balanced team. Funding one at the behest of another is a dumpster fire and clearly communicates that the balance is out of alignment.The easiest answer I’ve been given is the salary and position I’m applying for, however, that shows a lack of foresight in terms of both growth for the team by way of headcount, as well as properly empowering designers to do their best work. HomeWeb DesignTough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Discussions during an interview. You have the floor so use it to your advantage. (Large preview)Just The BeginningThese are just a few of the types of things we could be talking about during experience or product design interviews. We certainly should care about excellent visual design and elegant UI. We should absolutely care about qualitative and quantitative analytic data and the insights they provide. We should definitely care about motion design, user flows, journey maps, design systems, microcopy, and culture fit. These are all part of the playbook of any strong, digital-design candidate. But the answers to the above topics can be incredibly impactful for the first 90 days and beyond when assuming a new design role.You may not be able to ask these questions in a face-to-face discussion, but they make a great follow-up email after an interview. Or perhaps they’re questions you keep in the back of your mind as they’ll inevitably come up in your first few months on the job. They could prove very useful to guide a longer-term, strategic vision that empowers you to improve the business by crafting glorious engagement with both your teams and your customers.Does Asking These Things Actually Help Get The Job?I’ve been asked if these questions were helpful in landing a better job and truthfully, I don’t know. I did find a very rewarding new position as a Principal Product Designer, and I used these questions throughout the interview process. After I was hired, I spoke to a couple of folks who were part of that process, and they mentioned the questions, so they were at least memorable.The entire line of questioning has also resulted in the opportunity to co-author a book around using design to address organizational change and reconsidering how the field of experience design is currently defined. I would posit both of these opportunities were impacted in some way by these thought-provoking questions, even if the projects have yet to be fully realized (we are just starting work on the book, but it’s a very exciting concept).I also used the questions in interviews with several different companies and ultimately, I was able to entertain multiple offers. Through each interview using these questions allowed me deeper insights about the organization than I would have had otherwise. Did the questions directly help me get the position? Of that I’m unsure, but they were absolutely beneficial for both my own awareness and for the team I eventually joined.Final ThoughtsApproaching the job interview process more like a researcher gave me a very different perspective on the process. Interviewing can be a stressful event, but it can also be a mutual glimpse into a shared future. Any prospective employer is inviting a designer to embark on a life journey with them — or at least a year or two — and the interview is where the two parties really start to get to know one another. The answers to these questions can help paint a more transparent picture of the shared road ahead for both the designer and the teams they might partner with.Let me know your thoughts in the comments, and whether you have other tough questions you’ve asked during interviews. I would love to know how they’ve been received and continue adding to my own list!Further Reading“How You Can Find A Design Job You Will Truly Love,” Susie Pollasky“Facebook Changes Its ‘Move Fast and Break Things’ Motto,” Samantha Murphy, Mashable“Sprints & Milestones” podcast by Brett Harned and Greg Storey“Playbook” offers career advice for designers via crowdsourced Q&A“Dear Design Student” is a collab from some amazing industry veterans providing wisdom to up-and-coming design talent. #invaluable Interviewing is a great opportunity to get to know the company, take notes! (Large preview)Interviewing Like A ResearcherThe following is a list of questions that can assist in your evaluation of a prospective employer and provide invaluable insight into their organizational maturity in the digital product space. All of these questions can help to paint a more holistic and honest picture of the design process as well as the value that a talented designer might bring to an organization. Below I’ll share questions I’ve asked, as well as their intent, along with some responses I’ve received from prospective employers. Let’s dive in.Question #1“What are the three biggest challenges facing your business over the next six months? What about the six months after that?”Why ask this?This is on the ground information for any designer. Upcoming challenges should be readily apparent for anyone on the existing team, and they’re already considering how the person being interviewed might help solve them. Framing the question in this way can provide valuable insight into how far ahead the team is thinking and how proficient they are at planning. It also can help a designer quickly bring value and insights to the organization.What follow-ups might provide more insight?Does work exist in the pipeline that a designer can help immediately bring to the product through evaluative research?Is there a product that has been delayed based on initial feedback?What insights were learned and how can that be used to tighten cycles and quickly iterate to production?Is a project hemorrhaging funds from a past launch that didn’t grow as quickly as anticipated?Are there ideas of how to save this investment and help it become successful?How is this question received?This is honestly the easiest of any question on this list. It’s a bit of a softball as I would expect any executive, manager, or team member to have this information top-of-mind. That said, when I’ve asked the question it shows that I’m already considering the above and how I might be a positive influence quickly. I’ve consistently gotten great answers to this question, and it also allows for an open conversation on how a candidates’ particular skill set could be leveraged immediately once hired.Question #2“Should you be moving fast and breaking things or moving slow and fixing things?”Why ask this?Facebook popularized the mantra of “Move fast and break things,” in an effort to fail quickly while continuing to grow from what was learned. While fostering a culture of continual learning is enormously valuable, not all problems can be solved by creating completely new products.Continuing to cover up technical debt through a constant barrage of new features can be catastrophic. That said, many organizations are held hostage by successful products that continuously add features so much that innovation is completely stifled. It’s very helpful to understand both sides of this question and the value they can bring to a product’s design.What follow-ups might provide more insight?How comfortable is the team with the idea of shipping a rough Minimum Viable Product (MVP), to gain insights quickly?How risk-averse is the company or group or even the design team?Is the business dealing with a very fragile codebase?How frequently is tech debt refactored?How is UX debt identified and managed?How is this question received?This is a very thought-provoking question for lean/agile organizations and the most common response I’ve received has been, “That’s a really great question,” and the ever-popular “It depends.” I’ve gotten fantastic responses by asking this as it affords an honest reflection on the current state of the business. The design team likely has an opinion on whether they are moving too fast or too slow and if they should behave a bit differently.The answer doesn’t need to be a scary thing, but it should be honest and should afford some honest reflection. The best designers I’ve known appreciate hearty challenges they can dig into, and this question can provide additional clarity as to what you’re stepping into.Question #3“If you’re moving fast, why?Why ask this?Moving fast can be very exhilarating, but it may not result in productivity. To some stakeholders I’ve spoken with, the word “Agile” is synonymous with “I get my things faster.” In reality, being agile or ‘lean’ is about learning and delivering the right product or solution in the smallest way to customers. Moving fast can be very advantageous so long as it’s coupled with a willingness from design to show work that may not be perfect but is functional to the point of being usable. This is where moving fast is great; learning can be realized quickly and new product directions can be identified early. This can inform an interviewing designer on how data and research are being collected and distributed to other teams or the larger organization. Alternatively, if this isn’t happening, it could indicate a large opportunity for change or an unmitigated disaster so be on the lookout and follow-up accordingly.What follow-ups might provide more insight?Are you trying to break things and learn from failure, or just moving fast because of #things?Are you looking to gain mindshare in a new market?How is the growth being managed?How is the doubling or tripling of staff affecting team dynamics, agile health, or even the company culture?What plan is in place for documenting and disseminating learning that has been gathered?How important is this task for the organization and the work I do as a designer?How is this question received?This question and the next tend to be contingent on individual teams or parts of the company. I’ve also had it backfire a bit as it’s easy for someone to become defensive of their organizational behavior. One exuberant response I’ve heard is “We’re failing fast and failing often on our teams!” but when pressed with, “What have you learned from those failures? How has that learning been incorporated into the project and received by leadership?” responses were a bit uncomfortable. This is a massive red flag for me — honesty is tremendously important to me. Just be aware this can start to get into uncomfortable territory, but it can also speak volumes about a team or leader in how they manage their response.Question #4“If you’re moving slow, why?”Why ask this?Sites and applications are like rose bushes: if they aren’t pruned periodically they can get unruly and — eventually — downright ugly. Likewise, the continuous addition of new features to any code base without sufficient refactoring and paying down tech debt can create a very fragile product. The company may have started moving quickly to capture market share or breaking things in order to build quickly and try out changes to the tech stack.From a design perspective, the biggest experience gains aren’t necessarily from a design system or improved onboarding. The company may need to modernize the tech stack to focus on improved performance or application up-time. The team may need to make changes to their delivery mechanism providing some form of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CICD), a system where a designer can more easily implement A/B testing and better understand where the most impactful changes might be made.Most designers would likely not give a second thought to the state of the tech stack because that’s an ‘engineering problem’, amirite? However, getting an up-front look at the state of the product from a technical perspective is immeasurably valuable, even to design.Understanding where the company is in upgrading their systems, what frameworks are being used, and how willing they are to invest in the infrastructure of a legacy product provides a glimpse into the company or team priorities.What follow-ups might provide more insight?Which parts of the site/application/product are least-effective?Should they be retired or reinvested in?How might these upgrades impact day-to-day work?Are new features being prioritized into the new product development so we can phase out aging systems?How will these changes impact customers?Can they still get their jobs done in the new system or are they going to be retired?How is that being communicated to users?Has there been any communication around sunsetting these retiring systems to lessen the burden?Has any analysis been done to understand how much revenue is provided by those users whose features are about to come to an end?How is this question received?This line of questioning has typically been handled offline as managers I’ve spoken to didn’t have the answers handy. They were typically fielded by an IT or Dev manager, who was more than happy to see that level of interest from a designer. As a designer, I don’t need to understand the details of my team’s API end-points, but I should understand something about the health of my digital product. Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking DesignerYou are here:center_img Posted on 26th September 2018Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share (mb, ra, yk, il)From our sponsors: Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Joshua Bullock 2018-09-26T13:30:31+02:00 2018-09-26T12:29:21+00:00Whether you’re a multi-year veteran to the UX industry or fresh out of a higher education or boot camp style program, setting out into the job market can be a daunting task for any designer. From freelancing or working for a more boutique studio, doing agency work, or joining the enterprise, a myriad of positions, requirements, and organizations are available for a design practitioner who is looking to take the next steps in their career.In this article, I’ll present a list of questions from my personal experience to consider leading up to and even during the interview process. I’ll also include the goal when asking the questions, basically what you’re trying to learn, along with responses I’ve received when asking them of prospective employers.As with anything, your mileage might vary, but considering these topics before an interview may help you better solidify the perspective on what you are looking for from your next position. It is written primarily from the position of an interviewee, however hiring managers may also find them valuable by looking at their company through that lens and considering them for prospective designers.Recommended reading: The Missing Advice I Needed When Starting My CareerUnderstanding Design MaturityJared Spool and other UX leaders have written a few things about the design maturity of organizations and the ideal distribution of design resources. When considering taking a design position within an organization, how might we look at the company through this lens and better understand where they are on their experience journey? With numerous titles being thrown around (Experience Designer, Product Designer, UI Designer, Interaction Designer, UX Designer, and so on), what might provide additional clarity for the working relationship you’re about to enter into and the role you are about to assume?Having a few years in various design roles, I’ve spent time on both sides of the interview table — both as a hiring manager and as a prospective employee. In every interview I’ve been a part of, be it part of the hiring team or as an interviewee, an opportunity was presented to inquire about the team or organization. “Do you have any questions for us?” is the most common phrase I’ve heard and this presents a golden opportunity to dig deep and gain valuable insights into the dynamics of the team and organization you’re speaking with.Meet SmashingConf New York 2018 (Oct 23–24), focused on real challenges and real front-end solutions in the real world. From progressive web apps, Webpack and HTTP/2 to serverless, Vue.js and Nuxt — all the way to inclusive design, branding and machine learning. With Sarah Drasner, Sara Soueidan and many other speakers. Check all topics and speakers ↬When I am applying, I’m on the verge of entering into a new relationship, and to the best of ability, I want to understand where we are both headed. Just as the organization is investing in me as an individual, I am being asked for a commitment of time, energy, passion, creativity, and least of all artifacts. I would like to understand as much about my partners as possible. Given that no prenuptials exist in the working world, we may eventually part ways, and our engagement should be as profitable as possible for both sides.I’ve asked the aforementioned question many times of prospective candidates, and in some cases, the response has regrettably been completely passed over. The seemingly benign, “Do you have any questions for us?” opening affords any designer a wealth of opportunity to learn more about the company and design engagement. If design solves problems by gathering information, I propose we attend the hiring process as we would any other research effort. Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019last_img read more

first_imgRobredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads Philadelphia was able to keep the game tight by knocking down 16 3-pointers.TIP-INS76ers: A night after taking 29 free throws, an NBA rookie record, Simmons went to the line only four times. … Embiid, Markelle Fultz (right shoulder soreness), T.J. McConnell (sprained AC joint, left shoulder) and Jahlil Okafor (individualized training) were not with the team.Celtics: Marcus Smart left in the fourth quarter with pain in his right ankle. He got treatment in the locker room and said afterward that it was feeling better. … Irving had five of Boston’s 12 3-pointers. … Boston outscored Philadelphia 44-36 in the paint.QUOTABLE“He’s certainly one of the most gifted scorers in the game. He can do things just with a tiny amount of space and make it look easy.” — Stevens on Irving.RUNNING TIMEThe Celtics ended the second quarter on an 11-3 run and took a 54-44 lead into halftime. Boston shot 48 percent from the field and was 7 of 16 from beyond the 3-point line.Philadelphia erased a 12-point deficit and took a 67-65 lead in the third quarter, but Boston got hot again, ending that period on an 11-4 run that included six points by Morris.TOUGH SCHEDULEThe Sixers have already played some of the league’s top teams just 21 games into the season. Thursday was their second meeting with the Celtics, and they’ve also played Golden State and Houston twice, and Cleveland.But coach Brett Brown is thankful for the tough road they’ve plodded thus far.“We’re playing NBA royalty right now,” Brown said. “We’re playing against the league’s best. The analytics people tell us we’ve had the most difficult schedule to date in the NBA, and it feels like that. But I think it expedites learning. … You’re always learning from All-Stars.”UP NEXT76ers: Begin a three-game homestand Saturday against the Detroit Pistons. Boston Celtics’ Kyrie Irving holds off Philadelphia 76ers’ Jerryd Bayless during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game in Boston on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)BOSTON — Isaiah Thomas developed a reputation in Boston for big performances late in games. It’s quickly becoming apparent that the Celtics probably have an even more potent scoring weapon in Kyrie Irving.The star guard scored 36 points and Boston held off the weary and short-handed Philadelphia 76ers 108-97 on Thursday night to improve the NBA’s best record to 19-4.ADVERTISEMENT It was Irving’s fifth game this season with 30 or more points. Al Horford added 21 points and eight rebounds, and Marcus Morris had 17 points as the Celtics bounced back from Monday night’s home loss to Detroit with their ninth victory in 11 games.“It’s go time, man,” Irving said of his mindset in the fourth quarter. “Especially when the game is in the balance. It’s the best time to play. It’s just ultimate freedom.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingBoston led by five at the end of the third quarter but started the fourth by connecting on seven of its first 11 shots to increase the margin to 95-82. Irving had nine points in the final 12 minutes.“It’s a luxury. Not a lot of teams have that,” Horford said of Irving’s ability to take over games. “His will to win and make those shots when we need them most — it just keeps impressing me game by game.” Dario Saric led Philadelphia with 18 points. JJ Redick finished with 17 and Ben Simmons had 15.“Kyrie is obviously amazing,” Redick said. “Horford doesn’t get enough credit for how good he is offensively. As good as Kyrie is, Horford is the hub of everything they do.”It was the third game in four nights for the 76ers, who have lost two of three. Saturday’s game against Detroit will conclude a week featuring matchups with the East’s three top teams.Philadelphia played without center Joel Embiid, who continues to rest on the second night of back-to-backs.With Embiid out, Celtics coach Brad Stevens went with a bigger lineup, starting Aron Baynes in place of Morris.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim LeBron ‘bothered’ that some teammates disapproved of Wade signing Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Celtics: Continue their five-game homestand Saturday against the Phoenix Suns.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims LATEST STORIES MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 Malditas save PH from shutout Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 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first_imgThe preceding womens final between Thai shuttler The preceding womens final between Thai shuttler Pornpawee and Malaysian top seed Jing drew better response from the crowd at the Cricket Club of India. Thailand no. 5 Pornpawee dropped the first game 16-21 before exhibiting excellent court-craft with her drops and flicks to the base to catch her opponent on the wrong foot often to win the next two 21-11 21-15 to win her second international singles title at the senior level.”I had beaten her in the Australian Grand Prix,” said the rising Thai shuttler based in Bangkok, adding she had won her first international title at the Australian international challenge five months ago.There was a huge upset in the mixed doubles contested by two Indian pairs when the unheralded duo of Satwolsairaj Rankireddy and K Manisha overcame their second-seeded rivals, Arun Vishnu and Aparna Balan 21-13 21-16 in the final. The results (all finals): Womens singles: 2-Pornpawee Chochuwong (Thai) bt 1-Jing Yi Tee (Mas) 16-21 21-11 21-15. Mens singles: 3-Sameer Verma (Ind) bt Sourabh Verma (Ind) 21-11 21-18. Mixed doubles: Satwiksairaj Rankireddy/K Maneesha (Ind) bt Arun Vishnu/Aparna Balan (Ind) 21-13 21-16. Womens doubles: 1-Chaladchalam Chayanit/Phataimas Muenwong (Tha) bt K Maneesha/N Sikki Reddy (Ind) 21-11 15-21 21-13. Mens doubles: Wannawat Ampunsuwan/Tinn Irsiyante (Thai) bt Pranaav Jerry Chopra/Akshay Dewalkar 21-14 21-9. PTI SSR NRB CM CMlast_img read more

first_imgEngland defeated Colombia 4-3 in a shootout to set up a quarter-final against Sweden in World Cup 2018.Mateus Uribe and Carlos Bacca failed to convert for Colombia as Eric Dier slotted home the winning penalty for EnglandIt was the first time Colombia had been involved in a World Cup shootout and they took first blood when Jordan Henderson missed his spot kick – but for once fortune smiled on England.It is the furthest England has progressed in any tournament since the David Beckham era, when a golden generation of players exited the 2002 and 2006 World Cups in the last eight.Colombia vs England: HIGHLIGHTSEarlier Harry Kane smashed in a 57th-minute penalty, his sixth goal of the tournament, and England looked to be through until Yerry Mina headed an equaliser in the third minute of stoppage time.Colombia’s hopes suffered a huge setback before kickoff when key playmaker James Rodriguez was ruled out with a calf injury and without him they took a defensive approach and never rarely threatened. England were always the more purposeful side but they lacked the key final ball and needed a gift to take the lead.2018 FIFA WORLD CUP: FULL COVERAGEThe South Americans had been getting away with blatant holding and wrestling at each of England’s many corners and the referee’s patience finally snapped when Carlos Sanchez hauled down tournament leading scorer Kane once too often.After four minutes of mayhem as the Colombians protested, Kane kept his cool and smashed in his third spot kick of Russia 2018.advertisementIn the stoppage time, England keeper Jordan Pickford made a superb save to touch wide a furious long shot by Uribe but from the following corner – Colombia’s first of the match – giant defender Mina rose highest to head in the equaliser and send the massed Colombian fans into a frenzy.Earlier, Emil Forsberg’s deflected goal gave Sweden a 1-0 victory over Switzerland, sending them through to the World Cup quarter-finals.Both teams were wasteful in possession and guilty of the sort of poor finishing and unimaginative midfield play that had boos and whistles ringing around the St Petersburg stadium from as early as the 25th minute.Switzerland came into the match as the side with arguably the greater wealth of attacking talent, but their four shots on target over the 90 minutes told its own story.Sweden vs Switzerland: HIGHLIGHTSSweden had one attempt fewer on target, with the only difference being that one effort took a heavy deflection and wrong-footed Swiss goalkeeper Yann Sommer to send the Swedes into the next round.The Swedes were happy to pack midfield as they have done for the entire tournament and shepherd the Swiss down the wings, surrendering possession while looking to pinch a goal on the counter.Both teams had opportunity to open the scoring in the first-half but none of them could capitalise.Marcus Berg forced a fine save from Sommer in the 27th minute while Blerim Dzemaili wasted Switzerland’s best chance when he fired over from 12 metres.The second half started in a similarly stultifying manner, with the game looking like it was inching inevitably towards extra time and potentially a penalty shootout.But it all changed in the 66th minute as Forsberg’s shot which was directed straight at Sommer deflected off Manuel Akanji past his stranded keeper.Switzerland sparked into life after going behind, but Sweden defended stoutly, making 33 clearances and nine blocks in total, while completing fewer than half the number of passes that their opponents did.England break penalty shootout droughtIt was for the first time that England won a penalty shootout in a World Cup match. They had lost all three earlier penalty shootouts.With Pickford saving Bacca’s penalty, he became the first English goalkeeper to save a penalty in a penalty shoot-out at a major tournament since David Seaman at World Cup 1998 against Argentina. Seaman had denied Hernan Crespo that day in Saint-Ettiene. But, Argentina won the match 4-3 on penalties.READ FULL STORY Kane sets new goalscoring recordWith his 57th minute goal against Colombia, Kane became the first England player to score in his first three World Cup matches. He’s also the first Englishman to score in six consecutive international matches since Tommy Lawton in 1939.Mina matches Paul BreitnerThe goal against England was Mina’s third in this World Cup. He has now equalled the World Cup record for most goals by a defender in a single World Cup, which was set by Germany’s Paul Breitner in 1974.advertisementThe stoppage time goal was also the 99th goal scored after the 90th minute in World Cup history. On the other hand, it was the first time England conceded a goal in the stoppage time in a World Cup match.Pickford’s homework comes in handyPickford said he had done his homework to try not to follow a succession of England goalkeepers to walk off the loser after a shootout.”I did all my research. I’ve got power and agility. I don’t care if I’m not the biggest keeper because it’s about being there in the moment and making the save and I was,” Pickford said.”It’s all about the set position and I got a hand to it. We knew we had this game, even if it had to go to penalties, we knew we were capable of winning.”Dier says England never panicked Eric Dier said England just kept calm and didn’t panic as his successful penalty helped England beat Colombia.”To get knocked down like we did is difficult to come back from it,” Dier said after Yerry Mina had equalised for the Colombians in stoppage time to force the match into goalless extra time.”We knew what we had to do and we stayed calm,” he added after the 4-3 shootout win. “We never panicked. We were ready for that.”Forsberg terms his goal the biggest of his careerSweden’s goal scorer Forsberg was on the seventh heaven after leading his team into the quarter-finals.”It’s the biggest goal of my career, one of the biggest moments in my career too. To experience this, to fire Sweden into the quarter-finals together with this group, it feels fantastic,” said Forsberg.READ FULL STORYForsberg’s goal was scored on his 14th shot in this World Cup. No player in this edition has had more without scoring.Swedish coach praises his teamJanne Andersson said his team’s work ethics has helped them reach the quarter-finals.”This team personifies the approach we all share – we work for each other on and off the pitch, and I’m incredibly happy that it’s paying off,” Andersson told reporters. The Swedes have now seen off Netherlands from their qualifying group, Italy in a playoff, Germany at the group stage and Switzerland in the last 16, leading to questions about whether other nations have underestimated Andersson and his men.”I think you’d have to ask everyone else that question. We know we are a good team, that we’ve earned our successes – we know how we got this far,” the 55-year-old explained.”We’ve worked this way throughout, we’re continuing the same way, and what other teams and countries think about that is not terribly interesting.”Sweden win brings an end to a 24-year waitSweden have reached the quarter-finals of a World Cup for the first time since 1994, when the team reached the semi-finals.READ FULL STORYThis is also the first time since 1958 that the European nation won back-to-back matches in a World Cup. In their previous match they had defeated Mexico 3-0 in the Group F match.advertisementThe match against Switzerland was Sweden’s 50th at the World Cup finals. Only Mexico (57) have played more matches than them without ever winning the tournament.(With Reuters inputs)last_img read more