first_imgWomen in the private sector have away to go to catch up with the progresstheir peers in the public sector have made. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Jeanette Hern  Partner, Grant Thornton Johannesburg  +27 11 322 4562 • Lesley Ann Foster  Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre  +27 43 743 9169 or +27 83 325 2497 RELATED ARTICLES • Empowerment for SA’s women• Women’s rights in SA to advance • Towards gender equality in SA • NGO fights for gender equality in SAShamin ChibbaSouth African women are making strides in the country’s private sector in terms of taking up senior positions, according to a recent international survey.The 2012 Grant Thornton International Business Report, which surveys trends in privately held businesses in 40 economies around the world, stated that 28% of senior management positions in South Africa were held by women.This is higher than the global average of 21%.Grant Thornton’s corporate finance head in Johannesburg, Jeanette Hern, said that this strong representation is indicative of the country’s progress towards gender equality.The percentage actually indicates an improvement from 27% last year. However, it falls just short of 2007’s figure of 29%.Creative ways to accommodate womenHern said, however, that more needs to be done for that figure to increase.“We need more innovative solutions in order to make a significant dent in the number of women still excluded from senior management,” she said.This includes finding more creative ways to accommodate women in the workplace. Hern said that just 39% of women surveyed in South Africa said that their businesses offer working conditions that accommodated flexible hours and alternative working locations.Also, the research found that women were not represented across a spectrum of management roles. Most were either human resource or finance directors.Just 8% of CEOs and 9% of COOs were women but according to Hern, this is an improvement from 2011, when only 3% of women held positions at these levels.Women have progressed, but can progress moreAccording to Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre’s executive director, Lesley Ann Foster, the exact number of women in leadership roles should be taken into consideration when analysing such statistics.Foster says that taken in context, the figures leave much room for improvement – but acknowledged that women have progressed in the past decade and they have occupied many senior positions, although not yet to a satisfactory degree.“Women make up 53% of the population so they should at least take up 50% of leadership positions but this is not happening,” she said.Foster was clear about the benefits that equality between men and women will have on society. She said that in a society where women are on an equal basis with men progress is quicker, the standard of living is higher and quality of life improves.“Women bring a lot of expertise and value to life,” she said. “If a woman works, the whole family and the community benefit. To be on par with men, women should receive decent work, decent pay.”Private sector must catch upFoster referred to studies done by the Businesswomen’s Association of South Africa (BWASA) in 2010, which stated that there are millions of women who are either unemployed or earn very little.The BWASA research indicates that 64% of women earned less than R1 000 per month, 80% earned less than R2 500 and more alarmingly, only 45% of women were employed. In addition, 53% of black women are currently unemployed.She also said that there are not enough women from previously disadvantaged backgrounds in leadership positions.BWASA East London’s chairperson, Lizelle Maurice, agreed with Foster’s sentiments, saying that while women have progressed tremendously in the public domain, with 47% being represented in government, they are still lagging within the private sector.When speaking of ways to ensure women are given a greater chance to participate within business, Maurice said: “Black economic empowerment status should also have a gender component.”last_img read more

first_imgThey are only four counties: Brazil, Russia, India and China, the so-called BRIC countries. Today their economies still are fairly small compared to the US, Europe and Japan. IDC estimates the total global IT market to be $1.16trn compared to $85.1bn for BRIC. But that is changing quickly. By 2050, 44 percent of the world’s GDP will be generated from those four countries, and by that time 18 of the planet’s 20 largest cities will be located outside North America and Western Europe.Jonathan Schwartz, CEO for Sun, sees BRIC as a tremendous opportunity. Of course, Sun is not alone in pursuing the this huge growing market. But unlike Oracle, IBM, Microsoft and many others that are investing in these countries, Sun has a different approach: Open Source. Schwartz sees Sun’s investment in Open Source hardware and software as eventually paying off big time. But in the short term, Sun isn’t seeking huge growth in revenues from these developing nations. It will take much time and patience.Schwartz said that “gain in revenue will be a derivative of market share gain in adoption”. Sun is following Red Hat’s model where economic success followed a period of growth and acceptance by the open source community. Sun will be increasing their presence in these countries over the next three to five years.One example of their approach is with recent negotiations that they’ve had with the Chinese government to adopt the design for a computer processor contributed by Sun to the Open Source community. It’s not clear that high adoption rates of Open Source projects will lead to eventual long-term revenues, but the approach sets Sun apart from other companies.“We are trying to focus in on the next wave of developers, next wave of students, the next wave of research, the next wave of economic growth to best position Sun for growth in the next decade, not the next few weeks or next quarter,” said Schwartz.It’s a refreshing approach, compared to most of corporate America’s focus on short-term revenue and growth.last_img read more

first_imgFor the second year in a row, visitors to Chicago’s Printers Row Lit Fest had the chance to learn about free markets, individual liberty, and limited government. Among the many Baby-Boomer communist booksellers that line the street during the annual weekend festival, AFF’s Chicago leadership team stood proudly, distributing copies of F.A. Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, Leonard Reed’s “I, Pencil,” and Frederic Bastiat’s masterpiece, The Law.In addition to chatting with passersby about current events and the philosophy of freedom, AFF also offered visitors a chance to discover where they landed on the World’s Smallest Political Quiz. After taking ten questions, visitors could be placed in one of five distinct quadrants: libertarian, conservative, liberal, centrist, and statist. Although most landed in the left-liberal quadrant, many were surprised to land in the libertarian area given that they either were unfamiliar with the word or had a misunderstanding of it.AFF-Chicago committee member John Yackley provided an overview of the results at the end of the second day of the festival. AFF color-coded stickers by quiz-takers’ guesstimated ages: red is Millennials (and younger), green is Gen Xers, yellow is Baby Boomers, and blue represents members of the “Greatest Generation” (senior citizens).Watch a video of the results here.You’ll notice most Boomers end up in the left-liberal quadrant, while younger folk tend to be left-liberal to libertarian.AFF gathered nearly 100 email addresses at the festival and gave away dozens of copies of Hayek and Bastiat’s work to interested young people. Many books came courtesy of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, so our thanks go to them for their support.AFF expects to appear again next year at the festival to open more minds to the ideas of freedom.For more information on AFF’s Chicago chapter, join our Facebook page.last_img read more

first_imgCustomers. Do you know who your customer is? I do. I know my target market and can define my customer. I’m not marketing to everyone. Who are the companies you are marketing to, the people who will be most receptive to your messages, and how will you serve them? What are their ages, desires, needs and pain points?All this data will help you create an impressive resume. But they’re also the statistics you should know today, whether you’re walking into a meeting or sitting down with your boss to evaluate your progress or justify a budget increase.Before you use this data to polish up your resume, think about how you can put that data to work every day on the job.3 tools to organize your data for success1. A monster dashboardIf you aren’t an Excel expert, become one. My master spreadsheet has 40 different tabs in it. Get to know your dashboard reporting tool, whether you use Salesforce or a CRM or an e-commerce tool. Be the expert in pulling the essential data. Carry that data into your meetings and update it regularly.The dashboard will help you focus on what’s important and what you need to know. Talk to other people in your organization if you need to fill in blanks.2. DIY metricsYour dashboard should show your organization’s KPIs, such as the percentage of leads converted to purchase, but you also need your own set of metrics that show your email success on your own terms.Statistics like time to purchase, subscriber/customer lifetime or percentage of quality leads might not be important to your executives, but you need them to be a good marketer.If your dashboard doesn’t give you those metrics, then create your own.That’s what I ended up doing earlier in my career because I wasn’t getting the numbers I needed to show how my programs were succeeding. I ended up with 15 pages of numbers that tracked different pieces of the business. I took them into every meeting and was able to rattle them off from memory because I knew the numbers intimately.3. StorytellingThe best job candidates I interviewed told compelling stories. If you want to advocate more effectively for your email program, you will know your story inside and out and tell it in ways that your audience will understand.Knowing your story will help you clarify what you send prospects, subscribers and customers. You also must know how to tailor your story for different audiences. This is crucial if you’re introducing your brand to a new audience, as I did when I brought a UK brand into the US market.Note: Update your story daily. Telling the same story over and over makes it go stale. Update it regularly with fresh data. It might take you 25 minutes to write your story but four days to tweak it.The power of knowing your numbers is important, especially in larger organizations. I learned this the day my boss asked me for some numbers that I didn’t have at my fingertips. He said something I never forgot:“If you don’t know these numbers, who does? Because that’s who I want to talk to.”Wrapping upAs an email marketer, you are your own CEO, CFO, COO and front-line person. Act like it. Know your data and use it to create a compelling story. Craft a version of it so that you have an answer the next time someone says, “How’s our email program doing?”The post The business stats you must have on instant recall appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: The business stats you must have on instant recall After re-entering the job market recently, updating my resume was one of the first things I did. I am a numbers guy, so I started thinking about the metrics that would best highlight my accomplishments.Which KPIs would impress my industry and the top decision-makers in it? What statistics did I use every day on the job?See, I wasn’t just a pretty face on the speaker’s platform at marketing conferences. I headed up US marketing operations for a UK-based email service provider. I carried metrics like these, and many more, into team and client meetings and executive sessions and used them to build out my marketing plans.Then, as I compiled my stats, I had an epiphany.I realized that these big-picture stats aren’t just for your resume. These are the numbers you should be carrying around in your head every day on the job. They’re the stats that help you demonstrate the value and effectiveness of your email program.If someone — like your CEO — were to stop you in the hall and ask, “How’s our email program really doing?” would you have a ready answer? Or would you stumble over a vague statement about open rates and opt-ins?Everyday statistics to carry around in your headThese stats serve me well, both on the job and when I’m summing up my career highlights to date:Testing. In my previous job, we did a lot of cool things to inform our account-based management using test data to inform the ads we showed our prospects so that we could better drive them to our web pages to capture their information. Engagement. What drives engagement? I know which subject lines got the most opens and which emails drove the most clicks. Email success is about more than opens and a good marketer knows what persuades people to open and engage. Best and worst campaigns. You know your victories, but talk about your flops, too. Everybody has them. Show what you learned from your failure and how you avoided repeating it. For me, it was a $10,000 campaign with a new ad tech company. It failed miserably, but I stopped the campaign before I spent all the company’s money. Posted on 4th August 2018Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share The business stats you must have on instant recallYou are here: KPIs. When I’m on the job, our net sales and opportunity value are constantly in my head. Things like open rates, click rates, conversion rates, number of segments and average order value. What were my goals and what percentage of them did I accomplish? Retention. How did I retain those prospects, customers or subscribers? What are my retention rates quarterly or over a year? What’s the average retention or burnout in the same period? When did I know it was time to stop marketing to a prospect? HomeDigital MarketingThe business stats you must have on instant recall Acquisition. As a B2B marketer, I need to show how many high-quality leads and customers I acquired. For B2C marketers, how many subscribers or customers did you acquire each month? How many converted to purchase in the first 15 or 30 days? What are your lows, highs and averages? Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019last_img read more

first_imgAfter 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads Experiencing traffic? Book a ‘ride-sharing flight’ to your destination PLAY LIST 01:02Experiencing traffic? Book a ‘ride-sharing flight’ to your destination01:35U.S. urges Japan, South Korea to share intel01:34After polls, Poe shares light moment with her staff02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH View comments ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay Clutch Go delivers anew for Blue Eagles Malditas save PH from shutout Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ LATEST STORIES Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Photo from Fiba.comGilas Pilipinas will parade the same lineup it used against Japan when it faces Chinese Taipei on Monday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.Leading the way for the Philippines are naturalized center Andray Blatche and star guard Jayson Castro.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Also part of the roster are June Mar Fajardo, Gabe Norwood, Calvin Abueva, Japeth Aguilar, Allein Maliksi, Troy Rosario, Kevin Alas, Roger Pogoy, Matthew Wright, and Kiefer Ravena.READ: Gilas shakes off Japan to start World Cup qualifiers campaignFEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThe Philippines is coming off a 77-71 win over Japan on Friday in Tokyo to start its campaign in the Fiba World Cup qualifiers.Meanwhile, Chinese Taipei hopes to bounce back after suffering a humiliating 104-66 loss to Australia in its home court.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Police on Sunday said that three persons were arrested for beating a pregnant woman on suspicion of child kidnapping in North East Delhi’s Harsh Vihar area.Police identified the accused as Deepak (27), B Shakuntala (52) and Lalit Kumar (29). All the accused are the residents of Mandoli. Deputy Commissioner of Police (Northeast) Atul Kumar Thakur said a case has been registered at the Harsh Vihar police station under Indian Penal Code sections for voluntarily causing hurt and wrongful restraint. “The victim is deaf and we have registered a case. The suo motu was taken by police,” said DCP Thakur. In the social media an alleged video of the incident taking rounds. According to police, further investigation in the case is going on to check the involvement of other people who were present at the spot.last_img read more