Stratford girls basketball cruises past Greenwood

first_imgGriesbach pours in 24 points for TigersBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterGREENWOOD — Sammy Griesbach scored 24 points, and Macie Frueh added 13 as the Stratford girls basketball team rolled past Greenwood 61-42 in a nonconference game Thursday at Greenwood High School.The Tigers led 26-18 at halftime and built on their lead from there as they improve to 13-4. Greenwood drops to 2-12.Andie Zuelke added 10 points for Stratford, eight coming in the second half.Stratford is at Wisconsin Rapids Assumption on Tuesday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Tigers 61, Indians 42Stratford 26 35 – 61Greenwood 18 24 – 42STRATFORD (61): Savannah Schillinger 2 3-4 8, Taya Nett 2 0-0 4, Sammy Griesbach 11 2-3 24, Macie Frueh 5 2-4 13, Olivia Burrows 0 0-0 0, Chelsey Gliniecki 0 0-2 0, Kaylee Hollatz 1 0-0 2, Andie Zuelke 4 2-2 10. FG: 25. FT: 9-15. 3-pointers: 2 (Frueh 1, Schillinger 1). Rebounds: 25 (Schillinger 7, Griesbach 7). Turnovers: 13. Fouls: 19. Fouled out: Zuelke. Record: 13-4.GREENWOOD (42): Kassidy Lamovec 2 2-3 6, Kaylee Meyer 2 0-0 4, Kaitlyn Fleischmann 0 0-0 0, Kelly Nielsen 2 3-7 7, Renee Hendrich 1 0-0 2, Kristyn Nigon 1 4-4 6, Ashley Walker 2 0-0 4, Lexi Hinker 1 0-0 2, Kaylee Learman 3 3-4 11. FG: 14. FT: 12-18. 3-pointers: none. Fouls: 12. Fouled out: none. Record: 2-12.last_img read more

Facebook Adds New Apple TV And WatchOS SDKs To Parse

first_imgThis week Facebook company Parse announced the launch of new Parse software development kits (SDKs) for Apple’s tvOS and watchOS 2, so Facebook developers can build immersive apps for the Apple TV and the Apple Watch. Parse previously released support for the Apple Watch and App Extensions in April, which enabled developers to build apps with extensions running on Apple Watch alone—without having to rely on a constant connection to an iPhone. More recently, the company announced the open sourcing of its SDKs in August. A major challenge  faced  by Parse was local storage with tvOS, and it decided to re-architect local data persistence from the iOS SDK. In response to the problem of logging into apps via tvOS (difficult without a regular keyboard), the Facebook integration library has been updated to let users login to tvOS apps using the Facebook tvOS SDK by using just a few lines of code. Both new SDKs, as well as the updated Facebook integration library are available on GitHub. Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T… These Mistakes Can Derail a Legacy Software Con… Cate Lawrence Why Your Company’s Tech Transformation Starts W…center_img Related Posts How AI is Learning to Play with Words Tags:#Apple#Apple TV#Facebook#parse#SDK#TvOS#Watch OS last_img read more

How a Pennsylvania industrial engineer became the odds-on favorite to win a seat in Congress

first_img By Jeffrey MervisMay. 8, 2018 , 9:00 AM Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidatesPHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA—Before Chrissy Houlahan decided to run for Congress in southeastern Pennsylvania, she made a list of things she felt anyone serving in that body needed to understand. At the top were how to protect the country, how to grow the economy, and how to educate the nation’s children.Houlahan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and a master’s degree in technology policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, realized she was well-suited to tackle all three questions with her experience as a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, an executive with two successful startup companies, and a chemistry teacher in an urban high school. But before throwing her hat into the ring, Houlahan applied one more lesson from her time in the classroom, on the job, and in the military: She gamed out a way to win the election.Some 15 months later, Houlahan has implemented that plan to perfection. Thanks in part to a near-flawless campaign and prodigious fundraising, she is now the only Democrat on the 15 May primary ballot for Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district (PA-6), an area southwest of here. Because of some good fortune, she’s also a heavy favorite to win the general election in November for what is now an open seat.The 50-year-old Houlahan says she isn’t afraid of competition. “But it’s very draining if there are lots of us [Democrats] fighting among ourselves” in the primary election, she notes. And although she says her ultimate goal is to turn the district “from a red dot to a blue dot,” it’s no secret that she wants to be that blue dot.“Our system is in desperate straits, and you can either run away and hide or try to be part of the solution,” she says. When asked why she chose Congress for her first foray into politics, rather than a local post, she doesn’t mince words. “I don’t have time for that. The stakes are too high, and I think I’m qualified.” How a Pennsylvania industrial engineer became the odds-on favorite to win a seat in Congress Public health scientist hopes to take his activism to Congress Pennsylvania is a key battleground in the fight for control of the next Congress, and scientists are in the middle of that fight. In February, the state’s highest court threw out a Republican-drawn map of the state’s 18 congressional districts and installed one that, for the most part, eliminates partisan gerrymandering. Those new districts helped push some Republican incumbents into retirement, while at the same time prompting many first-time Democratic candidates to run for seats that now appear winnable.The result is a political free-for-all in which veteran campaign watchers are hedging their bets on who the winners might be. “I haven’t seen a single poll, and without a poll, you can’t begin to make a guess,” says political scientist Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall College (F&M) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center for Politics and Public Affairs and runs the F&M Poll. A crowded field, he says, simply adds to the confusion. This story is the second in a three-part series on candidates with considerable scientific training who are running as Democrats for the U.S. House of Representatives in Pennsylvania. Their first test is the 15 May primary.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Chrissy Houlahan makes her pitch to voters in Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district. Kelly Schulz center_img The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates Postdoc hopes Pennsylvania voters will help her re-engineer how to run for Congress The science vote No more flying soloAsk Houlahan about her childhood, and her answer—“I grew up everywhere”—reflects her military upbringing. Houlahan’s father and one of her grandfathers were U.S. Navy pilots, and her dad’s job flying P-3 Orion antisubmarine reconnaissance planes meant the family would always be along the water. By the time she was a teenager, Houlahan was a certified scuba diver, an open-water swimmer, and a budding marine biologist. Her easy access to both oceans and sky, combined with a strong parental push to study science, led her to put astronaut at the top of her career choices.In her mind, the process began by becoming a pilot. She won an Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship to attend Stanford. However, the military was not welcome on campus when she arrived there in 1985. So every Friday, Houlahan was one of 20 Stanford undergraduates who would pile into cars and drive 40 kilometers to San Jose State University for daylong training.Hostility to the military wasn’t the only obstacle she had to overcome. Engineering classes were typically offered Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—and Houlahan said Stanford made no attempt to accommodate the ROTC students who would be absent. “So ROTC meant you were basically missing one-third of your classes, for 4 years,” she recalls. “And that made it pretty hard to be a very good student.”The size of the ROTC class would eventually dwindle to four, with Houlahan as the only woman. And although her military heritage helped her persevere—“I knew exactly what I was setting myself up for,” she says—she made an unorthodox decision when the Air Force offered her one of its highly competitive slots for pilot training.“I turned them down,” she says. “I had already started dating my husband and was hoping that we would end up making a life together. I had grown up in a wandering lifestyle in which we moved every year. He wasn’t going into the military, and I visualized what his life would be like if I were in the military.”Her classmates and Air Force officials couldn’t believe it, she recalls. “I remember the Air Force was pretty disappointed, and my ROTC cadre was stunned. But it was a lifestyle choice. And we’ve been married for 28 years, so I think I made the right one.”After graduation, Houlahan spent 3 years at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts, which focuses on electronic communications systems. There she worked on air and space defense technologies “one or more generations in the future.” The challenges included figuring out “what types of information people need, and in what order, and with what visual displays, when ballistic missiles are raining down on you” and “how to communicate in a postnuclear war environment.”Corner office to the classroomAfter leaving the military, she made use of her MIT degree, which combined business and engineering courses, to help her husband run a fledgling sports apparel company, AND1. The startup, based here, soon grew to rival industry leader Nike. Its socially responsible benefits included 40 hours of paid community service annually for every employee, which Houlahan invariably used to improve educational opportunities for underserved populations. “And for me,” she says, “that meant women and girls in STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] and communities of color.”Eventually, she decided that she needed to experience the problems facing the nation’s public schools before she could hope to have any impact. So she left an executive position at another startup her husband had co-founded and enrolled in a program for lifelong learners at the University of Pennsylvania, retaking chemistry and taking biology for the first time. She also was accepted into Teach for America, an on-the-job training program that placed her at Simon Gratz High School, a storied but troubled school here.For someone used to working in a corner office, Simon Gratz was an eye-opening experience. “We had some labs, but we didn’t have access to them for most of the year,” she says. A bigger problem, she soon realized, was that “teaching science to kids who are reading really, really below grade level is an impossibility. And my kids were reading at the third or fourth grade level.”Although Teach for America fellows, who are often fresh out of college, must stay in the classroom for 2 years to earn their teaching degree, Houlahan left the program after 1 year. She had learned enough, she says, to understand the importance of literacy in tackling many of the problems facing urban schools. She then joined Springboard Collaborative, a nonprofit based here that aims to improve literacy by creating a year-round learning environment for students that extends into the home and community.A wall of moneyHoulahan says that she and her husband have emphasized to their three children, now adults, the importance of putting their talents to the “highest, best use.” After Donald Trump was elected president, she says, she applied that imperative to herself.“I was raised to respect the democratic process, and the will of the people, and whoever is your commander in chief,” she says. “And this was the first time that I felt I couldn’t do that.”Anticipating that her response to that dilemma might lead her into electoral politics, Houlahan spent the next 3 months exploring what it would take to run a campaign. One day, she appended a note to a fundraising solicitation from Emily’s List, a nonprofit that supports women running for office and to which she regularly donated small amounts. “I want to run for Congress,” she wrote. “What does it take?”Once she made up her mind, Houlahan hit the ground running. She wanted to learn as much as possible about the district. She also wanted to raise enough money to scare off any challengers.“I wanted to put up as big a defense as I could,” she says, “because it doesn’t do anybody any good to fight among ourselves.” Her strategy has been wildly successful: As of 31 March, Houlahan had raised $2 million, a staggering haul for a political novice in the run-up to a primary.Raising vast amounts is “a necessary evil” for first-time candidates like herself who need to introduce themselves to potential voters, she says. “But it’s also a big part of what’s broken in campaigning.” If voters send her to Washington, D.C., she promises to seek ways “to lessen the role of money and increase transparency in campaigning.”Houlahan has also benefited from forces beyond her control. The two-term incumbent Republican who holds the seat, Representative Ryan Costello, dropped out of the race a week after the 20 March filing deadline. That leaves Greg McCauley, a tax lawyer and neophyte candidate, as the only eligible Republican.In another stroke of good luck for Houlahan, the district in which she is running has become decidedly more Democratic since she declared her candidacy. In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out a map apportioning all 18 congressional seats that was created by the state’s Republican-led legislature. The old PA-6 was nearly evenly split between those who voted for Trump and those who supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential race. But Democrats enjoy a 10-point advantage in the newly redrawn district. As a result, political handicappers have shifted the seat from a toss-up to likely Democrat.If Houlahan wins, she will be looking for opportunities to promote her ideas on national security, the economy, and education. She says she’s “pro-business” but progressive on social issues. She’d also like to explore ways to shorten the campaign season—and lessen the incessant need to raise money.“I have been campaigning for 18 months for a job that, if I win, I will hold for 2 years,” she says wearily. “And as near as I can tell, I’ll start fundraising to get re-elected the day after I’m sworn in.”Even so, Houlahan is looking forward to meeting some kindred spirits in Washington, D.C. “I’m hopeful that, if I get elected, there will be a lot of people like me who want to be part of a wave of change. And if there are enough of us, maybe we’ll have the opportunity to make a difference.”*Correction, 9 May, 10:53 p.m.: This story has been updated to correct Houlahan’s age.last_img read more

Romelu Lukaku rounds off easy Manchester United win against Stoke

first_img Twitter Manchester United 3-0 Stoke City: Premier League – as it happened Barney Ronay Stoke City Facebook Manchester United took advantage of Manchester City’s defeat at Liverpool to close the deficit to 12 points with this accomplished win. It is still a chasm but José Mourinho and co will feel better and the club will be boosted further should they secure Alexis Sánchez, with them now firmly in pole position to do so. Paul Lambert, the newly appointed Stoke City manager, watched on from the posh seats but saw United again deny the Potters victory here, their last coming in April 1976.Of the display Mourinho said: “I didn’t like the first half. I only like [our] two amazing goals. We were confident and organised but a bit slow. The second half was totally different. We accelerated the game.”The Portuguese made six changes from the FA Cup win here a week ago. Once again Henrikh Mkhitaryan was excluded completely – due to “doubts about his future”, Mourinho said – while Romelu Lukaku started for the first time in more than a fortnight following a head injury.Eddie Niedzwiecki’s XI showed seven players different from the Cup defeat at Coventry City , with Stephen Ireland’s first league start in 996 days notable, alongside the debut of Moritz Bauer, a 25-year-old Austrian. Manchester United spending a fortune to get Alexis Sánchez at 29 makes sense Manchester United This showed that Stoke could get at what was an uncharacteristically open Mourinho team. When Bauer mishit a cross it became an awkward high ball at which De Gea flapped. The ball bounced to Eric Choupo-Moting but the finish lacked composure.This came during a passage of play in which United struggled to escape from their half. When they finally managed this, Lukaku pinged in a cross towards Lingard and a corner was claimed.It came to nothing as did a Mata fall in the area that Bruno Martins Indi believed was a dive, though the No 8 was keen to deny this. At the break, though, Stoke were two behind: Martial’s sweet finish from outside the area coming after Pogba rolled the ball expertly to him.For the second half Niedzwiecki took off Joshua Tymon for Kevin Wimmer. United began with a move that took in Martial, Lingard, Pogba, Lukaku and Mata, the ball struck around with unerring accuracy.To enjoy total control United required a third, given the amount of time remaining. Martial burst through on Butland but the keeper smothered well. Next Pogba – yet again – probed, finding Lukaku. The centre-forward turned and fired a shot that had power but went too easily into Butland’s hands. match reports Read more Share on LinkedIn At this point the travelling support began singing “Paul Lambert’s barmy army”, which will have cheered the watching Scot. He could also be content with the quality his new side had displayed. The confidence shown was hardly that of a side lying third from bottom.Martial was putting in a fine performance but really should have finished from close range yet, once more, he steered the ball straight at Butland. United’s issue of failing, at times, to kill opposition off was again evident when Lingard fed Mata and the forward’s attempted curler missed to Butland’s left.When United put the ball in the net for a third time, on 66 minutes, Mata was adjudged offside. There was no doubt about Lukaku’s later finish, though, the Belgian scoring, under pressure, to close the match out.Of Stoke’s survival hopes, Niedzwiecki said: “It’s a big challenge staying in the Premier League. We’re still in the pack and now’s the time for everyone to get behind the new manager.” Share on Facebookcenter_img Topics Share on Pinterest Pinterest Read more Share on Messenger Reuse this content Share via Email Share on Twitter City’s defeat by Liverpool on Sunday should have been ample inspiration for United to make a bright start. Anthony Martial was the first to do so, roving down the left before hitting in a cross Stoke managed to clear. Bauer’s first act in English top-flight football was to appear to fell Martial in the area as the Frenchman chased a Juan Mata ball. From the turf Martial made the appeal but Anthony Taylor, the referee, was unmoved.So, too, was Jack Butland, when United opened the scoring on nine minutes. This was because the visiting goalkeeper was given zero chance from Antonio Valencia’s vicious swerving left-foot shot that rocketed past him.The captain’s third of the season came courtesy of Paul Pogba’s searing run-then-pass that drove United from near halfway to near goal, before Valencia did the rest.This was the kind of dazzling play United are capable of and which makes the yawning gap to City a puzzle. Mourinho had spoken of the benefit of the warm-weather break in Dubai last week and there was an obvious freshness about United. Yet he will have been unhappy at the space Luke Shaw allowed Bauer to run into when Joe Allen slid the ball down the left-back’s corridor. Suddenly Stoke were in behind but Bauer failed to find a team-mate.Pogba was in imperious form, though. One stepover swept him infield and, when his pass found Jesse Lingard, the No 10 drew a foul. Up stepped Mata from 25 yards but his free-kick crashed into the wall.Ireland’s radar had already gone awry when he found himself in front of David de Gea and pulled the trigger. Again he missed the target. Share on WhatsApp Premier League Anthony Martial scores Manchester United’s second goal in the 38th minute. Photograph: Simon Stacpoole/Offside/Getty Imageslast_img read more

10 months agoBarcelona chief Abidal: Murillo deal won’t hurt our kids

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Barcelona chief Abidal: Murillo deal won’t hurt our kidsby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona chief Eric Abidal insists the arrival of Jeison Murillo will not work against their youth policy.Murillo has arrived on-loan from Valencia.Abidal said, “Our bet on the juniors is still the same, it does not change anything.”Now it’s time to compete and here the coach is happy to welcome him. I hope that in the future players continue to rise as they have done so far.”We are always attentive to what happens in the market.” last_img read more

a month agoMan Utd captain Young: Maguire already a leader

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd captain Young: Maguire already a leaderby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United captain Ashley Young says Harry Maguire is already a squad leader.Maguire was jeered by Leicester City fans throughout United’s 1-0 win at Old Trafford yesterday, but the £80million centre back responded with a fine performance to help his side to a second clean sheet of the season.”You know, I think the manager’s said about him, he talks non-stop, he’s a real leader and he can play as well,” said Young.”The style of play we use, we use the centre-halves a lot to play out from the back and everybody has got confidence in him. And everybody has confidence in Victor [Lindelof], Jonah [Phil Jones], Marcos [Rojo] – all the defenders, all the centre-backs can go in there and do the job.”Again he showed today what a man he is, and I think as a backline we played a really good game.” last_img read more

10 days agoRice appreciates influence of West Ham teammate Wilshere

first_imgRice appreciates influence of West Ham teammate Wilshereby Paul Vegas10 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveDeclan Rice appreciates the influence of West Ham teammate Jack Wilshere.He admits he gets along well with the former Arsenal star.He said, “Me and Jack has been a surprise friendship. We get on so well, we’re like best friends really. I go round to his house and we go for coffee together.“He’s been hindered by injuries, if you look at his career, but his quality cannot be taken away from him. He’s a top player and even to be training with him is crazy because I grew up watching Jack Wilshere putting in performances on Match of the Day and against Lionel Messi in the Champions League in 2010, when he was only a kid. Sometimes I have to pinch myself.“Jack has been great for me as have the other senior lads in the side.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Ohio State GA Gets Trucked By Buckeyes Running Back

first_imgOhio State's players walking onto the field.COLUMBUS, OH – NOVEMBER 03: A general view as the Ohio State Buckeyes enters the field before the game against the Wisconsin Badgers on November 3, 2007 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State defeated Wisconsin 38-17. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)Note to graduate assistants everywhere – most of you cannot stop a collegiate running back who is running at full speed. In the below video, posted by OSU assistant Corey Dennis, graduate assistant Brian Mason, who is standing on the sideline, gets absolutely trucked by a Buckeyes running back during practice. He does his best to brace himself beforehand, but it doesn’t really seem to matter.It looks like the staff is having some fun with the clip. Enjoy:The @S1LVERBULLETS might need to find a new coach… @Mason_BM pic.twitter.com/tGg3WBHe3a— Corey Dennis (@Coreydennis_) December 16, 2015OMG…. https://t.co/fkgZRfFDu8— Mark Pantoni (@markpantoni) December 16, 2015last_img read more

Photos/Video: Clemson Football’s Beach Party Looks Like A Fun Time

first_imgDabo Swinney on the beach for a Clemson beach party.Clemson Beach PartyPlaying in the College Football Playoff isn’t all business and hard work. There’s room for fun and games as well, which it looks like the Clemson Tigers are finding time for today.After practice, Clemson hit the sands for a team beach party. Looking at the photo and video documentation of the event, it sure looks like they had a good time. Great to see Dabo leading #AmazingGrace, @JordanLeggett16 and team to victory in beach volleyball! #ClemsonFamily pic.twitter.com/vgSu4InFJM— Jim Clements (@ClemsonPrez) December 28, 2015The Tigers had some time to relax and enjoy the beach this afternoon! @ClemsonFB #ALLIN #CapitalOneOrangeBowlpic.twitter.com/eonXqeWVvl— Orange Bowl (@OrangeBowl) December 28, 2015Sun, water, sand, jet skis, volleyball, burgers, music… What a time to be a Tiger. #ALLIN at the @OrangeBowl https://t.co/c3tOTvZivK— Clemson Football (@ClemsonFB) December 29, 2015How about Dabo with the spike in beach volleyball?No one got hurt, the weather was great and everyone had fun. Looks like winning all around for the Tigers.last_img read more