first_imgShare This!With miles of walking, heat, and humidity, Walt Disney World is the kind of vacation that you need to get some rest to enjoy. The paradox has always been that to get the most for your money, you’ve got to arrive early and stay late.Now, with the Animal Kingdom’s longer evening hours and Hollywood Studios’ construction closures, it’s possible to sleep in and still see everything in those parks in one day. That means you can alternate full days in Epcot and the Magic Kingdom with relaxed, late starts at the others – even on short trips. A sample 4-day, long weekend might look like this:Full day at Magic KingdomSleep late and visit the Studios or Animal KingdomFull day at EpcotSleep late and visit the park you’ve not yet seenThe key to those sleep-in days is setting up a touring plan with the right FastPass+ choices and times. To get you started, we’ve created new late-start touring plans for the Animal Kingdom and Disney’s Hollywood Studios below.Seth Kubersky and I have tested versions of these plans in the parks already, with different combinations of FastPass reservations. Let us know how they work for you.Late Arrival Animal Kingdom Touring Plan (link)Get FastPass+ reservations for these attractions and general times:Kilimanjaro Safaris 12:00 noon to 1 p.m.Expedition Everest 5:00 pm to 6:00 p.m.DINOSAUR 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.Skip or substitute any attractions that don’t interest you. If you’d like to experience the new nighttime version of the safaris, change the time shown above to something around dusk or later. Then  move the safari step in the plan to an evening time.Arrive at the Animal Kingdom around noon. Pick up a guide map and Times Guide. Sign up for the Wilderness Explorers game as you cross the bridge to Discovery Island.In Africa, take the Kilimanjaro Safaris. Use your FastPass+ reservation.Take the Wildlife Express Train to Conservation Station and Rafiki’s Planet Watch.Tour Conservation Station and Rafiki’s Planet Watch.Take the Wildlife Express Train back to Harambe.Walk the Pangani Forest Exploration Trail.Earn more badges with the Wilderness Explorers activities in Africa.See Festival of the Lion King in AfricaTour the Discovery Island Trails. One entrance is at the end of the bridge between Africa and Discovery Island. The trail ends near the Discovery Island bridge to Asia.In Asia see Flights of Wonder.Ride Expedition Everest using your FastPass+ reservations.Walk the Maharaja Jungle Trek.Eat dinner. My favorite nearby place is Flame Tree Barbecue on Discovery Island.Ride DINOSAUR in Dinoland U.S.A. using your FastPass+ reservations. After this, check FastPass+ availability for Rivers of Light or Kali River Rapids.Ride TriceraTop Spin if you have small children in your group.If time permits before Finding Nemo – The Musical, take a spin on Primeval Whirl. Otherwise, ride after seeing Nemo.See Finding Nemo – The Musical.Ride Kali River Rapids in Asia.See It’s Tough to Be a Bug on Discover Island.See The Awakening, the Rivers of Light show, or The Jungle Book: Alive with Magic.Here’s the Studios plan:Late Arrival Disney’s Hollywood Studios Touring Plan (link)Get FastPass+ reservations for these attractions and general times:For the First Time in Forever: A Frozen Sing-Along Celebration 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Toy Story Mania 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror 2:30 pm to 3:30 p.m.(Fourth Fastpass, while in the park) The Great Movie Ride 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.Skip or substitute any attractions that don’t interest you.Arrive at Disney’s Hollywood Studios around noon. Pick up a guide map and Times Guide.See For the First Time in Forever: A Frozen Sing-Along Celebration using your FastPass+ reservations.Ride Toy Story Mania using your FastPass+ reservations.See the Star Wars: A Galaxy Far, Far Away show at the park’s center stage.See Beauty and the Beast – Live on Stage on Sunset Boulevard.Ride Rock ‘n’ Roller Coaster Starring Aerosmith on Sunset Boulevard.Experience The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror using your FastPass+ reservations.Tour the Star Wars Launch Bay in Animation Courtyard.Take The Great Movie Ride using your FastPass+ reservations.Eat dinner. Backlot Express is a decent nearby choice.See the Indiana Jones Epic Stunt Spectacular in Echo Lake.See Walt Disney: One Man’s Dream on Mickey Avenue. You’ll exit in Animation Courtyard.If time permits, see Voyage of the Little Mermaid in Animation Courtyard.See Star Tours: The Adventure Continues.See Muppet*Vision 3D.See any evening fireworks and the Fantasmic! nighttime show.last_img read more

first_imgA pair of old fishing buddies is now steering the ship at the Scripps Research Institute, one of the world’s largest private basic biomedical research institutes. Today, Steve Kay, formerly the dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles was announced as Scripps’s president, whereas Peter Schultz, currently a Scripps chemist and director of the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr) in San Diego, was named CEO. Kay will be in charge of day-to-day operations, whereas Schultz will lay out Scripps’s long-term strategic plan.The announcement likely brings to a close a contentious chapter at Scripps, which has campuses in San Diego, California, and Jupiter, Florida. Just over a year ago, Scripps faculty led a revolt against the institute’s former leadership amid financial troubles and merger discussions with USC. The appointments also portend a new push aimed at marrying the institute’s historical strength in basic biomedical research with translational medicine designed to turn research leads into novel treatments.“It’s a very exciting move,” says Peter Kim, formerly the head of the Merck Research Laboratories and now a biochemist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. In addition to running Calibr, Schultz previously led the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF), and has been a founder of eight startups involved in using robotics and other high throughput technologies to advance biomedicine and materials science. Before joining USC, Kay also worked with Schultz at Scripps and GNF. Together the pair has raised well over $1 billion in backing from pharma companies, foundations, and private donations in their recent positions.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Scripps is “very fortunate” to have landed both to share the top duties at the institute, Kim says. Phil Baran, a Scripps chemist and member of the search committee that selected Kay and Schultz, agrees. “I think everyone here will be relieved that we have icons charting the course of the ship, which will let us go back to doing science,” he says.The ship’s previous course got a bit turbulent. Last July, Scripps’s board of trustees called off merger talks with USC after the Scripps faculty revolted. The potential marriage was offered as a way out of the red for Scripps, which had seen a sharp drop in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). USC at the time was flush, in the midst of a $6 billion capital campaign. The university also has a medical school, which meant potentially easier access to clinical research for Scripps’s stable of basic biomedical researchers. But Scripps faculty feared loss of autonomy and objected loudly to news of the merger talks. Ultimately, Scripps’s then-President and CEO Michael Marletta resigned, cell biologist Jim Paulson was named as an interim president and CEO, and a search committee was formed to find a new direction.An emphasis on translationThe centerpiece of this new direction, say Kay and Schultz, will be a long-term push into translational research. Like most academic institutions, today Scripps sticks mainly to basic research, discovering the molecular underpinnings of health and disease. Pharmaceutical companies, by contrast, focus most of their efforts at the other end of the drug development pipeline, moving potential drug compounds through human clinical trials into the market. The space between basic science and drug approval—the translational piece—has come to be known as the “valley of death,” because many promising findings never make it to market. Translational researchers must take promising early-stage compounds and go through a host of refinements to improve measures such as how long compounds last in the body and how well they move through the bloodstream, find their targets, and minimize their toxicity.Kay and Schultz say they plan to form alliances with Calibr and other institutes to ease the path for Scripps faculty to do much of this translational research in house. By doing so, they say, this will ensure that more compounds make it into human trials, bring extra licensing royalties into the institute, and, ultimately, improve the lives of patients. “If we are successful, not only are we making new medicines that can help people, we are potentially creating additional financial resources [for Scripps],” Schultz says.Scripps already has a strong track record for getting medicines into the clinic. According to the institute, eight compounds originally discovered at Scripps are now on the market, while another 30 are in various stages of clinical development. Those were developed, in part, as a byproduct of previous alliances in which pharmaceutical companies payed for rights to develop would-be drugs discovered at Scripps, as well as through the more traditional approach of licensing early-stage compounds to startup companies that then raise money to develop them further.That model, particularly finding institutional backing from pharma companies, “probably no longer works,” Schultz says. Today, large pharma companies are more averse to risking money on unproven therapies, and thus more apt to sit on the sidelines until compounds advance at least until early-stage human clinical trials. That forces biotech companies that license compounds to do much of the translational research themselves, something they aren’t always best suited to do.To make matters worse, when research institutes license their promising compounds very early in development, the terms of such deals often aren’t great for the basic researchers. The institute doesn’t get much money, and researchers lose control over what happens to their compounds, says Patrick Griffin, who runs a translational research center at Scripps in Florida. Many compounds then go on to fail—not because they aren’t effective, Griffin adds, but because companies decide to move in a different business direction. “If you can move a [would-be drug] along in a nonprofit, you can nurture it so it has a better opportunity to advance,” Griffin says. “Fewer will fail, and you will have more shots on goal,” of making it to market, he says.Those extra shots are critical, Griffin and others say, because 95% of all would-be drugs fail during development. When costs of the failures are added in, the price of bringing a new drug to market is well over $1 billion. That has not only caused large pharma companies to back away from early-stage drug discovery, but it has forced them to pursue primarily large-market blockbuster drugs for common conditions such as heart disease and cancer, while avoiding medicines for rare diseases.As a nonprofit focused on translational research, Calibr has already begun to change this arrangement in a small way. Today, the institute, which opened in 2012, has a staff of only about 110 people and an annual budget of some $25 million. But thanks to early progress on would-be drugs for neglected diseases, Calibr has already attracted funding from nonprofit foundations such as the Wellcome Trust, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Schultz says the institute expects to put four to six drugs into the clinic over the next year or two.Cutting costsSchultz and Kay plan to take more immediate actions to shore up Scripps’s finances. According to a July report by Fitch, a bond rating agency, Scripps’ finances are “stable.” But the institute has operated in the red for years, and has been forced to cover its deficit by drawing down its endowment, which shrunk from $430 million in fiscal year 2012 to $397 million in fiscal year 2014.One move that could save $12 million annually would be to replace nearly 37,000 square meters of leased lab space with two newly constructed buildings owned by Scripps. Schultz and Kay say they continue to explore an existing plan to raise more than $100 million to pay for the buildings. “That would have a big impact pretty quick,” Griffin says. But ultimately, he says, Scripps’s stability will be decided on how effective Schultz and Kay are in hooking together formerly disparate parts of the drug development pipeline, and how many would-be drugs the fishing buddies manage to snare in their net.*Correction, 18 September, 3:07 p.m.: This story incorrectly identified Scripps as the world’s largest basic biomedical research institute. It is among the world’s largest private biomedical research institutes.last_img read more

first_imgKyle Porter and Carson Cunningham will be live on Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m. to take questions, talk about Oklahoma State against Pittsburgh, make uniform predictions and talk about whatever else you guys want to talk about.You can watch it live right here or on Facebook. We will make it into a podcast later on this afternoon.Also, leave us questions in the comments section! If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

first_imgFive stories in the news for Friday, Feb. 16———PM TRUDEAU’S LATEST TRIP TAKES HIM TO INDIAPrime Minister Justin Trudeau leaves today for a week-long visit to India that is expected to focus primarily on cultural and economic ties between the nations. He’ll meet with a number of Indian CEOs and business leaders, and visit some of India’s biggest tourist sites including the famed Taj Mahal in Agra. Trudeau will not meet with Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh, who has publicly accused members of the Liberal cabinet of being connected to the Sikh separatist movement.———NDP URGED TO CONSIDER LEAP MANIFESTONew Democrats were urged to consider the controversial Leap Manifesto at an event in Ottawa last night on the eve of the party’s biennial convention. The treatise calls for dramatic changes in the economy and has caused deep rifts within the NDP. One key plank of the manifesto is opposition to any new non-renewable energy infrastructure, including pipelines, which is anathema to the NDP government in Alberta and its efforts to build the Trans Mountain Pipeline.———LEGAL POT WON’T HIT SHELVES BEFORE AUGUSTCanadians will have to wait until at least early August — and maybe as late as early September — to legally purchase recreational marijuana. Senators have struck a deal to hold a final vote by June 7 on legislation to launch the legal cannabis regime. Assuming the bill is passed by the Senate by that date, royal assent would follow almost immediately. But it would take another two or three months before legal weed was actually available for purchase.———MARC GARNEAU VOWS LASER CRACKDOWNTransport Minister Marc Garneau has told his officials to explore “all possible options” to crack down on the dangerous practice of aiming laser pointers at aircraft. A federal official says that could include banning certain types of lasers outright. The number of laser incidents has actually dropped by 25 per cent since Garneau initiated a public education campaign two years ago, but he says even one incident is too many.———MIXED DAY FOR CANADA IN PYEONGCHANGCanada’s Rachel Homan is still searching for her first curling win at the Winter Olympics. The Ottawa skip fell to a surprising 0-3 with an extra-end 9-8 loss to Denmark today. Canada is the only winless rink in the women’s draw. Canadian figure skater Patrick Chan, meanwhile, stumbled in the men’s short program, leaving him sixth ahead of Saturday’s free skate. Canada is holding at 13 medals — 4 gold, 5 silver and 4 bronze.———ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:— Statistics Canada will release monthly manufacturing data for December.— Defence Minister Sajjan is in Munich to attend the annual Munich Security Conference.— Trial in Winnipeg for Daniel Williams, charged with manslaughter in the death of his 12-month-old daughter in 2014.last_img read more