first_img17 January 2014 The Saldanha Bay Industrial Development Zone, launched late last year, is already drawing strong international interest, with several lease agreements signed and a surge of global oil and gas companies negotiating joint ventures with South African firms, the Western Cape provincial government said on Thursday. “The Saldanha Bay IDZ Licencing Company has signed six lease agreements with international and South African oil and gas companies,” Western Cape Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Minister Alan Winde said in a statement. “These include firms specialising in oilfield services, oil rig operations, logistics operators, ship repair, engineering and market support.” Final negotiations for lease agreements are taking place between the Licencing Company and two international oilfield service companies and a South African rig repair firm, Winde said. “In some of the most exciting developments, the Licencing Company is in talks with an international consortium to develop a rig module building facility. We are also aware of a R200-million investment by a global oil servicing company which is set to create 300 jobs. Several leading international companies are increasing their staff numbers in their South African companies.” Winde said details on individual companies were bound by non-disclosure agreements and could not be released at this stage.African oil, gas service and supply hub A feasibility study conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry found that Saldanha Bay is strategically located to serve as a service, maintenance, fabrication and supply hub for the booming African oil and gas sector, due to the increasing number of oil rigs requiring maintenance, and their traffic flow passing from the west to the east coast of Africa. In October last year, German company Oiltanking GmbH entered a joint venture with a number of South African companies to build a commercial crude oil storage and blending terminal at the port of Saldanha. The company said that Saldanha was an excellent location for a crude oil hub, “as it is close to strategic tanker routes from key oil-producing regions to major oil-consuming markets”. Ideally situated for the blending of west African and South American crude oils, Saldanha “has the potential to establish itself as a global crude transhipment hub focused on certain established trade routes,” the company added. The Western Cape government has invested R25-million over five years in setting up the industrial development zone (IDZ). “This is the culmination of years of collaboration between all spheres of government and the Saldanha Bay community,” Winde said. “The IDZ has the potential to become one of the most important levers for jobs and economic growth for the Western Cape. Early indications are that it will indeed be a major catalyst for foreign direct investment and increased employment opportunities for our residents in the medium to long term.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

first_imgLike the British referendum vote earlier this year, the election of Donald Trump in the United States has sent tectonic waves not just through the individual countries but also around the globe. With the unexpected results of both votes, we in the retail trade industry are left with more questions than answers as to what comes next on a variety of subjects.For the retail loss prevention and profit protection industry, it remains business as usual—for the time being. Employee theft will continue as will shoplifting and organized retail crime. Compliance to internal and external regulations will remain a focus as will safety of customers and employees.However, the anticipated changes, especially in global trade and immigration policies will undoubtedly have a major impact on the retail environment and, thus, on loss prevention policies, logistics security and processes, and retail hiring.- Sponsor – Over the past decade, perhaps longer in Europe, loss prevention has played an integral role supporting retailers’ acquisitionand sourcing of manufacturing materials and transportation of merchandise from point of manufacture to store shelves. Trade partnerships and international agreements have by most accounts helped streamline the flow of goods. Yet renegotiating or even bowing out of these trade agreements entirely, which certainly was a primary focus of Trump’s campaign, could have a tremendous impact on both the flow and cost of goods.The nationalist movements that stoked both campaigns—and are alive and seemingly empowered in other countries throughout Europe—are hoping to return jobs to their home countries, jobs that they believe were outsourced to lower-wage nations in Latin America and Asia. Whether or not jobs return or remain outside the country, prices of goods will almost inevitably increase on the merchandise retailers sell, especially if tariff wars erupt as some experts predict.Debate will continue as to the long-term benefit of changing trade policies, but there is no disagreement that retailers and their customers will be affected bothin the long and short term. Prices will likely fluctuate dramatically both up and down. On-shelf availability—one of the LP industry’s major objectives—will be even harder to manage. Consumers will likely find goods unavailable in their neighborhood stores as well as online more frequently than today. Theft of products in high demand yet low availability will beadded to the “hot products” on organized retail crime gangs’ target lists.I am certainly no economist or trade expert. Even if I were, based on the wide-ranging opinions voiced by those who are, there is no way to predict how the next few months and years will unfold. That said, the entire retail organization, including loss prevention, should begin an ongoing dialogue both inside each company and throughout the industryto look at policies and procedures and contingency plans to be able to proactively manage the changes as they occur.Just as we prepare for natural disasters and terrorist events in our crisis management and business continuity planning, we should take a similar approach to these political upheavals. In fact, based on the extreme outcry from both sides after these recent developments, some might argue that these are indeed crisis events no different than an earthquake or hurricane, yet with much more far-reaching impact.What is your take on the impact of these political changes? Are you discussing the impact inside your company in a formal way? We would love to hear from those on both sides of the Atlantic to help the retail industry begin dialogue on this important issue.This article was originally published in LP Magazine EU in the Winter 2016-2017 issue. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

first_img“Brothers, even though I’m not there fighting with you, you’re always part of my prayers. That’s all I can give right now and like what I told coach Chot when I excused myself, this is not the last time I’ll be playing for the nation. Once I’m 100-percent again, I’ll try out, and if I’m still deserving at that time, I’ll still give all my heart to play for the country,” he said.Romeo is one of the biggest omissions from the national team in this first leg, as the speedy playmaker from FEU averaged 17.8 points, 3.0 assists, and 1.7 rebounds in the 2017 Fiba Asia Cup.Without him, much of the playmaking and scoring load will fall on the shoulders of Jayson Castro, as well as substitutes Kiefer Ravena and Kevin Alas for the game against Japan.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Photo from Fiba.comAmid all the questions about his absence, Terrence Romeo insisted that it was his nagging knee injury and not anything else that prevented him from joining Gilas Pilipinas in the to the 2019 Fiba World Cup.Romeo, an integral piece of the national team, broke his silence and declared his support for his brothers hours before the Filipinos take on Japan in Tokyo.ADVERTISEMENT The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay The sly guard set the record straight in an Instagram post that his knee contusion was the main reason for his absence and that “no one else can stop me from playing for the country aside from my injury.” Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads Malditas save PH from shutout He also credited the Gilas program for his growth as a player.“My family and the people close to me knows that I’m indebted to Gilas because it’s here where I became disciplined, where I fast-tracked my maturity in basketball,” he said.Romeo was in and out of training camp for the first leg of the Asian qualifiers before eventually missing the last few days of training.Days before the team left for Japan, head coach Chot Reyes said he was still hopeful that Romeo could join the trip, but when it was clear that he was definitely out, he was not anymore included in the Final 12 for the game.Romeo, though, vowed to the national team mentor that he’ll be back better than ever.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ View commentscenter_img LATEST STORIES MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 Brazil striker Robinho given nine-year term in Italy for rapelast_img read more

first_imgAlberta Ballet are set to take All of Us, based on the music of the Tragically Hip, on tour for five weeks next year.The company will introduce the ballet to new audiences across Canada, with them performing in Toronto, Hamilton, Edmonton, Calgary, and Vancouver. They’ll kick things off on May 25 in Hamilton before ending the dates on June 17 in Calgary.The much-loved show tells the story of “two warring clans who battle to inherit the earth to redesign its future anew.” It features a dynamic soundtrack featuring 20 iconic songs from the Hip’s legendary 30-year anthology. Advertisement Band member Rob Baker was a huge fan when he saw the show. He said, according to a press release: “I saw it twice and found it exhilarating. We are thrilled that the Alberta Ballet is taking the show out nationally.”Alberta Ballet artistic director and choreographer Jean Grand-Maitre said, “Beyond the Canadiana we usually attach to the music of the Hip, there lies a whole other universal wisdom which speaks, through its extraordinary simplicity, about humanity’s true inner potential.”All of Us is the latest addition to Grand-Maitre’s series of portrait ballets, with previous performances including the work of k.d. lang (Balletlujah), Sarah McLachlan (Fumbling Towards Ecstasy), Joni Mitchell (Joni Mitchell’s The Fiddle and the Drum), Elton John (Love Lies Bleeding), and Gordon Lightfoot (Our Canada).Tickets for All of Us will go on sale Wednesday, Dec. 19, at 10 a.m. For more info click here.By BECCA LONGMIRE | ET CANADA Advertisement Photo by George Pimentel/WireImage/Getty Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

first_img(The family of Joey Knapaysweet released this photo and a statement Thursday about his recent death. Above he is seen with his mother Micheline Knapaysweet taken just before his death.)The Canadian PressTORONTO – The grieving mother of a young Indigenous man killed by police in northern Ontario spoke out Thursday, saying the family remains in shock and still doesn’t understand why her son died.In a statement from the remote community of Fort Albany, Ont., Micheline Knapaysweet said the family needs answers about the death of her son, Joey Knapaysweet.“What did he do that was so bad that he had to be shot and killed?” Micheline Knapaysweet said. “I am so heartbroken, with so many questions unanswered.”Police in Timmins, Ont., shot 21-year-old Joey Knapaysweet on Feb. 3, in an as-yet unexplained incident that raised racial tensions in the city and sparked anger from the Indigenous community.The province’s police watchdog, the Special Investigations Unit, is looking into the incident and has said officers responded mid-morning to a health-care building and a man fled.“There was an interaction between the man and officers, and one of the officers discharged a firearm,” the unit said in a statement. “The man was struck. He was taken to hospital where he was later pronounced dead.”His death prompted scores of people to attend a vigil – among them Timmins Mayor Steve Black – and denunciation from Indigenous leaders.Joey Knapaysweet was from the James Bay community of Fort Albany – more than an hour’s flight from Timmins. He had gone to Timmins to “seek help in dreams for betterment of his life,” according to his mother’s statement.His mother also released two photographs, including the last one of them together just before he left home.“I cannot sleep at nights, I need answers,” she said. “This is my son, my child.”The family asked for privacy, saying they were not yet ready to speak directly to the media.Black, who urged calm after what he said was a rare shooting, has acknowledged that relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in the city took a hit.Knapaysweet died the same weekend as Agnes Sutherland, an ailing 62-year-old also from Fort Albany, who had been in police custody after an incident at a shelter. The Special Investigations Unit is looking into her death as well.The deaths, along with the acquittal last week of white farmer Gerald Stanley in Saskatchewan in the 2016 killing of a young Cree man, Coulten Boushie, have cast a harsh spotlight in recent weeks on attitudes toward Indigenous people.The Stanley verdict sparked protests across the country along with condemnation from the federal justice minister, with critics calling the justice system biased against Indigenous people.last_img read more