first_imgShare This!©DisneyMany people dream of walking the red carpet and holding that beautiful golden statue, thanking their friends and family. Well, since I doubt you’ll have the opportunity to do that, here’s the next best thing for those of you who are fans of The Oscars.For a limited time, Guests who visit Disney’s Hollywood Studios’s One Man’s Dream will have the once-in-a-lifetime chance to see and take a photo with a gorgeous Oscar statuette.During this unique experience, Guests will have the opportunity to walk the red carpet and pose with the Oscar statue, against a signature Oscar backdrop. Oh and make sure to share your experience on social media using the hashtag, #Oscars.This wonderful opportunity will be available for Guests to take part in only until February 26.The Oscars will air this Sunday, February 26, on ABC at 7:00 p.m. ET/4:00 p.m. PT and will feature host Jimmy Kimmel.last_img read more

first_img18 January 2008South Africans Alex Harris and Sibusiso Vilane made history on Thursday when they became the first South African team to walk unassisted to the South Pole.The duo set out on their epic 65-day journey on 10 November, dragging 130-kilogram sleds almost 1200 kilometres across some of the most hostile terrain on the planet.Antarctica generates much of the bad weather in the southern hemisphere, and storms there can be fierce. Temperatures range from an ambient of about -8 degrees to about -40 degrees Celsius.They completed their journey without the help of support teams putting out food or rigging up tents, and without using wind power or sled dogs, in what Harris described as “the purest form of getting to the South Pole”.Harris and Vilane are no strangers to extreme feats, with Harris becoming the second South African to summit the highest peak on each of the seven continents, the so-called “seven summits”, in 2005 and Vilane becoming the first black South African to climb Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain, in 2003.The two men spent almost a year training for the trek, dragging tyres requiring a pulling force of 30-40kg every second day, covering a distance of about 17 kilometres per training session.The trip was premised on covering at least 20 kilometres a day – they carried only an extra five days’ worth of emergency fuel and food – meaning that any mileage lost in a day would have to be made up for, or they would risk running out of supplies.They just made it, taking exactly five more days than planned – one day more and they’d have been running on empty.The physical and mental toughness it took to achieve this is hinted at in some of the extracts from Harris’s trip journal …No painkillers– extracts from Alex Harris’s journal21 November 2007have only covered distance of 45kms so far, but the last 6 days we have been stuck in our tent with high winds, so it is very frustrating23 November 2007finally on the move again. whiteout today so tough going. broke a ski in the wind the other day. did a repair job, just hope it lasts27 November 2007hi. only managed 14km in 8hrs. weather was perfect but it was the toughest day yet. soft snow made pulling desperate. but we finally made it to 81 degrees!01 December 2007at last. day 18 and did 20.48km in 8.5hrs. felt good, weather perfect and snow improving all the time. 42 more days!02 December 2007another good day. day 19. did 19.4km. my heel is starting to act up. there is a monster bank of clouds rolling in from the east.04 December 2007day 21. i battled today. heel burning like a hot poker. trying different things. sibu is fine11 December 2007day 28. last two days have been desperate conditions. zero vizibility and thick snow. only managed 15km today. heaviest the sleds have felt!13 December 2007this place deprives us of the luxury of nightime but the gloom of the day robs us of the light. instead we move through a grey twilight that knows not dawn nor dusk. it is fit for neither the living nor the dead. battled for 10hrs in the same conditions just for 15km04 January 2008day 52. feel exhausted. did 22.3km but getting colder measured -25.9 in my pocket! done 800km12 January 2008day 60 comes at last. perfect weather. still -22. did 25.4km in 10 hrs. tomorrow its on to emergency rations some juicy tidbits not mentioned before for fear of freaking the folks out. in that very windy spell in the first week, i got frostbite on my inside left thigh, about the size of my hand. not serious though as there is nothing to freeze solid and fall off. unless it was higher up my leg! anyway i have had to doctor it every day and make sure it doesnt go septic. but it is finally healing and forming scabs.14 January 2008day 62. mon 14th. gloomy day but still did 25.4km. countdown! 3 more days. 67km. unbelieveable! JTB #3. In the first week sibu and i had a huge argument about whether it was acceptable to do a #2 in the bell of the tent if conditions outside warranted it! thankfully it never came to that!15 January 2008day 63. JTB #4 We have had no painkillers on this trip. zip! must have fallen out when i was consolidating 2 kits into 1 at home16 January 2008day 64. wow, we have only 15km to go. listen to 702 thurs 4to6. you might catch us. i cant believe this day has finally come!SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_img5 May 2011 President Jacob Zuma gave the promotion of South Africa’s burgeoning tourism industry a boost by signing “The Golden Book”, a campaign by global tourism pacesetters, on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town on Wednesday. Zuma became the first African head of state to make an entry in the book, which is a joint initiative by the UN World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) and the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC) to position travel and tourism higher in the global agenda. The campaign seeks to mobilise recognition and support for travel and tourism from world leaders by demonstrating its crucial role in economic growth, job creation and development. “We take tourism very seriously in this country, given its job creation potential,” Zuma said. “That is why we have identified tourism as one of the six job drivers in our New Growth Path framework. “Tourism’s contribution to the GDP of our economy has increased from just less than five percent in 1994 to an estimated 7.7 percent in 2010.” Zuma said the country’s tourism sector was well placed to address unemployment “given its labour-intensive nature.” The President said tourism jobs were not only created in the travel and tourism industry, but also in the manufacturing, financial services, agriculture, healthcare and others areas of the economy. South Africa aims to increase the number of foreign arrivals from 7-million in 2009 to 15-million by 2020. “We plan to increase tourism’s total contribution to the economy from R189-billion in 2009 to R499-billion by 2020,” Zuma said. “Most importantly, we want to create 325 000 new tourism jobs by 2020. We will do everything possible to promote and grow the tourism sector so that we can achieve these developmental goals.” Among those who attended the signing ceremony were WTTC President David Scowsill, UNWTO ethics committee president Dawid de Villiers, and Tourism Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk. The signing took place on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum on Africa conference being held at the Cape Town International Convention Centre. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_imgWomen in the private sector have away to go to catch up with the progresstheir peers in the public sector have made. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Jeanette Hern  Partner, Grant Thornton Johannesburg  +27 11 322 4562 • Lesley Ann Foster  Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre  +27 43 743 9169 or +27 83 325 2497 RELATED ARTICLES • Empowerment for SA’s women• Women’s rights in SA to advance • Towards gender equality in SA • NGO fights for gender equality in SAShamin ChibbaSouth African women are making strides in the country’s private sector in terms of taking up senior positions, according to a recent international survey.The 2012 Grant Thornton International Business Report, which surveys trends in privately held businesses in 40 economies around the world, stated that 28% of senior management positions in South Africa were held by women.This is higher than the global average of 21%.Grant Thornton’s corporate finance head in Johannesburg, Jeanette Hern, said that this strong representation is indicative of the country’s progress towards gender equality.The percentage actually indicates an improvement from 27% last year. However, it falls just short of 2007’s figure of 29%.Creative ways to accommodate womenHern said, however, that more needs to be done for that figure to increase.“We need more innovative solutions in order to make a significant dent in the number of women still excluded from senior management,” she said.This includes finding more creative ways to accommodate women in the workplace. Hern said that just 39% of women surveyed in South Africa said that their businesses offer working conditions that accommodated flexible hours and alternative working locations.Also, the research found that women were not represented across a spectrum of management roles. Most were either human resource or finance directors.Just 8% of CEOs and 9% of COOs were women but according to Hern, this is an improvement from 2011, when only 3% of women held positions at these levels.Women have progressed, but can progress moreAccording to Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre’s executive director, Lesley Ann Foster, the exact number of women in leadership roles should be taken into consideration when analysing such statistics.Foster says that taken in context, the figures leave much room for improvement – but acknowledged that women have progressed in the past decade and they have occupied many senior positions, although not yet to a satisfactory degree.“Women make up 53% of the population so they should at least take up 50% of leadership positions but this is not happening,” she said.Foster was clear about the benefits that equality between men and women will have on society. She said that in a society where women are on an equal basis with men progress is quicker, the standard of living is higher and quality of life improves.“Women bring a lot of expertise and value to life,” she said. “If a woman works, the whole family and the community benefit. To be on par with men, women should receive decent work, decent pay.”Private sector must catch upFoster referred to studies done by the Businesswomen’s Association of South Africa (BWASA) in 2010, which stated that there are millions of women who are either unemployed or earn very little.The BWASA research indicates that 64% of women earned less than R1 000 per month, 80% earned less than R2 500 and more alarmingly, only 45% of women were employed. In addition, 53% of black women are currently unemployed.She also said that there are not enough women from previously disadvantaged backgrounds in leadership positions.BWASA East London’s chairperson, Lizelle Maurice, agreed with Foster’s sentiments, saying that while women have progressed tremendously in the public domain, with 47% being represented in government, they are still lagging within the private sector.When speaking of ways to ensure women are given a greater chance to participate within business, Maurice said: “Black economic empowerment status should also have a gender component.”last_img read more

first_imgThe equipment to set-up the cinema is portable and can be taken anywhere. (Image: The Sunshine Cinema)Using solar energy for power, the Sunshine Cinema screens short films of uplifting and useful content, targeting youth and rural communities, to promote self-empowerment by sharing practical ways to improve life.Sunshine Cinema produces a range of “how to” videos and facilitates workshops, as well as makes narrative-based short films that address social issues.Sydelle Willow Smith, the co-founder of Sunshine Cinema, told Redbull Amaphiko, “a collaborative platform for social entrepreneurs who want to change their corner of the world”: “We’re a collaboration between the skills development collective, The Shift, and the documentary filmmakers, Makhulu.”The group chose to use solar power, she said, because as filmmakers and design innovators they had worked in a variety of environments where electricity was not prevalent, and because renewable is sustainable. “We use solar power because we’re passionate about sustainable forms of energy.”RURAL AND DISENFRANCHISED BENEFITThe filmmakers decided to take their productions to the rural and disenfranchised people who were marginalised and did not get the opportunity to view their work.“As filmmakers from privileged backgrounds,” Smith said, “we felt we were often making films in areas where the people we were filming wouldn’t get a chance to see the work. This was problematic so we wanted to find ways to bring films to communities across the digital divide.“We screen community-tailored documentary content in the hope of promoting skills development, dialogues and enabling communities to become their own ‘engines of development.’”The screenings differ but in general they start with warm-up games to connect with the audience, before the viewers are shown the solar-powered cinema kit. “We then screen a selection of short films, including documentaries and our DIY tutorial clips for the day.”RECEPTION OF FILMSAnd the movies are well-received. “[The reception is] fantastic, everyone loves a cinema,” said Smith. “In the last two years we’ve visited diverse communities, youth, farmworkers and rural women’s groups, and all have responded well. We ran a record-breaking crowd-funding campaign on Thundafund and we’ve been featured on local and international media platforms.”Smith singles out the screening workshop in the township of Langa, in Cape Town. “One of the most impactful screening workshops we’ve hosted was in Langa, where we showed a video on how to make seats out of discarded tyres. It was a fantastic experience.“After our tyre seat workshop we screened a local animation film called Khumba. This meant the kids could roll their seats into the makeshift cinema we had created and watch their favourite cartoon.”CHALLENGES AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURESunshine Cinema started as a worthy idea but snowballed into a demanding start-up enterprise, according to Smith.“This rapid growth for Sunshine Cinema has been driven by a small team, which we would love to grow so that we can scale our impact too. Accessing early stage funding is never easy, and most of Sunshine Cinema’s development to date has been funded by the founding partners.”The Sunshine Cinema team will be going on a roadshow in August. “We’re partnering with other organisations to test the reception of the cinema beyond South Africa’s borders. We’ll be travelling from Cape Town to Kenya conducting research about our approach. We’re also working on making our content easily accessible to a wider audience.”last_img read more

first_imgLike the British referendum vote earlier this year, the election of Donald Trump in the United States has sent tectonic waves not just through the individual countries but also around the globe. With the unexpected results of both votes, we in the retail trade industry are left with more questions than answers as to what comes next on a variety of subjects.For the retail loss prevention and profit protection industry, it remains business as usual—for the time being. Employee theft will continue as will shoplifting and organized retail crime. Compliance to internal and external regulations will remain a focus as will safety of customers and employees.However, the anticipated changes, especially in global trade and immigration policies will undoubtedly have a major impact on the retail environment and, thus, on loss prevention policies, logistics security and processes, and retail hiring.- Sponsor – Over the past decade, perhaps longer in Europe, loss prevention has played an integral role supporting retailers’ acquisitionand sourcing of manufacturing materials and transportation of merchandise from point of manufacture to store shelves. Trade partnerships and international agreements have by most accounts helped streamline the flow of goods. Yet renegotiating or even bowing out of these trade agreements entirely, which certainly was a primary focus of Trump’s campaign, could have a tremendous impact on both the flow and cost of goods.The nationalist movements that stoked both campaigns—and are alive and seemingly empowered in other countries throughout Europe—are hoping to return jobs to their home countries, jobs that they believe were outsourced to lower-wage nations in Latin America and Asia. Whether or not jobs return or remain outside the country, prices of goods will almost inevitably increase on the merchandise retailers sell, especially if tariff wars erupt as some experts predict.Debate will continue as to the long-term benefit of changing trade policies, but there is no disagreement that retailers and their customers will be affected bothin the long and short term. Prices will likely fluctuate dramatically both up and down. On-shelf availability—one of the LP industry’s major objectives—will be even harder to manage. Consumers will likely find goods unavailable in their neighborhood stores as well as online more frequently than today. Theft of products in high demand yet low availability will beadded to the “hot products” on organized retail crime gangs’ target lists.I am certainly no economist or trade expert. Even if I were, based on the wide-ranging opinions voiced by those who are, there is no way to predict how the next few months and years will unfold. That said, the entire retail organization, including loss prevention, should begin an ongoing dialogue both inside each company and throughout the industryto look at policies and procedures and contingency plans to be able to proactively manage the changes as they occur.Just as we prepare for natural disasters and terrorist events in our crisis management and business continuity planning, we should take a similar approach to these political upheavals. In fact, based on the extreme outcry from both sides after these recent developments, some might argue that these are indeed crisis events no different than an earthquake or hurricane, yet with much more far-reaching impact.What is your take on the impact of these political changes? Are you discussing the impact inside your company in a formal way? We would love to hear from those on both sides of the Atlantic to help the retail industry begin dialogue on this important issue.This article was originally published in LP Magazine EU in the Winter 2016-2017 issue. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

first_imgFor the second year in a row, visitors to Chicago’s Printers Row Lit Fest had the chance to learn about free markets, individual liberty, and limited government. Among the many Baby-Boomer communist booksellers that line the street during the annual weekend festival, AFF’s Chicago leadership team stood proudly, distributing copies of F.A. Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, Leonard Reed’s “I, Pencil,” and Frederic Bastiat’s masterpiece, The Law.In addition to chatting with passersby about current events and the philosophy of freedom, AFF also offered visitors a chance to discover where they landed on the World’s Smallest Political Quiz. After taking ten questions, visitors could be placed in one of five distinct quadrants: libertarian, conservative, liberal, centrist, and statist. Although most landed in the left-liberal quadrant, many were surprised to land in the libertarian area given that they either were unfamiliar with the word or had a misunderstanding of it.AFF-Chicago committee member John Yackley provided an overview of the results at the end of the second day of the festival. AFF color-coded stickers by quiz-takers’ guesstimated ages: red is Millennials (and younger), green is Gen Xers, yellow is Baby Boomers, and blue represents members of the “Greatest Generation” (senior citizens).Watch a video of the results here.You’ll notice most Boomers end up in the left-liberal quadrant, while younger folk tend to be left-liberal to libertarian.AFF gathered nearly 100 email addresses at the festival and gave away dozens of copies of Hayek and Bastiat’s work to interested young people. Many books came courtesy of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, so our thanks go to them for their support.AFF expects to appear again next year at the festival to open more minds to the ideas of freedom.For more information on AFF’s Chicago chapter, join our Facebook page.last_img read more

first_img Kathryn Shelton is Director of Chapter Advancement for America’s Future Foundation. AFF San Francisco officially launched with a Happy Hour on Thursday, April 23, 2015. 40 liberty-minded locals gathered at the Slate SF lounge to toast liberty and celebrate AFF’s expansion to the West Coast. Located in the heart of San Francisco’s Mission District – an historic and iconic cultural neighborhood – Slate SF provided an ideal setting to discuss and celebrate America’s history, exceptionalism and future.The evening began with a welcome from Paul Doherty, AFF-San Francisco’s Chapter Leader, followed by remarks from Sally Pipes, President and CEO of the Pacific Research Institute.Sally discussed PRI’s mission and recent work, and then spoke about Obamacare and its alternatives. She concluded that young people need to have an active voice for liberty in order to make real social change.last_img read more

first_img By Jeffrey MervisMay. 8, 2018 , 9:00 AM Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidatesPHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA—Before Chrissy Houlahan decided to run for Congress in southeastern Pennsylvania, she made a list of things she felt anyone serving in that body needed to understand. At the top were how to protect the country, how to grow the economy, and how to educate the nation’s children.Houlahan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and a master’s degree in technology policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, realized she was well-suited to tackle all three questions with her experience as a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, an executive with two successful startup companies, and a chemistry teacher in an urban high school. But before throwing her hat into the ring, Houlahan applied one more lesson from her time in the classroom, on the job, and in the military: She gamed out a way to win the election.Some 15 months later, Houlahan has implemented that plan to perfection. Thanks in part to a near-flawless campaign and prodigious fundraising, she is now the only Democrat on the 15 May primary ballot for Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district (PA-6), an area southwest of here. Because of some good fortune, she’s also a heavy favorite to win the general election in November for what is now an open seat.The 50-year-old Houlahan says she isn’t afraid of competition. “But it’s very draining if there are lots of us [Democrats] fighting among ourselves” in the primary election, she notes. And although she says her ultimate goal is to turn the district “from a red dot to a blue dot,” it’s no secret that she wants to be that blue dot.“Our system is in desperate straits, and you can either run away and hide or try to be part of the solution,” she says. When asked why she chose Congress for her first foray into politics, rather than a local post, she doesn’t mince words. “I don’t have time for that. The stakes are too high, and I think I’m qualified.” How a Pennsylvania industrial engineer became the odds-on favorite to win a seat in Congress Public health scientist hopes to take his activism to Congress Pennsylvania is a key battleground in the fight for control of the next Congress, and scientists are in the middle of that fight. In February, the state’s highest court threw out a Republican-drawn map of the state’s 18 congressional districts and installed one that, for the most part, eliminates partisan gerrymandering. Those new districts helped push some Republican incumbents into retirement, while at the same time prompting many first-time Democratic candidates to run for seats that now appear winnable.The result is a political free-for-all in which veteran campaign watchers are hedging their bets on who the winners might be. “I haven’t seen a single poll, and without a poll, you can’t begin to make a guess,” says political scientist Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall College (F&M) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center for Politics and Public Affairs and runs the F&M Poll. A crowded field, he says, simply adds to the confusion. This story is the second in a three-part series on candidates with considerable scientific training who are running as Democrats for the U.S. House of Representatives in Pennsylvania. Their first test is the 15 May primary.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Chrissy Houlahan makes her pitch to voters in Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district. Kelly Schulz center_img The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates Postdoc hopes Pennsylvania voters will help her re-engineer how to run for Congress The science vote No more flying soloAsk Houlahan about her childhood, and her answer—“I grew up everywhere”—reflects her military upbringing. Houlahan’s father and one of her grandfathers were U.S. Navy pilots, and her dad’s job flying P-3 Orion antisubmarine reconnaissance planes meant the family would always be along the water. By the time she was a teenager, Houlahan was a certified scuba diver, an open-water swimmer, and a budding marine biologist. Her easy access to both oceans and sky, combined with a strong parental push to study science, led her to put astronaut at the top of her career choices.In her mind, the process began by becoming a pilot. She won an Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship to attend Stanford. However, the military was not welcome on campus when she arrived there in 1985. So every Friday, Houlahan was one of 20 Stanford undergraduates who would pile into cars and drive 40 kilometers to San Jose State University for daylong training.Hostility to the military wasn’t the only obstacle she had to overcome. Engineering classes were typically offered Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—and Houlahan said Stanford made no attempt to accommodate the ROTC students who would be absent. “So ROTC meant you were basically missing one-third of your classes, for 4 years,” she recalls. “And that made it pretty hard to be a very good student.”The size of the ROTC class would eventually dwindle to four, with Houlahan as the only woman. And although her military heritage helped her persevere—“I knew exactly what I was setting myself up for,” she says—she made an unorthodox decision when the Air Force offered her one of its highly competitive slots for pilot training.“I turned them down,” she says. “I had already started dating my husband and was hoping that we would end up making a life together. I had grown up in a wandering lifestyle in which we moved every year. He wasn’t going into the military, and I visualized what his life would be like if I were in the military.”Her classmates and Air Force officials couldn’t believe it, she recalls. “I remember the Air Force was pretty disappointed, and my ROTC cadre was stunned. But it was a lifestyle choice. And we’ve been married for 28 years, so I think I made the right one.”After graduation, Houlahan spent 3 years at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts, which focuses on electronic communications systems. There she worked on air and space defense technologies “one or more generations in the future.” The challenges included figuring out “what types of information people need, and in what order, and with what visual displays, when ballistic missiles are raining down on you” and “how to communicate in a postnuclear war environment.”Corner office to the classroomAfter leaving the military, she made use of her MIT degree, which combined business and engineering courses, to help her husband run a fledgling sports apparel company, AND1. The startup, based here, soon grew to rival industry leader Nike. Its socially responsible benefits included 40 hours of paid community service annually for every employee, which Houlahan invariably used to improve educational opportunities for underserved populations. “And for me,” she says, “that meant women and girls in STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] and communities of color.”Eventually, she decided that she needed to experience the problems facing the nation’s public schools before she could hope to have any impact. So she left an executive position at another startup her husband had co-founded and enrolled in a program for lifelong learners at the University of Pennsylvania, retaking chemistry and taking biology for the first time. She also was accepted into Teach for America, an on-the-job training program that placed her at Simon Gratz High School, a storied but troubled school here.For someone used to working in a corner office, Simon Gratz was an eye-opening experience. “We had some labs, but we didn’t have access to them for most of the year,” she says. A bigger problem, she soon realized, was that “teaching science to kids who are reading really, really below grade level is an impossibility. And my kids were reading at the third or fourth grade level.”Although Teach for America fellows, who are often fresh out of college, must stay in the classroom for 2 years to earn their teaching degree, Houlahan left the program after 1 year. She had learned enough, she says, to understand the importance of literacy in tackling many of the problems facing urban schools. She then joined Springboard Collaborative, a nonprofit based here that aims to improve literacy by creating a year-round learning environment for students that extends into the home and community.A wall of moneyHoulahan says that she and her husband have emphasized to their three children, now adults, the importance of putting their talents to the “highest, best use.” After Donald Trump was elected president, she says, she applied that imperative to herself.“I was raised to respect the democratic process, and the will of the people, and whoever is your commander in chief,” she says. “And this was the first time that I felt I couldn’t do that.”Anticipating that her response to that dilemma might lead her into electoral politics, Houlahan spent the next 3 months exploring what it would take to run a campaign. One day, she appended a note to a fundraising solicitation from Emily’s List, a nonprofit that supports women running for office and to which she regularly donated small amounts. “I want to run for Congress,” she wrote. “What does it take?”Once she made up her mind, Houlahan hit the ground running. She wanted to learn as much as possible about the district. She also wanted to raise enough money to scare off any challengers.“I wanted to put up as big a defense as I could,” she says, “because it doesn’t do anybody any good to fight among ourselves.” Her strategy has been wildly successful: As of 31 March, Houlahan had raised $2 million, a staggering haul for a political novice in the run-up to a primary.Raising vast amounts is “a necessary evil” for first-time candidates like herself who need to introduce themselves to potential voters, she says. “But it’s also a big part of what’s broken in campaigning.” If voters send her to Washington, D.C., she promises to seek ways “to lessen the role of money and increase transparency in campaigning.”Houlahan has also benefited from forces beyond her control. The two-term incumbent Republican who holds the seat, Representative Ryan Costello, dropped out of the race a week after the 20 March filing deadline. That leaves Greg McCauley, a tax lawyer and neophyte candidate, as the only eligible Republican.In another stroke of good luck for Houlahan, the district in which she is running has become decidedly more Democratic since she declared her candidacy. In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out a map apportioning all 18 congressional seats that was created by the state’s Republican-led legislature. The old PA-6 was nearly evenly split between those who voted for Trump and those who supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential race. But Democrats enjoy a 10-point advantage in the newly redrawn district. As a result, political handicappers have shifted the seat from a toss-up to likely Democrat.If Houlahan wins, she will be looking for opportunities to promote her ideas on national security, the economy, and education. She says she’s “pro-business” but progressive on social issues. She’d also like to explore ways to shorten the campaign season—and lessen the incessant need to raise money.“I have been campaigning for 18 months for a job that, if I win, I will hold for 2 years,” she says wearily. “And as near as I can tell, I’ll start fundraising to get re-elected the day after I’m sworn in.”Even so, Houlahan is looking forward to meeting some kindred spirits in Washington, D.C. “I’m hopeful that, if I get elected, there will be a lot of people like me who want to be part of a wave of change. And if there are enough of us, maybe we’ll have the opportunity to make a difference.”*Correction, 9 May, 10:53 p.m.: This story has been updated to correct Houlahan’s age.last_img read more

first_img‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Palace: Robredo back to ‘groping with a blind vision’ No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups Early theme to NBA season: You score, I score, we all score Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netDe La Salle is headed to the Final Four after brushing off University of the East, 99-78, in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.The defending champions Green Archers streaked to their fourth straight win to improve to 9- while the Red Warriors slipped to 3-8, but remained mathematically in contention for a semifinals spot.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. View comments “Actually our team is a strong unit as long as we follow our system, and we should move as one.”Reigning MVP Ben Mbala led all scorers with 25 points to go along 14 rebounds to lead La Salle while Santi Santillan added a 14-point, 11-rebound double-double.Rivero and Justine Baltazar came off the bench and had 26 points apiece to help La Salle’s cause.Alvin Pasaol, who put up a career-high 49 points in the first round against La Salle, managed 23 points and nine boards to lead UE while Mark Olayon had 18 points and seven assists.ADVERTISEMENT La Salle started to command respect as early as midway through the second quarter when it mounted a 22-6 run with Justine Baltazar capping it off with an off-balanced jumper that gave the Green Archers a 40-24 lead.That then ballooned to 27 points with 2:25 left in the third when Baltazar hit a triple that punctuated the Green Archers’ 11-3 run that put La Salle up 74-47.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingAnd even though La Salle’s remaining games became mere formalities, Ricci Rivero said they shouldn’t think ahead and that they should remain focused on the eliminations.“We shouldn’t think ahead, and we should focus on just one game at a time,” said Rivero in Filipino who filled in for the post-game press conference as La Salle head coach Aldin Ayo snubbed it for the sixth time.last_img read more