first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — Confidence can breed success, and after the first half of its WIAA playoff opener on March 6 at Chippewa Falls, the Marshfield boys basketball team had plenty of it.The Tigers got hot from the 3-point line early and went on to knock off Chippewa Falls 57-34, scoring their most points in a game in over a month.Marshfield took that momentum into last Saturday’s Division 1 regional final at Hudson, putting up a season-high 67 points in a 67-61 victory to win its second-straight regional championship. The Tigers (8-16) came back from an eight-point deficit in the second half to pull out the win.Marshfield (8-16) will play Superior (20-4) in a WIAA Division 1 sectional semifinal at 7 p.m. Thursday at Eau Claire North High School. The winner will take on either Stevens Point (23-1) or Neenah (20-4) in a sectional final Saturday night at Wausau West High School.“We shot it well, and I thought we defended the heck out of Chippewa Falls,” Marshfield coach Bill Zuiker said. “We went in knowing it would be tough. They had beat us earlier in the year, but they had lost their last game and weren’t really flying high going into the playoffs.“These kids all season, they haven’t quit and haven’t given up on themselves or on me, and they got a payoff out of it. I was so thrilled they could realize some rewards. They worked hard and prepared hard.”Marshfield struggled offensively for much of the season, scoring 50 points or more only twice in its last nine games.The Tigers were able to turn it around in the two playoff wins and embrace an underdog mentality, something that was the complete opposite of last season when Marshfield was a No. 1 seed and expected to make a run to the sectionals.“Coach gets us prepared every night for who we are going to play, and we’re just playing basketball,” senior guard Caleb Alexander said.Marshfield got big games from different players each night.In the semifinal win over Chippewa Falls, Tanner Boson was 5-for-6 and Alexander was 3-for-4 from 3-point range, scoring 22 and 15 points, respectively.Against Hudson, junior forward Adam Fravert hit for 20 points, and senior reserve guard Jordan Schlinsog scored 15. The Tigers combined to make 17 of 33 3-pointers and shot 57 percent overall.“We changed our offense a little bit, making four guys out to get a little more driving action and kick it out and shoot,” Boson said. “That really helped us. We’ve been doing a lot of shooting drills lately to get our shots up, and we just shot it a lot better.”Marshfield’s roster boasts seven seniors, six of whom have played significant minutes lately. After entering the playoffs on a four-game losing streak—all of which came by three points or less—it was the seniors that banded together to stay positive.“One of my main goals was keeping the guys focused, keeping them strong with the ball and telling these guys to compete, which is what we wanted to do, compete every night,” Alexander said.“Anything can happen in the playoffs,” Boson added. “Nothing is guaranteed. Our coach got us to believe. We’ve been having some good weeks of practice, and those close games, they were motivators for us.”(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)last_img read more

first_img18 January 2008South Africans Alex Harris and Sibusiso Vilane made history on Thursday when they became the first South African team to walk unassisted to the South Pole.The duo set out on their epic 65-day journey on 10 November, dragging 130-kilogram sleds almost 1200 kilometres across some of the most hostile terrain on the planet.Antarctica generates much of the bad weather in the southern hemisphere, and storms there can be fierce. Temperatures range from an ambient of about -8 degrees to about -40 degrees Celsius.They completed their journey without the help of support teams putting out food or rigging up tents, and without using wind power or sled dogs, in what Harris described as “the purest form of getting to the South Pole”.Harris and Vilane are no strangers to extreme feats, with Harris becoming the second South African to summit the highest peak on each of the seven continents, the so-called “seven summits”, in 2005 and Vilane becoming the first black South African to climb Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain, in 2003.The two men spent almost a year training for the trek, dragging tyres requiring a pulling force of 30-40kg every second day, covering a distance of about 17 kilometres per training session.The trip was premised on covering at least 20 kilometres a day – they carried only an extra five days’ worth of emergency fuel and food – meaning that any mileage lost in a day would have to be made up for, or they would risk running out of supplies.They just made it, taking exactly five more days than planned – one day more and they’d have been running on empty.The physical and mental toughness it took to achieve this is hinted at in some of the extracts from Harris’s trip journal …No painkillers– extracts from Alex Harris’s journal21 November 2007have only covered distance of 45kms so far, but the last 6 days we have been stuck in our tent with high winds, so it is very frustrating23 November 2007finally on the move again. whiteout today so tough going. broke a ski in the wind the other day. did a repair job, just hope it lasts27 November 2007hi. only managed 14km in 8hrs. weather was perfect but it was the toughest day yet. soft snow made pulling desperate. but we finally made it to 81 degrees!01 December 2007at last. day 18 and did 20.48km in 8.5hrs. felt good, weather perfect and snow improving all the time. 42 more days!02 December 2007another good day. day 19. did 19.4km. my heel is starting to act up. there is a monster bank of clouds rolling in from the east.04 December 2007day 21. i battled today. heel burning like a hot poker. trying different things. sibu is fine11 December 2007day 28. last two days have been desperate conditions. zero vizibility and thick snow. only managed 15km today. heaviest the sleds have felt!13 December 2007this place deprives us of the luxury of nightime but the gloom of the day robs us of the light. instead we move through a grey twilight that knows not dawn nor dusk. it is fit for neither the living nor the dead. battled for 10hrs in the same conditions just for 15km04 January 2008day 52. feel exhausted. did 22.3km but getting colder measured -25.9 in my pocket! done 800km12 January 2008day 60 comes at last. perfect weather. still -22. did 25.4km in 10 hrs. tomorrow its on to emergency rations some juicy tidbits not mentioned before for fear of freaking the folks out. in that very windy spell in the first week, i got frostbite on my inside left thigh, about the size of my hand. not serious though as there is nothing to freeze solid and fall off. unless it was higher up my leg! anyway i have had to doctor it every day and make sure it doesnt go septic. but it is finally healing and forming scabs.14 January 2008day 62. mon 14th. gloomy day but still did 25.4km. countdown! 3 more days. 67km. unbelieveable! JTB #3. In the first week sibu and i had a huge argument about whether it was acceptable to do a #2 in the bell of the tent if conditions outside warranted it! thankfully it never came to that!15 January 2008day 63. JTB #4 We have had no painkillers on this trip. zip! must have fallen out when i was consolidating 2 kits into 1 at home16 January 2008day 64. wow, we have only 15km to go. listen to 702 thurs 4to6. you might catch us. i cant believe this day has finally come!SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgToday, Box announced a tablet-optimized Android app, a PlayBook app (the company’s first native app for any BlackBerry platform) and a new HTML5 mobile site. The Android version replaces the company’s existing Android app and will work with both smartphones and tablets, optimizing the view depending on the device.More interesting than the actual app announcements, Box CEO Aaron Levie revealed that the company has seen a 600% increase in enterprise sales regarding mobile. And yes, that’s specifically enterprise sales, not overall sales. For example, Proctor and Gamble just became a Box customer based largely on the company’s mobile support.Screenshot of the Box app on an Android tablet.We’ve seen an explosion of enterprise mobile applications, especially tablet apps (as we’ve documented here on an at least weekly basis). But it hasn’t been clear to what degree enterprises are actually demanding and taking advantage of these apps. Box’s experience indicates that enterprises are indeed looking for these solutions.In the past, I’ve wondered how Box would stand out in the market. Among large enterprises, SharePoint already has a huge marketshare, and companies like Newsgator and Harmon.ie are making it more palatable to end users. Now that you can upload any file format to Google Docs, Google Apps is shoring up a lot of the mid-market, and Dropbox and Google Docs have become the de facto standards for document sharing and collaboration between individual professionals. So where would Box, and its competitors like Huddle, fit into this (especially with Apple iCloud now on the scene)?Box seems to have solved by building niche with its mobile support (the company received a leading position in the Forrester Wave on mobile collaboration) and possibly also through its integrations with Google Docs, SharePoint and various ECM systems. Box is now positioning itself as a way to glue together Google Docs and ECM systems and as a way to take documents mobile while maintaining enterprise security (thanks in part to its partnership with VMware).Disclosure: VMware is a ReadWriteWeb sponsor Related Posts Tags:#enterprise#mobile 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img klint finley Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

first_imgChances are, you already use the cloud in some area of your life. Whether it’s storing photos from your phone or listening to streaming music, cloud has quickly become essential to modern life. Yet many small businesses are still using antiquated processes to store and share their files. As digital data grows, those systems are no longer adequate.Benefits of cloud migration can be significant, including lower office expenses and increased efficiency, but there’s a lot of confusion around getting started. Check out the info below to build a strong foundation for your small business cloud.What Is Cloud Storage?The cloud is a network of servers that handles data remotely. A cloud network can store data — like all those images we upload to Facebook — or serve up applications for streaming services like Spotify.The most immediate benefit of using the cloud is easy access. Salesforce sums it up nicely: “Where in the past, people would run applications or programs from software downloaded on a physical computer or server in their building, cloud computing allows people to access the same kinds of applications through the internet.”How Can the Cloud Help Small Business?Storing data in the cloud gives small business employees the ability to work from anywhere. You might be giving a PowerPoint presentation to a potential client downtown while an analyst compiles a weekly report from home and someone in the office enters data. Whatever the scenario, you’re all accessing the same data in real time. The cloud boosts efficiency by keeping all your files in the same place and accessible from anywhere.Not only is that data readily available, but working in the cloud also reduces the need for expensive IT hardware and on-site software. Employees just need a computer to access a variety of services such as video conferencing, mobile and internet convergence, data sharing, integrated messaging, and software that was previously only available with the purchase of a license. Cloud-based software is also constantly updated, so you’re always using the latest version.Another significant benefit of moving small business services to the cloud is the ability to scale. When you need more processing power or data storage, it’s easy to expand without changing hardware — and without the unproductive downtime that usually comes with an IT upgrade.Cloud Options and Where to StartCloud computing has reached a level of maturity that makes it accessible to small business, but the host of options can be overwhelming. Start by researching some of the best cloud services for small businesses. Most fall into categories, so you can choose based on your needs:Communications and commerce-based toolsSecurity and network monitoringFinancial toolsIt’s important to vet cloud service providers before adopting one, just as you would any other service provider. Consider a few key elements when looking for an online storage provider, including proven infrastructure and an active, established user base.When assessing a provider, take a look at the company’s security measures as well. Many small business owners report being concerned about the security of remotely accessed cloud-based systems. However, broad scrutiny, higher standards, and ongoing audits result in a more secure cloud overall. Small businesses can do their part to maintain data security by ensuring tight permissions, and by identifying risks in the office.You can find more tips on cloud adoption — as well as resources specific to small business — by visiting our Small Business Hub. And to join the conversation, be sure to follow @IntelSmallBiz on Twitter.last_img read more

first_img By Jeffrey MervisMay. 8, 2018 , 9:00 AM Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidatesPHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA—Before Chrissy Houlahan decided to run for Congress in southeastern Pennsylvania, she made a list of things she felt anyone serving in that body needed to understand. At the top were how to protect the country, how to grow the economy, and how to educate the nation’s children.Houlahan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and a master’s degree in technology policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, realized she was well-suited to tackle all three questions with her experience as a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, an executive with two successful startup companies, and a chemistry teacher in an urban high school. But before throwing her hat into the ring, Houlahan applied one more lesson from her time in the classroom, on the job, and in the military: She gamed out a way to win the election.Some 15 months later, Houlahan has implemented that plan to perfection. Thanks in part to a near-flawless campaign and prodigious fundraising, she is now the only Democrat on the 15 May primary ballot for Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district (PA-6), an area southwest of here. Because of some good fortune, she’s also a heavy favorite to win the general election in November for what is now an open seat.The 50-year-old Houlahan says she isn’t afraid of competition. “But it’s very draining if there are lots of us [Democrats] fighting among ourselves” in the primary election, she notes. And although she says her ultimate goal is to turn the district “from a red dot to a blue dot,” it’s no secret that she wants to be that blue dot.“Our system is in desperate straits, and you can either run away and hide or try to be part of the solution,” she says. When asked why she chose Congress for her first foray into politics, rather than a local post, she doesn’t mince words. “I don’t have time for that. The stakes are too high, and I think I’m qualified.” How a Pennsylvania industrial engineer became the odds-on favorite to win a seat in Congress Public health scientist hopes to take his activism to Congress Pennsylvania is a key battleground in the fight for control of the next Congress, and scientists are in the middle of that fight. In February, the state’s highest court threw out a Republican-drawn map of the state’s 18 congressional districts and installed one that, for the most part, eliminates partisan gerrymandering. Those new districts helped push some Republican incumbents into retirement, while at the same time prompting many first-time Democratic candidates to run for seats that now appear winnable.The result is a political free-for-all in which veteran campaign watchers are hedging their bets on who the winners might be. “I haven’t seen a single poll, and without a poll, you can’t begin to make a guess,” says political scientist Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall College (F&M) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center for Politics and Public Affairs and runs the F&M Poll. A crowded field, he says, simply adds to the confusion. This story is the second in a three-part series on candidates with considerable scientific training who are running as Democrats for the U.S. House of Representatives in Pennsylvania. Their first test is the 15 May primary.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Chrissy Houlahan makes her pitch to voters in Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district. Kelly Schulz center_img The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates Postdoc hopes Pennsylvania voters will help her re-engineer how to run for Congress The science vote No more flying soloAsk Houlahan about her childhood, and her answer—“I grew up everywhere”—reflects her military upbringing. Houlahan’s father and one of her grandfathers were U.S. Navy pilots, and her dad’s job flying P-3 Orion antisubmarine reconnaissance planes meant the family would always be along the water. By the time she was a teenager, Houlahan was a certified scuba diver, an open-water swimmer, and a budding marine biologist. Her easy access to both oceans and sky, combined with a strong parental push to study science, led her to put astronaut at the top of her career choices.In her mind, the process began by becoming a pilot. She won an Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship to attend Stanford. However, the military was not welcome on campus when she arrived there in 1985. So every Friday, Houlahan was one of 20 Stanford undergraduates who would pile into cars and drive 40 kilometers to San Jose State University for daylong training.Hostility to the military wasn’t the only obstacle she had to overcome. Engineering classes were typically offered Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—and Houlahan said Stanford made no attempt to accommodate the ROTC students who would be absent. “So ROTC meant you were basically missing one-third of your classes, for 4 years,” she recalls. “And that made it pretty hard to be a very good student.”The size of the ROTC class would eventually dwindle to four, with Houlahan as the only woman. And although her military heritage helped her persevere—“I knew exactly what I was setting myself up for,” she says—she made an unorthodox decision when the Air Force offered her one of its highly competitive slots for pilot training.“I turned them down,” she says. “I had already started dating my husband and was hoping that we would end up making a life together. I had grown up in a wandering lifestyle in which we moved every year. He wasn’t going into the military, and I visualized what his life would be like if I were in the military.”Her classmates and Air Force officials couldn’t believe it, she recalls. “I remember the Air Force was pretty disappointed, and my ROTC cadre was stunned. But it was a lifestyle choice. And we’ve been married for 28 years, so I think I made the right one.”After graduation, Houlahan spent 3 years at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts, which focuses on electronic communications systems. There she worked on air and space defense technologies “one or more generations in the future.” The challenges included figuring out “what types of information people need, and in what order, and with what visual displays, when ballistic missiles are raining down on you” and “how to communicate in a postnuclear war environment.”Corner office to the classroomAfter leaving the military, she made use of her MIT degree, which combined business and engineering courses, to help her husband run a fledgling sports apparel company, AND1. The startup, based here, soon grew to rival industry leader Nike. Its socially responsible benefits included 40 hours of paid community service annually for every employee, which Houlahan invariably used to improve educational opportunities for underserved populations. “And for me,” she says, “that meant women and girls in STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] and communities of color.”Eventually, she decided that she needed to experience the problems facing the nation’s public schools before she could hope to have any impact. So she left an executive position at another startup her husband had co-founded and enrolled in a program for lifelong learners at the University of Pennsylvania, retaking chemistry and taking biology for the first time. She also was accepted into Teach for America, an on-the-job training program that placed her at Simon Gratz High School, a storied but troubled school here.For someone used to working in a corner office, Simon Gratz was an eye-opening experience. “We had some labs, but we didn’t have access to them for most of the year,” she says. A bigger problem, she soon realized, was that “teaching science to kids who are reading really, really below grade level is an impossibility. And my kids were reading at the third or fourth grade level.”Although Teach for America fellows, who are often fresh out of college, must stay in the classroom for 2 years to earn their teaching degree, Houlahan left the program after 1 year. She had learned enough, she says, to understand the importance of literacy in tackling many of the problems facing urban schools. She then joined Springboard Collaborative, a nonprofit based here that aims to improve literacy by creating a year-round learning environment for students that extends into the home and community.A wall of moneyHoulahan says that she and her husband have emphasized to their three children, now adults, the importance of putting their talents to the “highest, best use.” After Donald Trump was elected president, she says, she applied that imperative to herself.“I was raised to respect the democratic process, and the will of the people, and whoever is your commander in chief,” she says. “And this was the first time that I felt I couldn’t do that.”Anticipating that her response to that dilemma might lead her into electoral politics, Houlahan spent the next 3 months exploring what it would take to run a campaign. One day, she appended a note to a fundraising solicitation from Emily’s List, a nonprofit that supports women running for office and to which she regularly donated small amounts. “I want to run for Congress,” she wrote. “What does it take?”Once she made up her mind, Houlahan hit the ground running. She wanted to learn as much as possible about the district. She also wanted to raise enough money to scare off any challengers.“I wanted to put up as big a defense as I could,” she says, “because it doesn’t do anybody any good to fight among ourselves.” Her strategy has been wildly successful: As of 31 March, Houlahan had raised $2 million, a staggering haul for a political novice in the run-up to a primary.Raising vast amounts is “a necessary evil” for first-time candidates like herself who need to introduce themselves to potential voters, she says. “But it’s also a big part of what’s broken in campaigning.” If voters send her to Washington, D.C., she promises to seek ways “to lessen the role of money and increase transparency in campaigning.”Houlahan has also benefited from forces beyond her control. The two-term incumbent Republican who holds the seat, Representative Ryan Costello, dropped out of the race a week after the 20 March filing deadline. That leaves Greg McCauley, a tax lawyer and neophyte candidate, as the only eligible Republican.In another stroke of good luck for Houlahan, the district in which she is running has become decidedly more Democratic since she declared her candidacy. In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out a map apportioning all 18 congressional seats that was created by the state’s Republican-led legislature. The old PA-6 was nearly evenly split between those who voted for Trump and those who supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential race. But Democrats enjoy a 10-point advantage in the newly redrawn district. As a result, political handicappers have shifted the seat from a toss-up to likely Democrat.If Houlahan wins, she will be looking for opportunities to promote her ideas on national security, the economy, and education. She says she’s “pro-business” but progressive on social issues. She’d also like to explore ways to shorten the campaign season—and lessen the incessant need to raise money.“I have been campaigning for 18 months for a job that, if I win, I will hold for 2 years,” she says wearily. “And as near as I can tell, I’ll start fundraising to get re-elected the day after I’m sworn in.”Even so, Houlahan is looking forward to meeting some kindred spirits in Washington, D.C. “I’m hopeful that, if I get elected, there will be a lot of people like me who want to be part of a wave of change. And if there are enough of us, maybe we’ll have the opportunity to make a difference.”*Correction, 9 May, 10:53 p.m.: This story has been updated to correct Houlahan’s age.last_img read more

first_imgAustralian media urged Nick Kyrgios to get a coach, get serious or get out of the game on Thursday after his tempestuous second round exit from his home Australian Open.Kyrgios, playing his first tournament after serving an ATP ban for misconduct, was jeered off the court by sections of the Hisense Arena crowd after squandering a two-set lead and throwing a tantrum to lose in five sets to Italian Andreas Seppi.The 21-year-old also showed an obvious lack of mobility around the court toward the end of the match which he blamed on a knee injury and poor conditioning but he was accused of not trying by tennis great and TV pundit John McEnroe.Kyrgios said he needed a coach to help him with his mental game and was consulting a sports psychologist but there was precious little sympathy in any of Australia’s major daily newspapers.Brisbane’s Courier Mail had a huge splash of Kyrgios on its back page with the graphic of a baby’s dummy being spat from his mouth.”Now Nick off,” the headline read. “Kyrgios loses and acts like a child doing it.”The Australian newspaper led with the headline: “Kyrgios adds to shame file.””Pride has brought him undone. And the fear of commitment. He’s scared of how great he could be,” an editorial in the paper said.”It’s been cooler to exude indifference. Get a coach. Get professional. Or get out of here.”Australia’s former Wimbledon champion Pat Cash, who claimed last year to have discussed a coaching role with the Kyrgios camp, said he would not last “one minute” as his mentor.advertisement”Why would I want to get involved in a job like that?” Cash told Melbourne radio station 3AW.”If it was Lleyton Hewitt, the same thing, Bernard Tomic or Nick Kyrgios or Andy Murray. If they started screaming at me and abusing me in the box, I would just pack up and walk out. I’ve got too much respect for myself.”Kyrgios won three titles in his most consistent season last year but his campaign ended with an ATP ban after he abused spectators, the chair umpire and walked off court during a point in his exit from the Shanghai Masters.His ban was cut to three weeks with his agreement to see a sports psychologist and after winning his first round match at Melbourne Park easily, Kyrgios said he was “in a good space.”It all fell apart against Seppi on Wednesday, however, leaving former players to lament what calibre a player the prodigiously talented Kyrgios might be if he knuckled down.Kyrgios has admitted before to having scant regard for training but his former coach Josh Eagle questioned whether he was training even 15 minutes per day.”Imagine if Nick Kyrgios worked on his tennis game 15 minutes a day,” Eagle, a former Davis Cup coach, told local radio station RSN927.”It sounds crazy, but that’s not actually happening, and he’s still number 13 in the world.”They (other players) would look at him and say ‘wow, what a talent’. On the flip side they say, ‘Imagine if he was working harder, we would not stand a chance against him’.”last_img read more