first_imgThe sister of €130 million lotto winner Frances Connolly says her wealthy sibling would have loved to buy her late mum a holiday home in Bundoran.Ann Floyd said she hasn’t asked for a penny of her sister’s new-found wealth but is delighted for Frances.Ann, who lives in Spamount on the border between Tyrone and Donegal said her sister may have got her luck from her mum. She revealed “Mummy loved going on holidays to Bundoran in Donegal, and to play the slot machines.“She got a great thrill of seeing is she would win.“I think if she had been here now, Frances would have to get her an apartment down by the sea and keep supplying the coins for Mammy – and she would too, that’s the kind of person Frances is.“Frances is so generous and has always been. If Frances only had a tenner and you said you needed a fiver, she’d give it to you and do without it herself. That’s the kind of woman she is.” Ann and her hubby Patrick say they have made out a list of 50 people whim they will give some money to after their huge windfall last week.Apartment in Bundoran for mother would have been top of lotto winner’s list was last modified: January 11th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:apartmentbundorandonegallottomillionairesTyronelast_img read more

first_imgThis week’s warm and sunny weather forecast in most parts of the state likely has many digging out their garden gloves and playing in the dirt. But before you head to a big-box store to purchase your seeds and plants, the state’s land conservancies and family farms hope you’ll consider heirloom varieties.Nancy Long and her husband, Harold, of Long Family Farms and Gallery, exclusively plant vegetables on their farm in Cherokee County that was passed down from the Eastern Band of Cherokee.“There’s the ability to share with others by sharing the seeds and the stories and the memories,” she says. “Like, it might be, ‘Oh, these were grandpa’s butter beans or grandma’s favorite tomato.’ All these seeds have so many different stories and the memories that go along with it.”Harold Long, a member of the Cherokee, recently traveled to Oklahoma to retrieve Cherokee tan pumpkin seeds, once thought lost but found on a farm there. They’ve since shared the seeds through an outreach program. The Mainspring Conservation Trust has conservation easements on four farms in Cherokee and Clay counties to help preserve farms such as the Longs’.Land conservancies are able to preserve farmland through the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service Farm Bill, currently up for renewal in Congress.Sara Posey is the Hiwassee Programs Manager for the Mainspring Conservation Trust and says beyond the importance of preserving horticulture history, maintaining a variety helps protect the food supply.“When we’re in a monoculture, we are susceptible to insect blights, and if we only have one strain of a plant, then it’s gone and that’s the resurgence with heirloom,” she explains. “They are all genetically different.”Long says people who have heirloom plants and vegetables on their own land can help secure the long-term history of varieties for generations to come.“If more people would take an interest and have seed exchanges, more of the seeds would be able to get into other people’s hands, so really in order to save a seed, you have to share them,” Long adds.Recently, the University of North Carolina-Asheville hosted a seed exchange. The Carolina Farm Stewardship Association has a similar program.last_img read more

first_imgIt’s still illegal to grow marijuana in Missouri…especially if you don’t own the land where you plant the pot.Audrain County authorities this week charged three men with drug manufacturing and trespassing.Investigators found the grow operations in rural areas north of Centralia and southeast of Laddonia.The suspects are 57-year-old Lindall Keeter and 67-year-old Maurice Nolan of Auxvasse, and 69-year-old Robert Haynes of Mexico.last_img