first_img Liverpool fans will be surprised to see Firmino and Salah benched getty Explaining his decisions…Thoughts on Jurgen Klopp’s team selection for #LIVEVE, @LFC fans?#PLonPrime pic.twitter.com/CvV1Ns1eBr— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) December 4, 2019Klopp made five changes in total, with James Milner and Adam Lallana coming in for midfielders Jordan Henderson and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, while Adrian replaced goalkeeper Alisson, who is suspended after receiving a red card in the 2-1 win over Brighton and Hove Albion on Saturday.“One change we had to do in Adrian for Alisson, and the other four we wanted to do, just to respect the game, to respect the intensity of the game first and foremost,” Klopp told the media.“We did it because we can do it. I have to show the respect for the boys and I’ve said a lot of times how much I like the squad and now we have to use it.“That’s the line-up for today because we think the game will be really intense and for this you need kind of fresh legs and we try to bring them in.” 1center_img Everton boss Marco Silva, meanwhile, stuck with the Everton side which started in Sunday’s 2-1 defeat to Leicester City.The Reds are hoping to extend their lead at the top of the Premier League, having seen Man City move back to within eight points of the Reds with a defeat of Burnley on Tuesday. Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp has explained why he rung the changes to his line-up for the visit of Everton at Anfield.Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino are on the bench for the clash at Anfield, with Divock Origi and Xherdan Shaqiri coming in.last_img read more

first_imgThe move comes after a week in which Aberdeen lost twice to Rangers in back-to-back Premiership fixtures with the Ibrox side under the temporary stewardship of Under-20s coach Graeme Murty.Following the second defeat, a 2-1 loss at Pittodrie, McInnes made clear his frustration at the links with Rangers, saying the speculation had “dragged on and on”. He had previously endorsed the comments of Aberdeen chairman Stewart Milne, who had said that the manager was happy in his current role and was “going nowhere”.The ongoing links with a Rangers move for McInnes increased after Rangers chairman Dave King told the club’s AGM that a shortlist of candidates included managers under contract elsewhere.McInnes, who previously managed St Johnstone and Bristol City, has seen his stock rise since succeeding Craig Brown at Pittodrie in 2014. He won the League Cup in 2014 and has led the Dons to the runners-up spot in the Premiership in the last three seasons. Aberdeen have refused a request from Rangers for permission to speak to Derek McInnes about their managerial vacancy.McInnes’ name has been linked with the job since Caixinha was sacked on October 26 and Rangers have now made a move to begin discussions.However, in a brief statement on their official website, Aberdeen said: “Aberdeen Football Club has announced this evening that Rangers have contacted the club asking for permission to speak to Derek McInnes and that permission has been refused.”Compensation would have to be agreed between the sides if McInnes was to return to the club he served as a player between 1995 and 2000. STV understands that the figure is in the region of £1.1m. His achievements in the north east drew the attention of Sunderland in the summer but, after Aberdeen allowed him to hold talk with the Wearside club, McInnes decided against a move, signing a new contract at Pittodrie shortly afterwards.last_img read more

first_imgDingaan Thobela established himself as a charismatic, gifted fighter and a favourite of the South African public.Former boxing champion Dingaan Thobela is known as “The Rose of Soweto”.(Image: Cara Viereckl, via IOL)Brand South Africa reporterDingaan Thobela has proved himself as one of South Africa’s most talented boxers, although perhaps not the most hardworking fighter. The charismatic Thobela started his professional career in 1986 as a junior welterweight, but has since moved up to the light heavyweight ranks – representing a rise of almost 16 kilograms.He has even spoken of possibly campaigning as a heavyweight whether he was serious or not remains to be seen.After an amateur career that saw him win 80 times and lose just three bouts, Thobela’s first professional fight pitted him against Quinton Ryan, a bout he won in four rounds. The slick-punching Thobela was held to a draw in his fourth fight, but proceeded to win 25 fights in a row over the next five years, registering 19 wins by knockout along the way.Dingaan Thobela starts his professional career in 1986 as a junior welterweight, but later moved up to the light heavyweight ranks – representing a rise of almost 16 kilograms. (Image: African Ring)Fighting outside South AfricaAs he scored more and more wins, Thobela became increasingly marketable and began to fight outside of South Africa. In 1990, three of his five fights were in the United States and all three ended in victories, two by knockout over Pascual Aranda and Mauricio Aceves who he both disposed of in the fifth round.In 1991, Thobela’s three contests were all won on points, and in 1992 he fought only twice, defeating Tony Foster over eight rounds and stopping Peter Till in nine rounds.At the beginning of February 1993, “The Rose of Soweto” took on Tony Lopez for the WBA lightweight title. Lopez had previously fought twice against South African boxing legend Brian Mitchell. Mitchell, who retired as WBA champion after 13 successful title defences, had fought Lopez in Sacramento on both occasions. The first bout ended in a controversial draw and Mitchell left the matter in no doubt the second time around.Controversial lossThobela discovered how difficult it was to win in Lopez’ backyard when he lost on a controversial points decision. Four months later he faced Lopez at Sun City, and this time he captured the title.Thobela made his first defence in October, but came up against a superior fighter in the unbeaten Orzubek Nazarov, who claimed a convincing 12-round decision. Thobela challenged for the title again in March 1994, but Nazarov had his number and won over 12 rounds in a repeat of his previous victory. Later in the year Thobela faced journeyman Karl Taylor in England and was surprisingly knocked out in the eighth round of their contest.In 1995 Thobela got back on track with five victories, all of them by knockout, and added a further two KO victories by June 1996. However, matters went haywire again for “The Rose” when he faced Geoff McCreesh in November. McCreesh, who came into the fight with a record of 15 wins and three losses, mostly against little-known British opponents, stunned Thobela in the second round, sending the South African to the canvas for a huge upset victory.Beaten by a journeymanIn his next fight, in March 1997, Thobela was beaten by American journeyman Willy Wise, who came into the fight with 21 wins – only six by knockout – three losses and four draws. The South African was favoured to win, but Wise secured a points victory.Questions were being asked about Thobela’s commitment, but he secured a big win later in the year, defeating fellow South African Gary Murray on a fourth-round TKO. In 1998 he fought only once, drawing against Carlos Baldomir over 12 rounds. Thobela looked rusty and out of shape and doubts grew about his boxing career.However, he returned for two fights in 1999. He won in seven rounds against Walter Danett, but was beaten on points by Cornelius Carr for the WBF middleweight title.World title winIn early 2000 he won a points decision over Soon Botes to earn a crack at Glen Catley’s WBC super middleweight title. The Briton was heavily favoured to retain his crown, but Thobela, way behind on all three judges’ scorecards, staged a strong finish, dramatically knocking Catley out with only seconds remaining in the bout. He was once again a world champion.As had happened previously, Thobela was unable to defend his world title, losing to Canada’s Dave Hilton on a controversial points decision in Montreal. Shortly afterwards, Hilton was jailed for rape and Thobela was given another crack at the title against Eric Lucas in November 2001. He struggled to make the weight, however, and Lucas dominated the fight before winning on a TKO in the eighth round.Thobela was a natural: a gifted boxer who, at the the height of his career, established himself as a charismatic, gifted fighter and a favourite of the South African public.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

first_imgOn March 9, @shrmnextchat chatted with the SHRM Government Affairs Team about the SHRM Employment Law & Legislative Conference.  In case you missed this important chat filled with great insights about HR advocacy, you can see all the tweets here: [View the story “#Nextchat RECAP: SHRM Employment Law & Legislative Conference” on Storify]last_img

first_img Kathryn Shelton is Director of Chapter Advancement for America’s Future Foundation. AFF San Francisco officially launched with a Happy Hour on Thursday, April 23, 2015. 40 liberty-minded locals gathered at the Slate SF lounge to toast liberty and celebrate AFF’s expansion to the West Coast. Located in the heart of San Francisco’s Mission District – an historic and iconic cultural neighborhood – Slate SF provided an ideal setting to discuss and celebrate America’s history, exceptionalism and future.The evening began with a welcome from Paul Doherty, AFF-San Francisco’s Chapter Leader, followed by remarks from Sally Pipes, President and CEO of the Pacific Research Institute.Sally discussed PRI’s mission and recent work, and then spoke about Obamacare and its alternatives. She concluded that young people need to have an active voice for liberty in order to make real social change.last_img read more

first_img This weekend, American Dreaming Magazine’s Pop Up Food Court returns for another round of delicious madness. Philly’s top food vendors wil be on the scene with an amazing selection of delectable treats. From fancy burgers and dogs to tasty ice cream, ‘tots and more—the hardest part will be deciding where to start, and when to stop. Event Details American Dreaming: Pop-Up Food Court When: Saturday, December 23, 2 – 8 p.m. Where: The Dreaming Building, 618 N. Front Street Cost: Free More Info: RSVP here American Dreaming: Pop Up Food Courtlast_img read more

first_imgA pair of old fishing buddies is now steering the ship at the Scripps Research Institute, one of the world’s largest private basic biomedical research institutes. Today, Steve Kay, formerly the dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles was announced as Scripps’s president, whereas Peter Schultz, currently a Scripps chemist and director of the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr) in San Diego, was named CEO. Kay will be in charge of day-to-day operations, whereas Schultz will lay out Scripps’s long-term strategic plan.The announcement likely brings to a close a contentious chapter at Scripps, which has campuses in San Diego, California, and Jupiter, Florida. Just over a year ago, Scripps faculty led a revolt against the institute’s former leadership amid financial troubles and merger discussions with USC. The appointments also portend a new push aimed at marrying the institute’s historical strength in basic biomedical research with translational medicine designed to turn research leads into novel treatments.“It’s a very exciting move,” says Peter Kim, formerly the head of the Merck Research Laboratories and now a biochemist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. In addition to running Calibr, Schultz previously led the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF), and has been a founder of eight startups involved in using robotics and other high throughput technologies to advance biomedicine and materials science. Before joining USC, Kay also worked with Schultz at Scripps and GNF. Together the pair has raised well over $1 billion in backing from pharma companies, foundations, and private donations in their recent positions.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Scripps is “very fortunate” to have landed both to share the top duties at the institute, Kim says. Phil Baran, a Scripps chemist and member of the search committee that selected Kay and Schultz, agrees. “I think everyone here will be relieved that we have icons charting the course of the ship, which will let us go back to doing science,” he says.The ship’s previous course got a bit turbulent. Last July, Scripps’s board of trustees called off merger talks with USC after the Scripps faculty revolted. The potential marriage was offered as a way out of the red for Scripps, which had seen a sharp drop in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). USC at the time was flush, in the midst of a $6 billion capital campaign. The university also has a medical school, which meant potentially easier access to clinical research for Scripps’s stable of basic biomedical researchers. But Scripps faculty feared loss of autonomy and objected loudly to news of the merger talks. Ultimately, Scripps’s then-President and CEO Michael Marletta resigned, cell biologist Jim Paulson was named as an interim president and CEO, and a search committee was formed to find a new direction.An emphasis on translationThe centerpiece of this new direction, say Kay and Schultz, will be a long-term push into translational research. Like most academic institutions, today Scripps sticks mainly to basic research, discovering the molecular underpinnings of health and disease. Pharmaceutical companies, by contrast, focus most of their efforts at the other end of the drug development pipeline, moving potential drug compounds through human clinical trials into the market. The space between basic science and drug approval—the translational piece—has come to be known as the “valley of death,” because many promising findings never make it to market. Translational researchers must take promising early-stage compounds and go through a host of refinements to improve measures such as how long compounds last in the body and how well they move through the bloodstream, find their targets, and minimize their toxicity.Kay and Schultz say they plan to form alliances with Calibr and other institutes to ease the path for Scripps faculty to do much of this translational research in house. By doing so, they say, this will ensure that more compounds make it into human trials, bring extra licensing royalties into the institute, and, ultimately, improve the lives of patients. “If we are successful, not only are we making new medicines that can help people, we are potentially creating additional financial resources [for Scripps],” Schultz says.Scripps already has a strong track record for getting medicines into the clinic. According to the institute, eight compounds originally discovered at Scripps are now on the market, while another 30 are in various stages of clinical development. Those were developed, in part, as a byproduct of previous alliances in which pharmaceutical companies payed for rights to develop would-be drugs discovered at Scripps, as well as through the more traditional approach of licensing early-stage compounds to startup companies that then raise money to develop them further.That model, particularly finding institutional backing from pharma companies, “probably no longer works,” Schultz says. Today, large pharma companies are more averse to risking money on unproven therapies, and thus more apt to sit on the sidelines until compounds advance at least until early-stage human clinical trials. That forces biotech companies that license compounds to do much of the translational research themselves, something they aren’t always best suited to do.To make matters worse, when research institutes license their promising compounds very early in development, the terms of such deals often aren’t great for the basic researchers. The institute doesn’t get much money, and researchers lose control over what happens to their compounds, says Patrick Griffin, who runs a translational research center at Scripps in Florida. Many compounds then go on to fail—not because they aren’t effective, Griffin adds, but because companies decide to move in a different business direction. “If you can move a [would-be drug] along in a nonprofit, you can nurture it so it has a better opportunity to advance,” Griffin says. “Fewer will fail, and you will have more shots on goal,” of making it to market, he says.Those extra shots are critical, Griffin and others say, because 95% of all would-be drugs fail during development. When costs of the failures are added in, the price of bringing a new drug to market is well over $1 billion. That has not only caused large pharma companies to back away from early-stage drug discovery, but it has forced them to pursue primarily large-market blockbuster drugs for common conditions such as heart disease and cancer, while avoiding medicines for rare diseases.As a nonprofit focused on translational research, Calibr has already begun to change this arrangement in a small way. Today, the institute, which opened in 2012, has a staff of only about 110 people and an annual budget of some $25 million. But thanks to early progress on would-be drugs for neglected diseases, Calibr has already attracted funding from nonprofit foundations such as the Wellcome Trust, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Schultz says the institute expects to put four to six drugs into the clinic over the next year or two.Cutting costsSchultz and Kay plan to take more immediate actions to shore up Scripps’s finances. According to a July report by Fitch, a bond rating agency, Scripps’ finances are “stable.” But the institute has operated in the red for years, and has been forced to cover its deficit by drawing down its endowment, which shrunk from $430 million in fiscal year 2012 to $397 million in fiscal year 2014.One move that could save $12 million annually would be to replace nearly 37,000 square meters of leased lab space with two newly constructed buildings owned by Scripps. Schultz and Kay say they continue to explore an existing plan to raise more than $100 million to pay for the buildings. “That would have a big impact pretty quick,” Griffin says. But ultimately, he says, Scripps’s stability will be decided on how effective Schultz and Kay are in hooking together formerly disparate parts of the drug development pipeline, and how many would-be drugs the fishing buddies manage to snare in their net.*Correction, 18 September, 3:07 p.m.: This story incorrectly identified Scripps as the world’s largest basic biomedical research institute. It is among the world’s largest private biomedical research institutes.last_img read more

first_imgHome grown manufacturer iBall has officiallyannounced the availability of its first octa-core tablet offering: the SlideOcta A41. The iBall Slide Octa A41 3G voice-calling tablet is now up for grabsat a price tag of Rs.14,999.    The company had earlier listed the tablet on itsofficial website without pricing and availability details.The iBall Slide Octa A41 features a 7-inch IPSfull-HD display with a 1920×1080 pixels resolution. It is powered by a 1.7GHzocta-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor coupled with 2GB of RAM. It comes with 16GB ofinbuilt storage expandable up to 32GB via microSD card.The single-SIM voice-calling tablet runs Android 4.4KitKat out-of-the-box. It sports an 8MP rear autofocus camera with LED flashand a 5MP front-facing snapper.    Connectivity options on the device include: Wi-Fi,3G, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, 3G and USB. It decks in a 3500mAh battery.  Recently, the company introduced the Slide 3G Q7218tablet. The device is currently available at a best buy price of Rs. 6,499. The iBall Slide 3G Q7218 tablet features a 7-inchdisplay (480×800 p resolution) and has a 1.3GHz quad-core Cortex-A7 processor beatingunder the hood. It comes with 512MB of RAM, 8GB of internal storage expandableup to 32GB via microSD card. It packs in a 2500mAh battery.last_img read more

first_img Grand Bahama man pleads guilty in Exuma marijuana bust; four others charged in court Million dollar marijuana drug bust in Exuma Recommended for you Related Items:blue hills, marijuana, police Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 17 jul 2015 – A second marijuana farm has been unearthed by TCI Police; this time the growing garden was found in Blue Hills in a search yesterday afternoon where 90 cannabis plants, weighing eight pounds were discovered in plant pots. The street value of the suspected marijuana is $36,320. Police explained: “At approximately 4pm yesterday (Thursday 16 July 2015), officers attached to multiple units conducted a systematic search of a bushy area near Maranatha High School in Blue Hills. During the search of that bushy area, police discovered 90 plant pots each containing a Cannabis plant with an average height of three feet.” No one was arrested during the illicit drug raid as reportedly, no one was at the site. Bahamas Police arrest two for armed robbery, 40lbs of ‘ganga’ Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

first_imgKolkata: In a word of advice to the trade union leaders, state Power minister and Indian National Trinamool Trade Union Congress (INTTUC) leader Sobhandeb Chattopadhyay said on Tuesday that the former should not indulge in lockouts of factories or companies, in order to claim their rights. “You have to press for your rights but not at the cost of keeping the gates of your company closed. You have to continue the flow of work. Your slogan should be Struggle is Our Right, Struggle for Better Living, Production is our Target,” Chattopadhyay said, addressing the 42nd meeting of Kolkata Municipal Corporation Employees and Workers Union. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe minister slammed the previous Left Front unions, for pursuing destructive movements to claim their rights and reiterated that INTTUC should not demand for their rights at the cost of stalling work. He stressed that the union should work for betterment of the people working in the unorganised sector, as more than 50 crore people in the country work in this sector, in comparison to 4 crore labourers working in the organised sector.Meanwhile, state Labour minister Moloy Ghatak reiterated the various steps taken by the Mamata Banerjee government, for betterment of the living standards of workers in the unorganised sector. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”During the Left Front rule, the jute mill workers got a meagre Rs 100 as daily wage. Now, they are getting Rs 257 a day and Dearness Allowance (DA) every six months. Not a single jute mill in the state is closed,” Ghatak said.He slammed the Narendra Modi government at the Centre, for its indifferent attitude towards the labourers. Central PSUs like Burn Standard and Hindustan Cables have closed down and many people have lost their jobs. “Now, the Centre is trying to close down 21 coal blocks in Asansol. But we will not let them do so,” the Labour minister said.last_img read more