first_img0Shares0000LIBREVILLE, Gabon February 10 – A narrower than expected first-round victory over Sudan set the trend for the progress of star-studded Ivory Coast to the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations final against Zambia at Stade de l’Amitie Sunday.Captain Didier Drogba nodded the only goal of the Group B game off a Salomon Kalou cross shortly before half-time, with the second-half avalanche never materialising. Tired of pretty football that won nothing, the Ivorians no longer cared how they won as long as they won and coach Francois Zahoui made no excuses for his pragmatic approach.“If we win with a header from a corner in the final minute of extra time that is good enough for me. I have a mission which is to lead this team to the final,” stressed the 49-year-old ex-professional who played in Italy and France.The message was clear to a nation waiting with increased desperation since 1992 for a second Cup of Nations title — the Elephants were not interested in style, just success.And after five victories on the trot Ivory Coast are in their third final — they lost a 2006 shootout against hosts Egypt — and appear capable of defeating sentimental favourites Zambia.Victory over Sudan was followed by a 2-0 win against west African neighbours Burkina Faso with an early Kalou goal supplemented by a late own goal from Bakary Kone.Zahoui, who replaced popular but too expensive Swede Sven Goran Eriksson after a first round exit from the 2010 World Cup, demonstrated his strength in depth against Angola by fielding a ‘B’ team and coasting to a 2-0 win.Former first choice Emmanuel Eboue and impressive Wilfried Bony netted for a team containing only two regulars, England-based centre-backs Kolo Toure and Souleymane Bamba.Drogba brushed off having a penalty saved against quarter-final opponents and co-hosts Equatorial Guinea to score in each half before 2011 African Footballer of the Year Yaya Toure iced the cake with a superb late goal via a free kick.Surprise semi-finalists Mali proved a much tougher nut to crack in Libreville and it took a glorious goal from previously misfiring Gervinho on the stroke of half-time to separate the sides.The dreadlocked Arsenal goal poacher created space down the left flank with a back heel, raced forward with the ball seemingly glued to his boot and gave goalkeeper Soumaila Diakite no chance from close range.The last time Ivory Coast won the tournament they did not concede a goal in five matches, three of which went to extra time, and the class of 2012 has kept five clean sheets ahead of the showdown with the Chipolopolo (Copper Bullets).0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

first_img17 January 2014 The Saldanha Bay Industrial Development Zone, launched late last year, is already drawing strong international interest, with several lease agreements signed and a surge of global oil and gas companies negotiating joint ventures with South African firms, the Western Cape provincial government said on Thursday. “The Saldanha Bay IDZ Licencing Company has signed six lease agreements with international and South African oil and gas companies,” Western Cape Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Minister Alan Winde said in a statement. “These include firms specialising in oilfield services, oil rig operations, logistics operators, ship repair, engineering and market support.” Final negotiations for lease agreements are taking place between the Licencing Company and two international oilfield service companies and a South African rig repair firm, Winde said. “In some of the most exciting developments, the Licencing Company is in talks with an international consortium to develop a rig module building facility. We are also aware of a R200-million investment by a global oil servicing company which is set to create 300 jobs. Several leading international companies are increasing their staff numbers in their South African companies.” Winde said details on individual companies were bound by non-disclosure agreements and could not be released at this stage.African oil, gas service and supply hub A feasibility study conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry found that Saldanha Bay is strategically located to serve as a service, maintenance, fabrication and supply hub for the booming African oil and gas sector, due to the increasing number of oil rigs requiring maintenance, and their traffic flow passing from the west to the east coast of Africa. In October last year, German company Oiltanking GmbH entered a joint venture with a number of South African companies to build a commercial crude oil storage and blending terminal at the port of Saldanha. The company said that Saldanha was an excellent location for a crude oil hub, “as it is close to strategic tanker routes from key oil-producing regions to major oil-consuming markets”. Ideally situated for the blending of west African and South American crude oils, Saldanha “has the potential to establish itself as a global crude transhipment hub focused on certain established trade routes,” the company added. The Western Cape government has invested R25-million over five years in setting up the industrial development zone (IDZ). “This is the culmination of years of collaboration between all spheres of government and the Saldanha Bay community,” Winde said. “The IDZ has the potential to become one of the most important levers for jobs and economic growth for the Western Cape. Early indications are that it will indeed be a major catalyst for foreign direct investment and increased employment opportunities for our residents in the medium to long term.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

first_imgThey are only four counties: Brazil, Russia, India and China, the so-called BRIC countries. Today their economies still are fairly small compared to the US, Europe and Japan. IDC estimates the total global IT market to be $1.16trn compared to $85.1bn for BRIC. But that is changing quickly. By 2050, 44 percent of the world’s GDP will be generated from those four countries, and by that time 18 of the planet’s 20 largest cities will be located outside North America and Western Europe.Jonathan Schwartz, CEO for Sun, sees BRIC as a tremendous opportunity. Of course, Sun is not alone in pursuing the this huge growing market. But unlike Oracle, IBM, Microsoft and many others that are investing in these countries, Sun has a different approach: Open Source. Schwartz sees Sun’s investment in Open Source hardware and software as eventually paying off big time. But in the short term, Sun isn’t seeking huge growth in revenues from these developing nations. It will take much time and patience.Schwartz said that “gain in revenue will be a derivative of market share gain in adoption”. Sun is following Red Hat’s model where economic success followed a period of growth and acceptance by the open source community. Sun will be increasing their presence in these countries over the next three to five years.One example of their approach is with recent negotiations that they’ve had with the Chinese government to adopt the design for a computer processor contributed by Sun to the Open Source community. It’s not clear that high adoption rates of Open Source projects will lead to eventual long-term revenues, but the approach sets Sun apart from other companies.“We are trying to focus in on the next wave of developers, next wave of students, the next wave of research, the next wave of economic growth to best position Sun for growth in the next decade, not the next few weeks or next quarter,” said Schwartz.It’s a refreshing approach, compared to most of corporate America’s focus on short-term revenue and growth.last_img read more

first_img By Jeffrey MervisMay. 8, 2018 , 9:00 AM Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidatesPHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA—Before Chrissy Houlahan decided to run for Congress in southeastern Pennsylvania, she made a list of things she felt anyone serving in that body needed to understand. At the top were how to protect the country, how to grow the economy, and how to educate the nation’s children.Houlahan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and a master’s degree in technology policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, realized she was well-suited to tackle all three questions with her experience as a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, an executive with two successful startup companies, and a chemistry teacher in an urban high school. But before throwing her hat into the ring, Houlahan applied one more lesson from her time in the classroom, on the job, and in the military: She gamed out a way to win the election.Some 15 months later, Houlahan has implemented that plan to perfection. Thanks in part to a near-flawless campaign and prodigious fundraising, she is now the only Democrat on the 15 May primary ballot for Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district (PA-6), an area southwest of here. Because of some good fortune, she’s also a heavy favorite to win the general election in November for what is now an open seat.The 50-year-old Houlahan says she isn’t afraid of competition. “But it’s very draining if there are lots of us [Democrats] fighting among ourselves” in the primary election, she notes. And although she says her ultimate goal is to turn the district “from a red dot to a blue dot,” it’s no secret that she wants to be that blue dot.“Our system is in desperate straits, and you can either run away and hide or try to be part of the solution,” she says. When asked why she chose Congress for her first foray into politics, rather than a local post, she doesn’t mince words. “I don’t have time for that. The stakes are too high, and I think I’m qualified.” How a Pennsylvania industrial engineer became the odds-on favorite to win a seat in Congress Public health scientist hopes to take his activism to Congress Pennsylvania is a key battleground in the fight for control of the next Congress, and scientists are in the middle of that fight. In February, the state’s highest court threw out a Republican-drawn map of the state’s 18 congressional districts and installed one that, for the most part, eliminates partisan gerrymandering. Those new districts helped push some Republican incumbents into retirement, while at the same time prompting many first-time Democratic candidates to run for seats that now appear winnable.The result is a political free-for-all in which veteran campaign watchers are hedging their bets on who the winners might be. “I haven’t seen a single poll, and without a poll, you can’t begin to make a guess,” says political scientist Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall College (F&M) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center for Politics and Public Affairs and runs the F&M Poll. A crowded field, he says, simply adds to the confusion. This story is the second in a three-part series on candidates with considerable scientific training who are running as Democrats for the U.S. House of Representatives in Pennsylvania. 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Kelly Schulz center_img The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates Postdoc hopes Pennsylvania voters will help her re-engineer how to run for Congress The science vote No more flying soloAsk Houlahan about her childhood, and her answer—“I grew up everywhere”—reflects her military upbringing. Houlahan’s father and one of her grandfathers were U.S. Navy pilots, and her dad’s job flying P-3 Orion antisubmarine reconnaissance planes meant the family would always be along the water. By the time she was a teenager, Houlahan was a certified scuba diver, an open-water swimmer, and a budding marine biologist. Her easy access to both oceans and sky, combined with a strong parental push to study science, led her to put astronaut at the top of her career choices.In her mind, the process began by becoming a pilot. She won an Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship to attend Stanford. However, the military was not welcome on campus when she arrived there in 1985. So every Friday, Houlahan was one of 20 Stanford undergraduates who would pile into cars and drive 40 kilometers to San Jose State University for daylong training.Hostility to the military wasn’t the only obstacle she had to overcome. Engineering classes were typically offered Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—and Houlahan said Stanford made no attempt to accommodate the ROTC students who would be absent. “So ROTC meant you were basically missing one-third of your classes, for 4 years,” she recalls. “And that made it pretty hard to be a very good student.”The size of the ROTC class would eventually dwindle to four, with Houlahan as the only woman. And although her military heritage helped her persevere—“I knew exactly what I was setting myself up for,” she says—she made an unorthodox decision when the Air Force offered her one of its highly competitive slots for pilot training.“I turned them down,” she says. “I had already started dating my husband and was hoping that we would end up making a life together. I had grown up in a wandering lifestyle in which we moved every year. He wasn’t going into the military, and I visualized what his life would be like if I were in the military.”Her classmates and Air Force officials couldn’t believe it, she recalls. “I remember the Air Force was pretty disappointed, and my ROTC cadre was stunned. But it was a lifestyle choice. And we’ve been married for 28 years, so I think I made the right one.”After graduation, Houlahan spent 3 years at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts, which focuses on electronic communications systems. There she worked on air and space defense technologies “one or more generations in the future.” The challenges included figuring out “what types of information people need, and in what order, and with what visual displays, when ballistic missiles are raining down on you” and “how to communicate in a postnuclear war environment.”Corner office to the classroomAfter leaving the military, she made use of her MIT degree, which combined business and engineering courses, to help her husband run a fledgling sports apparel company, AND1. The startup, based here, soon grew to rival industry leader Nike. Its socially responsible benefits included 40 hours of paid community service annually for every employee, which Houlahan invariably used to improve educational opportunities for underserved populations. “And for me,” she says, “that meant women and girls in STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] and communities of color.”Eventually, she decided that she needed to experience the problems facing the nation’s public schools before she could hope to have any impact. So she left an executive position at another startup her husband had co-founded and enrolled in a program for lifelong learners at the University of Pennsylvania, retaking chemistry and taking biology for the first time. She also was accepted into Teach for America, an on-the-job training program that placed her at Simon Gratz High School, a storied but troubled school here.For someone used to working in a corner office, Simon Gratz was an eye-opening experience. “We had some labs, but we didn’t have access to them for most of the year,” she says. A bigger problem, she soon realized, was that “teaching science to kids who are reading really, really below grade level is an impossibility. And my kids were reading at the third or fourth grade level.”Although Teach for America fellows, who are often fresh out of college, must stay in the classroom for 2 years to earn their teaching degree, Houlahan left the program after 1 year. She had learned enough, she says, to understand the importance of literacy in tackling many of the problems facing urban schools. She then joined Springboard Collaborative, a nonprofit based here that aims to improve literacy by creating a year-round learning environment for students that extends into the home and community.A wall of moneyHoulahan says that she and her husband have emphasized to their three children, now adults, the importance of putting their talents to the “highest, best use.” After Donald Trump was elected president, she says, she applied that imperative to herself.“I was raised to respect the democratic process, and the will of the people, and whoever is your commander in chief,” she says. “And this was the first time that I felt I couldn’t do that.”Anticipating that her response to that dilemma might lead her into electoral politics, Houlahan spent the next 3 months exploring what it would take to run a campaign. One day, she appended a note to a fundraising solicitation from Emily’s List, a nonprofit that supports women running for office and to which she regularly donated small amounts. “I want to run for Congress,” she wrote. “What does it take?”Once she made up her mind, Houlahan hit the ground running. She wanted to learn as much as possible about the district. She also wanted to raise enough money to scare off any challengers.“I wanted to put up as big a defense as I could,” she says, “because it doesn’t do anybody any good to fight among ourselves.” Her strategy has been wildly successful: As of 31 March, Houlahan had raised $2 million, a staggering haul for a political novice in the run-up to a primary.Raising vast amounts is “a necessary evil” for first-time candidates like herself who need to introduce themselves to potential voters, she says. “But it’s also a big part of what’s broken in campaigning.” If voters send her to Washington, D.C., she promises to seek ways “to lessen the role of money and increase transparency in campaigning.”Houlahan has also benefited from forces beyond her control. The two-term incumbent Republican who holds the seat, Representative Ryan Costello, dropped out of the race a week after the 20 March filing deadline. That leaves Greg McCauley, a tax lawyer and neophyte candidate, as the only eligible Republican.In another stroke of good luck for Houlahan, the district in which she is running has become decidedly more Democratic since she declared her candidacy. In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out a map apportioning all 18 congressional seats that was created by the state’s Republican-led legislature. The old PA-6 was nearly evenly split between those who voted for Trump and those who supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential race. But Democrats enjoy a 10-point advantage in the newly redrawn district. As a result, political handicappers have shifted the seat from a toss-up to likely Democrat.If Houlahan wins, she will be looking for opportunities to promote her ideas on national security, the economy, and education. She says she’s “pro-business” but progressive on social issues. She’d also like to explore ways to shorten the campaign season—and lessen the incessant need to raise money.“I have been campaigning for 18 months for a job that, if I win, I will hold for 2 years,” she says wearily. “And as near as I can tell, I’ll start fundraising to get re-elected the day after I’m sworn in.”Even so, Houlahan is looking forward to meeting some kindred spirits in Washington, D.C. “I’m hopeful that, if I get elected, there will be a lot of people like me who want to be part of a wave of change. And if there are enough of us, maybe we’ll have the opportunity to make a difference.”*Correction, 9 May, 10:53 p.m.: This story has been updated to correct Houlahan’s age.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Police on Sunday said that three persons were arrested for beating a pregnant woman on suspicion of child kidnapping in North East Delhi’s Harsh Vihar area.Police identified the accused as Deepak (27), B Shakuntala (52) and Lalit Kumar (29). All the accused are the residents of Mandoli. Deputy Commissioner of Police (Northeast) Atul Kumar Thakur said a case has been registered at the Harsh Vihar police station under Indian Penal Code sections for voluntarily causing hurt and wrongful restraint. “The victim is deaf and we have registered a case. The suo motu was taken by police,” said DCP Thakur. In the social media an alleged video of the incident taking rounds. According to police, further investigation in the case is going on to check the involvement of other people who were present at the spot.last_img read more