first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — Confidence can breed success, and after the first half of its WIAA playoff opener on March 6 at Chippewa Falls, the Marshfield boys basketball team had plenty of it.The Tigers got hot from the 3-point line early and went on to knock off Chippewa Falls 57-34, scoring their most points in a game in over a month.Marshfield took that momentum into last Saturday’s Division 1 regional final at Hudson, putting up a season-high 67 points in a 67-61 victory to win its second-straight regional championship. The Tigers (8-16) came back from an eight-point deficit in the second half to pull out the win.Marshfield (8-16) will play Superior (20-4) in a WIAA Division 1 sectional semifinal at 7 p.m. Thursday at Eau Claire North High School. The winner will take on either Stevens Point (23-1) or Neenah (20-4) in a sectional final Saturday night at Wausau West High School.“We shot it well, and I thought we defended the heck out of Chippewa Falls,” Marshfield coach Bill Zuiker said. “We went in knowing it would be tough. They had beat us earlier in the year, but they had lost their last game and weren’t really flying high going into the playoffs.“These kids all season, they haven’t quit and haven’t given up on themselves or on me, and they got a payoff out of it. I was so thrilled they could realize some rewards. They worked hard and prepared hard.”Marshfield struggled offensively for much of the season, scoring 50 points or more only twice in its last nine games.The Tigers were able to turn it around in the two playoff wins and embrace an underdog mentality, something that was the complete opposite of last season when Marshfield was a No. 1 seed and expected to make a run to the sectionals.“Coach gets us prepared every night for who we are going to play, and we’re just playing basketball,” senior guard Caleb Alexander said.Marshfield got big games from different players each night.In the semifinal win over Chippewa Falls, Tanner Boson was 5-for-6 and Alexander was 3-for-4 from 3-point range, scoring 22 and 15 points, respectively.Against Hudson, junior forward Adam Fravert hit for 20 points, and senior reserve guard Jordan Schlinsog scored 15. The Tigers combined to make 17 of 33 3-pointers and shot 57 percent overall.“We changed our offense a little bit, making four guys out to get a little more driving action and kick it out and shoot,” Boson said. “That really helped us. We’ve been doing a lot of shooting drills lately to get our shots up, and we just shot it a lot better.”Marshfield’s roster boasts seven seniors, six of whom have played significant minutes lately. After entering the playoffs on a four-game losing streak—all of which came by three points or less—it was the seniors that banded together to stay positive.“One of my main goals was keeping the guys focused, keeping them strong with the ball and telling these guys to compete, which is what we wanted to do, compete every night,” Alexander said.“Anything can happen in the playoffs,” Boson added. “Nothing is guaranteed. Our coach got us to believe. We’ve been having some good weeks of practice, and those close games, they were motivators for us.”(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)last_img read more

first_imgDr Christine Steenkamp is hailed asa pioneer in her field.(Image: SAASTA) Stellenbosch University’s Laser ResearchInstitute is renowned for its world-class scientific work.(Image: Stellenbosch University)MEDIA CONTACTS • Dr Christine SteenkampLaser Research Institute+27 21 808 3374 or +27 83 709 6482RELATED ARTICLES• SA scientist lauded for polar work• SA hosts world science meet• SA scientists win AU awards• Unesco fellowship for SA scientisJanine ErasmusLaser physicist Dr Christine Steenkamp is one of three African women scientists, out of a group of 12, who recently received international recognition for excellence in research.Steenkamp and her colleagues, from the Middle East, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as Africa, were honoured at the fourth General Assembly and international conference of the Organisation for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSDW), formerly the Third World Organisation for Women in Science.This year’s OWSDW conference took place in June 2010 under the theme Women Scientists in a Changing World. The conference and General Assembly had a number of joint aims, among them to promote interaction and exchange between women scientists in the South; to boost awareness of OWSDW activities; and to increase assistance from national and international organisations for research projects carried out by women scientists.The awards were presented by funding organisation The Elsevier Foundation, the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World and OWSDW, and are each worth US$5 000 (about R38 000).The 12 laureates are Zeng Fanyi, Ilkay Orhan and Priya Mahadevan from Asia; Uchechi Ekweny, Ndidiamaka Ezejiofor and Christine Steenkamp from Africa; Ghada Abdel-Salam, Lilyan Alsaka and Sakina Adam Ali from the Arab bloc; and Myriam Amezcua-Allieri, Aramis Rivera and Aimé Pelaíz-Barranco from Latin America and the Caribbean.Through a grant made as part of The Elsevier Foundation New Scholar’s programme, three disciplines in each region – biology, chemistry, and mathematics/physics – were recognised. The winners received their prizes from Chinese vice president Xi Jinping at a ceremony in the Great Hall of the People in Tianenmen Square, Beijing.“Encouraging the work of promising scientists in the developing world helps to promote wider participation and excellence in science. This is a key objective of The Elsevier Foundation’s New Scholars programme,” said the foundation’s executive director David Ruth.Submissions were reviewed by the relevant regional OWSDW committee, and shortlisted candidates went under rigorous scrutiny from OWSDW regional vice-presidents as well as the current president Kaiser Jamil, before receiving a grading.“The recognition that this provides will undoubtedly provide an invaluable boost to the promising careers of these young women scientists,” said Jamil.Innovation in physicsSteenkamp took the mathematics/physics prize for Africa for her excellent contribution to science, particularly her pioneering work in the field of vacuum ultraviolet laser spectroscopy. She delivered a lecture at the conference on this highly specialised field of research.Steenkamp obtained her BSc in physics and chemistry from Stellenbosch in 1996 and completed her MSc and PhD in laser physics at the same institution.She is now a senior physics lecturer at her alma mater, and conducts her research at the university’s Laser Research Institute, where the small academic staff complement and postgraduate students carry out fundamental and applied research in laser science and technology, and related applications.She attributes her choice of career to her father, also a physicist, who specialised in wood science. She has worked at the Max Planck Institute in Jena, Germany, and spent time doing research at the University of Colorado in the US – at the personal invitation of distinguished Nobel physics laureate Prof Carl Wieman.Her research interests range from laser cooling and trapping of atoms, to chlorophyll fluorescence and nonlinear optics.Steenkamp’s consistently high-quality output is all the more remarkable, said her OWSDW citation, because when she started her career in experimental physics there was very little research infrastructure available. Since then she herself has developed much of the equipment used in her work, and most of it is still not commercially available.For instance, her design of a vacuum ultraviolet laser source is scientifically important, because the device is not only used to investigate the properties of super-cooled carbon monoxide (CO) molecules, but can also be used to measure spectra of CO isotopomers in a lab – something which has not been possible before.Laser sources that provide light in the vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum are very limited, said Steenkamp in her TWOWS lecture, with only a few in existence worldwide.Isotopomers are isomers – molecules with the same chemical formula, but different structural formula – that contain isotopic atoms. The latter are atoms of the same chemical element but with differing numbers of neutrons – they are found in the same numbers but in different positions on the molecule.CO isotopomers are important because their spectra are implicated in the interpretation of results of interstellar space scans obtained by space stations. The astrophysics community, therefore, is keenly interested in Steenkamp’s innovation. She has published two papers on this work, one in the Astrophysical Journal and the other in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy.This is not Steenkamp’s first award. In 1997 she received the Stellenbosch University Chancellor’s Award, given to the top final year student at the university. In 2003 she was one of three recipients of the Department of Science and Technology’s Women in Science fellowships, and in 2009 she took the Silver Jubilee Medal of the South African Institute of Physics.Steenkamp has also published in well-established peer-reviewd journals, and has presented papers at a number of local and international conferences.last_img read more

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting While doing some research for a work project I’m doing currently, I came acrossthis illuminating PEW report from January 2005, called Internet Evolution: Adecade of adoption: How the internet has woven itself into American life. Thefollowing extract is from the introduction, entitled ‘Internet: The Mainstreaming ofOnline Life’. Here it is, with one comment in italic inserted by me:“The New NormalThe Web has become the “new normal” in the American way of life; those whodon’t go online constitute an ever-shrinking minority. And as the online populationhas grown rapidly, its composition has changed rapidly. At the infant stage, theinternet’s user population was dominated by young, white men who had high incomesand plenty of education [RM: not unlike the make-up of the Web 2.0 Conferenceattendees]. As it passed into its childhood years in 1999 and 2000, thepopulation went mainstream; women reached parity with men online, lots more minorityfamilies joined the party, and more people with modest levels of income and educationcame online.This transition altered the internet’s social environment. These early adoptersloved the liberation they got from being online. They liked the fact that they could getnews from nontraditional sources. Back in 1996, 56% of those who got political newsonline said they preferred the internet because they could get extra information that wasnot available from traditional news sources. At the same time, just 18% said theypreferred the internet because it was convenient. These early adopters wanted to toppleall manner of institutions and establish a new order in virtual space. They had a utopiansense of the transformative power of the new technology.The later adopters are not looking to this technology to overturn the existing order.They like the internet because it can make them more productive and more connected.Theirs is an unsentimental outlook. Like most later adopters of technology, they need tobe shown that there is a real, immediate and practical value in embracing the new.”What do I take from this?1) Web 2.0 is still in the 1996 era in terms of Internet take-up;2) perhaps some of us Web 2.0 pundits have been guilty of focusing too much on “utopian sense of the transformative power of the new technology”; aka the Bubblementality.3) the tipping point will be when Web 2.0 becomes convenient and practical for mainstream people touse – making them “more productive and more connected”. We’re still a year or two awayfrom that point, I think.It’s an excellent report to read and atimely reminder to us all of the context of Web 2.0, within the ongoing evolution of theInternet.center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#web#Web Culture A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

first_imgFor the second year in a row, visitors to Chicago’s Printers Row Lit Fest had the chance to learn about free markets, individual liberty, and limited government. Among the many Baby-Boomer communist booksellers that line the street during the annual weekend festival, AFF’s Chicago leadership team stood proudly, distributing copies of F.A. Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, Leonard Reed’s “I, Pencil,” and Frederic Bastiat’s masterpiece, The Law.In addition to chatting with passersby about current events and the philosophy of freedom, AFF also offered visitors a chance to discover where they landed on the World’s Smallest Political Quiz. After taking ten questions, visitors could be placed in one of five distinct quadrants: libertarian, conservative, liberal, centrist, and statist. Although most landed in the left-liberal quadrant, many were surprised to land in the libertarian area given that they either were unfamiliar with the word or had a misunderstanding of it.AFF-Chicago committee member John Yackley provided an overview of the results at the end of the second day of the festival. AFF color-coded stickers by quiz-takers’ guesstimated ages: red is Millennials (and younger), green is Gen Xers, yellow is Baby Boomers, and blue represents members of the “Greatest Generation” (senior citizens).Watch a video of the results here.You’ll notice most Boomers end up in the left-liberal quadrant, while younger folk tend to be left-liberal to libertarian.AFF gathered nearly 100 email addresses at the festival and gave away dozens of copies of Hayek and Bastiat’s work to interested young people. Many books came courtesy of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, so our thanks go to them for their support.AFF expects to appear again next year at the festival to open more minds to the ideas of freedom.For more information on AFF’s Chicago chapter, join our Facebook page.last_img read more