first_imgThere has been widespread sadness at the death of well-known Letterkenny woman Annette Gallagher (nee Larkin).Annette, who was in her mid 70s, was well-known to customers at The Drum Bar which she helped to run with her husband Cormac.Annette and Cormac took over at the Drum Bar in 1968 but Annette was well-known as an astute businesswoman well before that. She left school at 15 to take over the running of the Larkin family bakery which was also located at Lower main Street.A gentle and kind-hearted woman, Annette however, was never afraid to stand up for what she believed in.One of 13 children to the late Frank and Cis Larkin, Annette was a founding member of the Lower Main Street Traders Association.She was also a found member of the MS Society of Donegal, a condition of which her late sister Yvonne suffered. Her smiling face and friendly manner will be missed behind the counter of the Drum Bar and at Lower Main Street.She is survived by her husband Cormac, son Cormac and daughters Ann-Marie and Mary, son-in-law and two grandchildren.She will be buried following funeral mass tomorrow (THURS) at 10am at St Eunan’s Cathedral.Donegal Daily would like to express its sympathies with the Gallagher and Larkin families.  WIDESPREAD SADNESS AT PASSING OF WELL-KNOWN LETTERKENNY BUSINESSWOMAN was last modified: January 23rd, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Annette GallagherDrum BarLarkinletterkennylast_img read more

first_imgThe N.C. General Assembly has reappointed the first woman elected principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and a Highlands homebuilder to the Western Carolina University Board of Trustees.Joyce Conseen Dugan and John R. Lupoli will serve their second consecutive four-year terms on the WCU board, effective July 1.Dugan retired from the Cherokee Central School System in 2011 after a lengthy career that included stints as a teacher’s assistant, teacher, director of federal programs and superintendent. In 1995, she became the first woman elected principal chief, an office she held for four years. After leaving public office, Dugan began working at Harrah’s Cherokee Casino Resort, becoming the casino’s director of public, government and community relations.Dugan earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from WCU. She received the university Alumni Association’s Professional Achievement Award in 1996 and was placed on the Honor Roll of Peak Performers in the WCU College of Education and Allied Professions.Lupoli is owner and president of Lupoli Construction. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects and the N.C. Small Town Main Street design committee, and former chair of the N.C. Small Town Main Street economic restructuring committee.Lupoli is an active supporter of Highlands Playhouse and The Bascom, a nonprofit center for the visual arts. He was the 2012 recipient of the N.C. Small Town Main Street Award for Design for Highlands’ town square renovation project and a 2011 recipient of a grant from the N.C. Main Street Solutions Fund awarded by the N.C. Department of Commerce.The reappointed trustees and four newly selected board members will be sworn in at the board’s quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 15. The WCU Board of Trustees is composed of 13 members, including eight elected by the UNC Board of Governors, four appointed by the General Assembly, and the university’s Student Government Association president, who serves in an ex-officio capacity.last_img read more

first_img9 April 2013The latest attempt to counter the thriving crime of rhino poaching in South Africa comes in the form of a poisonous substance with which a game reserve is now treating its rhinos’ horns.Consumers of the “poisoned” rhino horn, generally found in Asia, risk becoming seriously ill from ingestion as it is contaminated with a non-lethal chemical package.Private game reserve Sabi Sand Wildtuin, at the southern end of the Kruger Park, is tired of watching an entire species vanish before its eyes.The reserve has resorted to taking matters into its own hands by injecting ectoparasiticides into the horns of 100 of its rhinos.Ectoparasiticides are not intended for consumption by humans; they are generally used for the control of ticks and parasites in animals. An ectoparasiticide is an antiparasitic drug used in the treatment of ectoparasitic infestations. It kills the parasites that live on the body surface.Toxic side-effectsAlthough not lethal in small quantities, they are toxic and symptoms of accidental ingestion may include severe nausea, vomiting and convulsions, among other side effects.Because of these side-effects, the treated rhino and their horns must be visibly identifiable, to avoid ingestion of treated horns by humans.Andrew Parker, the chief executive of Sabi Sand Wildtuin Association, says the reserve is leading this programme because it is located at the epicentre of the problem, at the southern end of South Africa’s Kruger National Park, where up to 70% of rhino killings occur.In addition to making whoever consumes the rhino horn very ill, the ectoparasiticides are accompanied by a pink dye that can be detected by airport scanners.“We realised that the treatment of the horns, along with an indelible dye, would go a long way towards helping us achieve our goal of protecting all rhinos in South Africa from poaching,” says Lorinda Hern of the Rhino Rescue Project.The dye is visible on an X-ray scanner even when ground to a fine powder. Airport security checkpoints are almost certain to pick up the presence of this dye in a treated horn regardless of whether the horn is intact or in powder form.“Testing is ongoing and comprehensive, to ensure that the animals have in no way been harmed by the administration of the treatment and, based on the research, it is believed that the treatment should remain effective for approximately three to four years, after which re-administration would be required,” says Hern.Diminishing the lucrative tradeThere is no doubt a solution to rhino poaching needs to be found. The number of rhinos lost to poaching in South Africa exceeded 300 in 2010 and over 400 in 2011.This week, the government said 203 rhinos had been killed by poachers so far this year, including 145 in Kruger Park.Rhino horn on the black market is worth an estimated R600 000 (US$66 000) a kilo for mature horns, which average four to 4.5kgs in weight when they are sawn or hacked off close to the animal’s skull.The poachers themselves receive a fraction of the R2.4-million to R2.7-million ($264 000 to $300 000) value of each horn from the syndicates that plan the raids and export the material.Logically, a permanent solution to poaching is to eliminate the demand for rhino horn altogether. Education will go a long way to teaching consumers that rhino horn contains no nutritional or medicinal value, however, education will not produce an immediate result – and results are needed urgently.The Sabi Sand game reserve hopes that these two tactics, implemented for the first time in South Africa, will put a dent in the lucrative rhino horn trade.“The media in South Africa and globally maintain a close watch on the shrinking herds of our rhino,” Parker says. “The same platform can expose exactly what the poachers are up against from now on.“They have had an easy ride so far, running a vast and brutal, hugely profitable trade under the noses of government authorities between here and Asia. Now we are forcing them to answer to their consumers about what they are passing off as medicine,” he adds.Sabi Sand has launched a widespread media campaign and posted signs on its fences to make poachers aware that its rhinos’ horns have been poisoned.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

first_imgThe mobile middleware server handles system integration, security, communications, scalability, and cross-platform support.The mobile client application connects to the middleware server and drives both the user interface and the business logic on the device and supports many operating systems and devices.We believe as more HTML5 and library-enabled code modules are developed in our environment, the need for the MEAP might diminish, although we see it as being absorbed, not eliminated.For more information about our efforts, read IT@Intel’s recent white paper, “Delivering Cloud-based Services in a Bring-Your-Own Environment.” Here at Intel, we are actively integrating employee-owned devices—including smartphones, tablets, and PCs—into our enterprise environment. In addition, we now deliver 80 percent of our newly developed business services through our own enterprise private cloud. We plan to increasingly use a mix of private and public cloud-based services, called hybrid cloud, in implementing solutions over the next few years.In my role as IT Chief Technology Officer, I have observed parallels and interdependencies between our adoption of IT consumerization, which provides employees with a wider range of choices for compute capability, and the advent of cloud computing, which offers businesses additional options for IT services. Intel IT is coordinating our cloud computing efforts with our bring-your-own-device (BYOD) initiatives, to enable us to reap maximum business value from both.We feel that both cloud computing and BYOD are important enablers for our agility and enterprise velocity. But historically, application development has been a rigid process that can slow agility, especially in the areas of larger enterprise systems such as ERP. To increase our ability to develop applications and deliver services quickly—and to a wide range of devices—we are implementing a pace-layered approach utilizing a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to help us abstract away our slower-to-evolve applications, such as our ERP system, from our quicker-moving capabilities, such as new supply chains to support new business. By being able to connect existing services faster, it also allows us to implement better capabilities such as transforming our shopping carts into purchase orders.This pace-layered approach matches the pace the platform needs to evolve with the pace the business needs to move by abstracting the front-end functionality away from the back-end systems. For example, a service may rely on data stored in our ERP system, but to deliver the service to a tablet, we need to develop a new user interface (UI). By abstracting the front end from the back end, we can quickly develop the UI without having to disturb the underlying data structures and associated business rules.We have also implemented a Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP), to help us use SOA more efficiently with mobile devices. A MEAP is a comprehensive suite of products and services that can help reduce complexity and connectivity problems associated with deploying an application across multiple devices. In general, a MEAP-based solution consists of two components.last_img read more

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ UEFA have confirmed the seeding for the Euro 2020 draw on November 30, as Italy risk a Group of Death with France and Portugal. Roberto Mancini’s Italy find themselves in Pot 1 after winning all 10 games in Group J, the first time in their history that the Azzurri qualified for a major tournament with a 100% record.  There is a nightmare scenario for Italy, in which they could find themselves in a group containing France and Portugal. Pot 1 Belguim, Italy, England, Germany, Spain, Ukraine Pot 2 France, Poland, Switzerland, Croatia, Netherlands, Russia Pot 3 Portugal, Turkey, Denmark, Austria, Sweden, Czech Republic Pot 4 Wales, Finland, Play-off winner A, Play-off winner B, Play-off winner C, Play-off winner  D Euro 2020 begins in Rome on June 12.last_img read more