first_imgThe sister of €130 million lotto winner Frances Connolly says her wealthy sibling would have loved to buy her late mum a holiday home in Bundoran.Ann Floyd said she hasn’t asked for a penny of her sister’s new-found wealth but is delighted for Frances.Ann, who lives in Spamount on the border between Tyrone and Donegal said her sister may have got her luck from her mum. She revealed “Mummy loved going on holidays to Bundoran in Donegal, and to play the slot machines.“She got a great thrill of seeing is she would win.“I think if she had been here now, Frances would have to get her an apartment down by the sea and keep supplying the coins for Mammy – and she would too, that’s the kind of person Frances is.“Frances is so generous and has always been. If Frances only had a tenner and you said you needed a fiver, she’d give it to you and do without it herself. That’s the kind of woman she is.” Ann and her hubby Patrick say they have made out a list of 50 people whim they will give some money to after their huge windfall last week.Apartment in Bundoran for mother would have been top of lotto winner’s list was last modified: January 11th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:apartmentbundorandonegallottomillionairesTyronelast_img read more

first_imgzoom South Korean shipping company Korea Line Corp., part of SM Group, has decided to withdraw from the race for Hanjin Shipping’s stake in US Port of Long Beach container terminal, the firm revealed in its stock exchange filing.The company withdrew its bid after local media reported it may propose a joint acquisition of the stake in Hanjin’s terminal to Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM).Hanjin’s 54% stake in terminal operator Total Terminals International (TTI), which operates two facilities in Long Beach and Seattle, is estimated to be worth around KRW 400 billion (USD 342.5 million).The remaining 46% stake is held by Swiss-based shipping company Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC).Last month, Korea Line inked a KRW 37 billion (USD 31.4 million) agreement to purchase the Asia-US route network from Hanjin. Scheduled to be finalized on January 5, 2017, the deal includes Hanjin’s business network and client information related to the route and subsidiaries and logistics management systems in seven countries.California’s container terminal also attracted the attention of further two shipping giants as MSC and HMM jointly placed a bid for Hanjin’s stake in the terminal in early December.Following Hanjin’s court receivership filing in late August 2016, the company started selling assets to decrease its debt.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

first_img(The family of Joey Knapaysweet released this photo and a statement Thursday about his recent death. Above he is seen with his mother Micheline Knapaysweet taken just before his death.)The Canadian PressTORONTO – The grieving mother of a young Indigenous man killed by police in northern Ontario spoke out Thursday, saying the family remains in shock and still doesn’t understand why her son died.In a statement from the remote community of Fort Albany, Ont., Micheline Knapaysweet said the family needs answers about the death of her son, Joey Knapaysweet.“What did he do that was so bad that he had to be shot and killed?” Micheline Knapaysweet said. “I am so heartbroken, with so many questions unanswered.”Police in Timmins, Ont., shot 21-year-old Joey Knapaysweet on Feb. 3, in an as-yet unexplained incident that raised racial tensions in the city and sparked anger from the Indigenous community.The province’s police watchdog, the Special Investigations Unit, is looking into the incident and has said officers responded mid-morning to a health-care building and a man fled.“There was an interaction between the man and officers, and one of the officers discharged a firearm,” the unit said in a statement. “The man was struck. He was taken to hospital where he was later pronounced dead.”His death prompted scores of people to attend a vigil – among them Timmins Mayor Steve Black – and denunciation from Indigenous leaders.Joey Knapaysweet was from the James Bay community of Fort Albany – more than an hour’s flight from Timmins. He had gone to Timmins to “seek help in dreams for betterment of his life,” according to his mother’s statement.His mother also released two photographs, including the last one of them together just before he left home.“I cannot sleep at nights, I need answers,” she said. “This is my son, my child.”The family asked for privacy, saying they were not yet ready to speak directly to the media.Black, who urged calm after what he said was a rare shooting, has acknowledged that relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in the city took a hit.Knapaysweet died the same weekend as Agnes Sutherland, an ailing 62-year-old also from Fort Albany, who had been in police custody after an incident at a shelter. The Special Investigations Unit is looking into her death as well.The deaths, along with the acquittal last week of white farmer Gerald Stanley in Saskatchewan in the 2016 killing of a young Cree man, Coulten Boushie, have cast a harsh spotlight in recent weeks on attitudes toward Indigenous people.The Stanley verdict sparked protests across the country along with condemnation from the federal justice minister, with critics calling the justice system biased against Indigenous people.last_img read more