first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — Confidence can breed success, and after the first half of its WIAA playoff opener on March 6 at Chippewa Falls, the Marshfield boys basketball team had plenty of it.The Tigers got hot from the 3-point line early and went on to knock off Chippewa Falls 57-34, scoring their most points in a game in over a month.Marshfield took that momentum into last Saturday’s Division 1 regional final at Hudson, putting up a season-high 67 points in a 67-61 victory to win its second-straight regional championship. The Tigers (8-16) came back from an eight-point deficit in the second half to pull out the win.Marshfield (8-16) will play Superior (20-4) in a WIAA Division 1 sectional semifinal at 7 p.m. Thursday at Eau Claire North High School. The winner will take on either Stevens Point (23-1) or Neenah (20-4) in a sectional final Saturday night at Wausau West High School.“We shot it well, and I thought we defended the heck out of Chippewa Falls,” Marshfield coach Bill Zuiker said. “We went in knowing it would be tough. They had beat us earlier in the year, but they had lost their last game and weren’t really flying high going into the playoffs.“These kids all season, they haven’t quit and haven’t given up on themselves or on me, and they got a payoff out of it. I was so thrilled they could realize some rewards. They worked hard and prepared hard.”Marshfield struggled offensively for much of the season, scoring 50 points or more only twice in its last nine games.The Tigers were able to turn it around in the two playoff wins and embrace an underdog mentality, something that was the complete opposite of last season when Marshfield was a No. 1 seed and expected to make a run to the sectionals.“Coach gets us prepared every night for who we are going to play, and we’re just playing basketball,” senior guard Caleb Alexander said.Marshfield got big games from different players each night.In the semifinal win over Chippewa Falls, Tanner Boson was 5-for-6 and Alexander was 3-for-4 from 3-point range, scoring 22 and 15 points, respectively.Against Hudson, junior forward Adam Fravert hit for 20 points, and senior reserve guard Jordan Schlinsog scored 15. The Tigers combined to make 17 of 33 3-pointers and shot 57 percent overall.“We changed our offense a little bit, making four guys out to get a little more driving action and kick it out and shoot,” Boson said. “That really helped us. We’ve been doing a lot of shooting drills lately to get our shots up, and we just shot it a lot better.”Marshfield’s roster boasts seven seniors, six of whom have played significant minutes lately. After entering the playoffs on a four-game losing streak—all of which came by three points or less—it was the seniors that banded together to stay positive.“One of my main goals was keeping the guys focused, keeping them strong with the ball and telling these guys to compete, which is what we wanted to do, compete every night,” Alexander said.“Anything can happen in the playoffs,” Boson added. “Nothing is guaranteed. Our coach got us to believe. We’ve been having some good weeks of practice, and those close games, they were motivators for us.”(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)last_img read more

first_img18 January 2008South Africans Alex Harris and Sibusiso Vilane made history on Thursday when they became the first South African team to walk unassisted to the South Pole.The duo set out on their epic 65-day journey on 10 November, dragging 130-kilogram sleds almost 1200 kilometres across some of the most hostile terrain on the planet.Antarctica generates much of the bad weather in the southern hemisphere, and storms there can be fierce. Temperatures range from an ambient of about -8 degrees to about -40 degrees Celsius.They completed their journey without the help of support teams putting out food or rigging up tents, and without using wind power or sled dogs, in what Harris described as “the purest form of getting to the South Pole”.Harris and Vilane are no strangers to extreme feats, with Harris becoming the second South African to summit the highest peak on each of the seven continents, the so-called “seven summits”, in 2005 and Vilane becoming the first black South African to climb Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain, in 2003.The two men spent almost a year training for the trek, dragging tyres requiring a pulling force of 30-40kg every second day, covering a distance of about 17 kilometres per training session.The trip was premised on covering at least 20 kilometres a day – they carried only an extra five days’ worth of emergency fuel and food – meaning that any mileage lost in a day would have to be made up for, or they would risk running out of supplies.They just made it, taking exactly five more days than planned – one day more and they’d have been running on empty.The physical and mental toughness it took to achieve this is hinted at in some of the extracts from Harris’s trip journal …No painkillers– extracts from Alex Harris’s journal21 November 2007have only covered distance of 45kms so far, but the last 6 days we have been stuck in our tent with high winds, so it is very frustrating23 November 2007finally on the move again. whiteout today so tough going. broke a ski in the wind the other day. did a repair job, just hope it lasts27 November 2007hi. only managed 14km in 8hrs. weather was perfect but it was the toughest day yet. soft snow made pulling desperate. but we finally made it to 81 degrees!01 December 2007at last. day 18 and did 20.48km in 8.5hrs. felt good, weather perfect and snow improving all the time. 42 more days!02 December 2007another good day. day 19. did 19.4km. my heel is starting to act up. there is a monster bank of clouds rolling in from the east.04 December 2007day 21. i battled today. heel burning like a hot poker. trying different things. sibu is fine11 December 2007day 28. last two days have been desperate conditions. zero vizibility and thick snow. only managed 15km today. heaviest the sleds have felt!13 December 2007this place deprives us of the luxury of nightime but the gloom of the day robs us of the light. instead we move through a grey twilight that knows not dawn nor dusk. it is fit for neither the living nor the dead. battled for 10hrs in the same conditions just for 15km04 January 2008day 52. feel exhausted. did 22.3km but getting colder measured -25.9 in my pocket! done 800km12 January 2008day 60 comes at last. perfect weather. still -22. did 25.4km in 10 hrs. tomorrow its on to emergency rations some juicy tidbits not mentioned before for fear of freaking the folks out. in that very windy spell in the first week, i got frostbite on my inside left thigh, about the size of my hand. not serious though as there is nothing to freeze solid and fall off. unless it was higher up my leg! anyway i have had to doctor it every day and make sure it doesnt go septic. but it is finally healing and forming scabs.14 January 2008day 62. mon 14th. gloomy day but still did 25.4km. countdown! 3 more days. 67km. unbelieveable! JTB #3. In the first week sibu and i had a huge argument about whether it was acceptable to do a #2 in the bell of the tent if conditions outside warranted it! thankfully it never came to that!15 January 2008day 63. JTB #4 We have had no painkillers on this trip. zip! must have fallen out when i was consolidating 2 kits into 1 at home16 January 2008day 64. wow, we have only 15km to go. listen to 702 thurs 4to6. you might catch us. i cant believe this day has finally come!SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Once you have the slider set, you can either view the page or click “get the RSS feed” to add the customized feed to your preferred feed reader. It’s a lot easier than using Yahoo Pipes, that’s for sure!A Couple of SuggestionsOur only complaint about this nifty little web app is that it doesn’t let you choose which section the stories come from (Politics, Technology, Science, Gaming, etc.). Instead, it looks at the entire Digg website. We would also love to filter for images and videos, too. Perhaps in some future version, we hope? At any rate, this is one of those little tools that can end up making your life a little less info-overloaded. And for that, we thank you, Mr. Alex Rabarts. (P.S. Can you build a generic version of this that lets you enter in any URL and then filter by PostRank? That would be amazing!)Alex also created a nice visualization of Digg, Reddit, Delicious, Hacker News, and Yahoo Buzz that’s worth a look. Check it out at oursignal.com. Related Posts If you like to follow the hottest news at Digg.com and use the Digg RSS feed to do so, you’ve probably been a little overwhelmed by the number of stories it pumps out. Now there’s a simple web app that lets you customize the Digg RSS feed by the minimum number of diggs a story has received. You can then view the stories on the disstill web site or you can subscribe to your new, filtered feed. Sometimes it’s little things like this that really make our day. It’s So Easy!There’s really not much to the disstill web application, but that’s okay with us. This is definitely an example of how the simplest web apps can be the most useful in the end. The only thing on the disstill web page is a little slider bar that lets you filter Digg.com stories based on a minimum number of diggs. You just drag the slider to adjust the number of diggs that stories need to have in order to be included in the RSS feed. The low end of the slider is set to 100 diggs and the high end is 5000. Obviously, the higher you go, the more filtered the feed becomes and the more likely you’re only going to see the really, really hot stories. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Product Reviews#RSS & Feeds#RSS Readers#web sarah perez A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

first_imgCustomers. Do you know who your customer is? I do. I know my target market and can define my customer. I’m not marketing to everyone. Who are the companies you are marketing to, the people who will be most receptive to your messages, and how will you serve them? What are their ages, desires, needs and pain points?All this data will help you create an impressive resume. But they’re also the statistics you should know today, whether you’re walking into a meeting or sitting down with your boss to evaluate your progress or justify a budget increase.Before you use this data to polish up your resume, think about how you can put that data to work every day on the job.3 tools to organize your data for success1. A monster dashboardIf you aren’t an Excel expert, become one. My master spreadsheet has 40 different tabs in it. Get to know your dashboard reporting tool, whether you use Salesforce or a CRM or an e-commerce tool. Be the expert in pulling the essential data. Carry that data into your meetings and update it regularly.The dashboard will help you focus on what’s important and what you need to know. Talk to other people in your organization if you need to fill in blanks.2. DIY metricsYour dashboard should show your organization’s KPIs, such as the percentage of leads converted to purchase, but you also need your own set of metrics that show your email success on your own terms.Statistics like time to purchase, subscriber/customer lifetime or percentage of quality leads might not be important to your executives, but you need them to be a good marketer.If your dashboard doesn’t give you those metrics, then create your own.That’s what I ended up doing earlier in my career because I wasn’t getting the numbers I needed to show how my programs were succeeding. I ended up with 15 pages of numbers that tracked different pieces of the business. I took them into every meeting and was able to rattle them off from memory because I knew the numbers intimately.3. StorytellingThe best job candidates I interviewed told compelling stories. If you want to advocate more effectively for your email program, you will know your story inside and out and tell it in ways that your audience will understand.Knowing your story will help you clarify what you send prospects, subscribers and customers. You also must know how to tailor your story for different audiences. This is crucial if you’re introducing your brand to a new audience, as I did when I brought a UK brand into the US market.Note: Update your story daily. Telling the same story over and over makes it go stale. Update it regularly with fresh data. It might take you 25 minutes to write your story but four days to tweak it.The power of knowing your numbers is important, especially in larger organizations. I learned this the day my boss asked me for some numbers that I didn’t have at my fingertips. He said something I never forgot:“If you don’t know these numbers, who does? Because that’s who I want to talk to.”Wrapping upAs an email marketer, you are your own CEO, CFO, COO and front-line person. Act like it. Know your data and use it to create a compelling story. Craft a version of it so that you have an answer the next time someone says, “How’s our email program doing?”The post The business stats you must have on instant recall appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: The business stats you must have on instant recall After re-entering the job market recently, updating my resume was one of the first things I did. I am a numbers guy, so I started thinking about the metrics that would best highlight my accomplishments.Which KPIs would impress my industry and the top decision-makers in it? What statistics did I use every day on the job?See, I wasn’t just a pretty face on the speaker’s platform at marketing conferences. I headed up US marketing operations for a UK-based email service provider. I carried metrics like these, and many more, into team and client meetings and executive sessions and used them to build out my marketing plans.Then, as I compiled my stats, I had an epiphany.I realized that these big-picture stats aren’t just for your resume. These are the numbers you should be carrying around in your head every day on the job. They’re the stats that help you demonstrate the value and effectiveness of your email program.If someone — like your CEO — were to stop you in the hall and ask, “How’s our email program really doing?” would you have a ready answer? Or would you stumble over a vague statement about open rates and opt-ins?Everyday statistics to carry around in your headThese stats serve me well, both on the job and when I’m summing up my career highlights to date:Testing. In my previous job, we did a lot of cool things to inform our account-based management using test data to inform the ads we showed our prospects so that we could better drive them to our web pages to capture their information. Engagement. What drives engagement? I know which subject lines got the most opens and which emails drove the most clicks. Email success is about more than opens and a good marketer knows what persuades people to open and engage. Best and worst campaigns. You know your victories, but talk about your flops, too. Everybody has them. Show what you learned from your failure and how you avoided repeating it. For me, it was a $10,000 campaign with a new ad tech company. It failed miserably, but I stopped the campaign before I spent all the company’s money. Posted on 4th August 2018Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share The business stats you must have on instant recallYou are here: KPIs. When I’m on the job, our net sales and opportunity value are constantly in my head. Things like open rates, click rates, conversion rates, number of segments and average order value. What were my goals and what percentage of them did I accomplish? Retention. How did I retain those prospects, customers or subscribers? What are my retention rates quarterly or over a year? What’s the average retention or burnout in the same period? When did I know it was time to stop marketing to a prospect? HomeDigital MarketingThe business stats you must have on instant recall Acquisition. As a B2B marketer, I need to show how many high-quality leads and customers I acquired. For B2C marketers, how many subscribers or customers did you acquire each month? How many converted to purchase in the first 15 or 30 days? What are your lows, highs and averages? Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019last_img read more