first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored APB, the Dutch pension fund for government and education employees, announced it would divest 300,000 euros from Posco Daewoo over deforestation in Indonesian Papua.Norway’s pension fund divested from Posco Daewoo, and its parent company, Posco, in 2015. APB is still invested in Posco.Posco Daewoo is owned by one of South Korean’s largest conglomerates. Dutch national pension fund APB is divesting 300,000 euros ($351,000) from Korean firm Posco Daewoo over deforestation in Indonesia’s easternmost Papua province.The announcement by ABP follows a series of media reports in the Netherlands about forest destruction by PT Bio Inti Agrindo, an oil palm plantation company owned by Posco Daewoo. In May, consumer television program Kassa — the name means “cash register” in Dutch — aired a 16-minute segment on the pension fund’s investment in Posco Daewoo. That same month, the Dutch website Oneworld.nl published its own exposé of the land clearing in Papua.Environmental groups have campaigned against the deforestation in Papua by Posco Daewoo, and by other companies, for years. The palm oil industry is rapidly expanding there.In 2015, Norway’s pension fund divested from Posco Daewoo —then named Daewoo International — and from Posco, the parent company. APB still has a 157 million euro ($183 million) investment in Posco. “Norway got it right — Posco’s massive deforestation and land grabbing isn’t something to play games with,” Rolf Schipper, forest campaigner at Milieudefensie, a Dutch group, said in a statement. “If ABP wants to be seen as a responsible trustee of Dutch resources, they have to stop financing rogue actors like Posco, period.”The land PT Bio Inti Agrindo has been licensed to develop by the Indonesian government overlaps with a WWF Global Ecoregion home to 344 registered bird and 69 mammal species, some of which are endangered and endemic to the area. PT Bio Inti Agrindo has cleared more than 200 square kilometers (77 square miles) of forest in Papua since 2013, according to a report released by think tank the World Resources Institute in March.Banner: The stocky, flightless northern cassowary (Casuarius unappendiculatus) is one of the birds-of-paradise for which Papua is famous. Image by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.center_img Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

first_imgThe Daily Observer investigation has established that several students, most of them who live across rivers from schools in Bong and Margibi counties did not sit for the just ended 2016 exams administered by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC).The affected students are from the Pentecostal Conqueror Academy (PCA) along Bong Mines Road in Kakata, School of Christ International (SOCI) in Weala and the Frelela Public School (FPS) in Frelela Town, Bong County.The number of students, who missed the exam are said to be about 35 including female and male students.WAEC Monrovia office confirmed the report but attributed the missed exams to what it described as “unforeseen circumstances” that prevented the students from turning up.WAEC Head of Test Administration, Dele G. Gbotoe, via mobile phone, told the Daily Observer that some of the students who did not take the test had arrived at a creek that had overflowed its banks causing the students “considerable delay in arriving at the testing centers.”Nevertheless, Daily Observer Bong County correspondent reported that the students affected from Margibi County were not registered by their respective administrations during the WAEC registration period, while a few students from the FPS allegedly dropped out of school after registering for the exams, which were administered in June instead of May this year.The Principal of the Pentecostal Conqueror Academy, Stephen S. K. Momo on Thursday, July 6 confirmed the information, but said there were only seven students that registered for WAEC from his institution.He said despite several announcements or reminders made to both students and parents about WAEC fees, some of them did not register. Mr. Momo noted that at the beginning of the school year, about 15 ninth graders enrolled, but a few dropped and the number reduced to 12, adding that out of the twelve, five did not write the exams.He said those students who missed the WAEC will not pass to the next class, “because the Ministry of Education (MOE) issued a very strict mandate to school authorities not to promote students from the ninth and 12th grades who did not write or who failed the WAEC exams.”The coordinator for the School of Christ International, George S. Tengbeh, confirmed the situation and attributed it to parents’ failure to register their children in the stipulated time set by WAEC, which elapsed before many parents paid the registration fees.Exams administered by the WAEC for both 9th and 12 graders are annual academic exercises to evaluate students’ preparedness for graduation or promotion to secondary level.This year’s administration of the exams suffered a series of constraints beginning with the cancellation of the previous exams due to what the administration claimed was “an unexpected theft of copies of each of the nine exam subjects from the Konola SDA Mission.” The MOE stated that it could not justify administering exams that had been leaked.Although the date on the exam papers administered remains the same as the copies of the exams purportedly leaked, WAEC Monrovia office went ahead and administered the exams June 27 to July 1 to more than 46, 000 registered 12th graders.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgYoann Gourcuff is ready to snub interest from Everton and Watford to sign for Rennes.The midfielder is currently a free agent after his contract with Lyon expired at the end of last season.The Frenchman, who was once a target of Arsenal and Tottenham, has received several offers this summer.Both Everton and Watford are believed to have expressed an interest, while clubs in Spain also met with the player’s agent.However, according to reports in France, Gourcuff is now ready to reject those proposals in favour of a move to Rennes.The 29-year-old is said to prefer a move to France and that was the reported thinking behind his decision. Yoann Gourcuff 1last_img read more

first_imgHazard has been hugely successful since he moved to Chelsea from Lille in 2012, helping the Blues to two Premier League titles in six-and-a-half seasons with the club.This season he has continued to impress – with ten goals and ten assists in 22 matches. Hazard, 28, has been linked to LaLiga giants Real Madrid over the past several transfer windows, and he has himself has flirted with rumours of a potential move to the Spanish capital.Sarri has recently made it clear that youngster Callum Hudson-Odoi will remain at the club in this window and quite possibly the next. Getty Images – Getty Gossip But he claimed Hazard has the right to decide his own future and has given him the green light to leave Stamford Bridge should he want to.Speaking to the media ahead of Chelsea’s trip to Bournemouth, Sarri said: “Eden is 28. If he wants to go, I think he has to go.“Of course, I hope the opposite, I hope he wants to stay here.“He has the potential to be the best player in Europe at the moment.” GRATITUDE Sarri reveals what his bosses have told him about Hudson-Odoi’s future STAYING PUT Ten stars who could leave the Premier League on deadline day On the move WHO’S NEXT Chelsea transfer latest: Blues chasing Premier League ace, Depay, plus more Eden Hazard can leave Chelsea if he wants to, Maurizio Sarri has claimed.The Blues boss wants his star player to remain at Stamford Bridge but has insisted it is only right to let him leave if he desires a move away.center_img Sarri has said Hazard can go if he wants danny boy January transfer deadline day: The 15 deals that could get done 2 Christian Pulisic: How Chelsea might line-up next season with incoming star REVEALED 2 LATEST CHELSEA NEWS Hazard has been linked with Real Madrid consistently in recent years West Ham target Chelsea midfielder in late January deal Hudson-Odoi told to ‘respect’ Chelsea after Bayern Munich move is blocked last_img read more

first_imgThis week’s warm and sunny weather forecast in most parts of the state likely has many digging out their garden gloves and playing in the dirt. But before you head to a big-box store to purchase your seeds and plants, the state’s land conservancies and family farms hope you’ll consider heirloom varieties.Nancy Long and her husband, Harold, of Long Family Farms and Gallery, exclusively plant vegetables on their farm in Cherokee County that was passed down from the Eastern Band of Cherokee.“There’s the ability to share with others by sharing the seeds and the stories and the memories,” she says. “Like, it might be, ‘Oh, these were grandpa’s butter beans or grandma’s favorite tomato.’ All these seeds have so many different stories and the memories that go along with it.”Harold Long, a member of the Cherokee, recently traveled to Oklahoma to retrieve Cherokee tan pumpkin seeds, once thought lost but found on a farm there. They’ve since shared the seeds through an outreach program. The Mainspring Conservation Trust has conservation easements on four farms in Cherokee and Clay counties to help preserve farms such as the Longs’.Land conservancies are able to preserve farmland through the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service Farm Bill, currently up for renewal in Congress.Sara Posey is the Hiwassee Programs Manager for the Mainspring Conservation Trust and says beyond the importance of preserving horticulture history, maintaining a variety helps protect the food supply.“When we’re in a monoculture, we are susceptible to insect blights, and if we only have one strain of a plant, then it’s gone and that’s the resurgence with heirloom,” she explains. “They are all genetically different.”Long says people who have heirloom plants and vegetables on their own land can help secure the long-term history of varieties for generations to come.“If more people would take an interest and have seed exchanges, more of the seeds would be able to get into other people’s hands, so really in order to save a seed, you have to share them,” Long adds.Recently, the University of North Carolina-Asheville hosted a seed exchange. The Carolina Farm Stewardship Association has a similar program.last_img read more

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Once you have the slider set, you can either view the page or click “get the RSS feed” to add the customized feed to your preferred feed reader. It’s a lot easier than using Yahoo Pipes, that’s for sure!A Couple of SuggestionsOur only complaint about this nifty little web app is that it doesn’t let you choose which section the stories come from (Politics, Technology, Science, Gaming, etc.). Instead, it looks at the entire Digg website. We would also love to filter for images and videos, too. Perhaps in some future version, we hope? At any rate, this is one of those little tools that can end up making your life a little less info-overloaded. And for that, we thank you, Mr. Alex Rabarts. (P.S. Can you build a generic version of this that lets you enter in any URL and then filter by PostRank? That would be amazing!)Alex also created a nice visualization of Digg, Reddit, Delicious, Hacker News, and Yahoo Buzz that’s worth a look. Check it out at oursignal.com. Related Posts If you like to follow the hottest news at Digg.com and use the Digg RSS feed to do so, you’ve probably been a little overwhelmed by the number of stories it pumps out. Now there’s a simple web app that lets you customize the Digg RSS feed by the minimum number of diggs a story has received. You can then view the stories on the disstill web site or you can subscribe to your new, filtered feed. Sometimes it’s little things like this that really make our day. It’s So Easy!There’s really not much to the disstill web application, but that’s okay with us. This is definitely an example of how the simplest web apps can be the most useful in the end. The only thing on the disstill web page is a little slider bar that lets you filter Digg.com stories based on a minimum number of diggs. You just drag the slider to adjust the number of diggs that stories need to have in order to be included in the RSS feed. The low end of the slider is set to 100 diggs and the high end is 5000. Obviously, the higher you go, the more filtered the feed becomes and the more likely you’re only going to see the really, really hot stories. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Product Reviews#RSS & Feeds#RSS Readers#web sarah perez A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

first_imgChris Darimont discusses the impact of humans’ unique predatory behavior on the planet, and Catherine Matacic talks with Sarah Crespi about whistled languages, Neolithic massacres, and too many gas giants. Hosted by Sarah Crespi.last_img

first_img By Jeffrey MervisMay. 8, 2018 , 9:00 AM Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidatesPHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA—Before Chrissy Houlahan decided to run for Congress in southeastern Pennsylvania, she made a list of things she felt anyone serving in that body needed to understand. At the top were how to protect the country, how to grow the economy, and how to educate the nation’s children.Houlahan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and a master’s degree in technology policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, realized she was well-suited to tackle all three questions with her experience as a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, an executive with two successful startup companies, and a chemistry teacher in an urban high school. But before throwing her hat into the ring, Houlahan applied one more lesson from her time in the classroom, on the job, and in the military: She gamed out a way to win the election.Some 15 months later, Houlahan has implemented that plan to perfection. Thanks in part to a near-flawless campaign and prodigious fundraising, she is now the only Democrat on the 15 May primary ballot for Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district (PA-6), an area southwest of here. Because of some good fortune, she’s also a heavy favorite to win the general election in November for what is now an open seat.The 50-year-old Houlahan says she isn’t afraid of competition. “But it’s very draining if there are lots of us [Democrats] fighting among ourselves” in the primary election, she notes. And although she says her ultimate goal is to turn the district “from a red dot to a blue dot,” it’s no secret that she wants to be that blue dot.“Our system is in desperate straits, and you can either run away and hide or try to be part of the solution,” she says. When asked why she chose Congress for her first foray into politics, rather than a local post, she doesn’t mince words. “I don’t have time for that. The stakes are too high, and I think I’m qualified.” How a Pennsylvania industrial engineer became the odds-on favorite to win a seat in Congress Public health scientist hopes to take his activism to Congress Pennsylvania is a key battleground in the fight for control of the next Congress, and scientists are in the middle of that fight. In February, the state’s highest court threw out a Republican-drawn map of the state’s 18 congressional districts and installed one that, for the most part, eliminates partisan gerrymandering. Those new districts helped push some Republican incumbents into retirement, while at the same time prompting many first-time Democratic candidates to run for seats that now appear winnable.The result is a political free-for-all in which veteran campaign watchers are hedging their bets on who the winners might be. “I haven’t seen a single poll, and without a poll, you can’t begin to make a guess,” says political scientist Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall College (F&M) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center for Politics and Public Affairs and runs the F&M Poll. A crowded field, he says, simply adds to the confusion. This story is the second in a three-part series on candidates with considerable scientific training who are running as Democrats for the U.S. House of Representatives in Pennsylvania. Their first test is the 15 May primary.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Chrissy Houlahan makes her pitch to voters in Pennsylvania’s sixth congressional district. Kelly Schulz center_img The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates Postdoc hopes Pennsylvania voters will help her re-engineer how to run for Congress The science vote No more flying soloAsk Houlahan about her childhood, and her answer—“I grew up everywhere”—reflects her military upbringing. Houlahan’s father and one of her grandfathers were U.S. Navy pilots, and her dad’s job flying P-3 Orion antisubmarine reconnaissance planes meant the family would always be along the water. By the time she was a teenager, Houlahan was a certified scuba diver, an open-water swimmer, and a budding marine biologist. Her easy access to both oceans and sky, combined with a strong parental push to study science, led her to put astronaut at the top of her career choices.In her mind, the process began by becoming a pilot. She won an Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship to attend Stanford. However, the military was not welcome on campus when she arrived there in 1985. So every Friday, Houlahan was one of 20 Stanford undergraduates who would pile into cars and drive 40 kilometers to San Jose State University for daylong training.Hostility to the military wasn’t the only obstacle she had to overcome. Engineering classes were typically offered Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—and Houlahan said Stanford made no attempt to accommodate the ROTC students who would be absent. “So ROTC meant you were basically missing one-third of your classes, for 4 years,” she recalls. “And that made it pretty hard to be a very good student.”The size of the ROTC class would eventually dwindle to four, with Houlahan as the only woman. And although her military heritage helped her persevere—“I knew exactly what I was setting myself up for,” she says—she made an unorthodox decision when the Air Force offered her one of its highly competitive slots for pilot training.“I turned them down,” she says. “I had already started dating my husband and was hoping that we would end up making a life together. I had grown up in a wandering lifestyle in which we moved every year. He wasn’t going into the military, and I visualized what his life would be like if I were in the military.”Her classmates and Air Force officials couldn’t believe it, she recalls. “I remember the Air Force was pretty disappointed, and my ROTC cadre was stunned. But it was a lifestyle choice. And we’ve been married for 28 years, so I think I made the right one.”After graduation, Houlahan spent 3 years at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts, which focuses on electronic communications systems. There she worked on air and space defense technologies “one or more generations in the future.” The challenges included figuring out “what types of information people need, and in what order, and with what visual displays, when ballistic missiles are raining down on you” and “how to communicate in a postnuclear war environment.”Corner office to the classroomAfter leaving the military, she made use of her MIT degree, which combined business and engineering courses, to help her husband run a fledgling sports apparel company, AND1. The startup, based here, soon grew to rival industry leader Nike. Its socially responsible benefits included 40 hours of paid community service annually for every employee, which Houlahan invariably used to improve educational opportunities for underserved populations. “And for me,” she says, “that meant women and girls in STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] and communities of color.”Eventually, she decided that she needed to experience the problems facing the nation’s public schools before she could hope to have any impact. So she left an executive position at another startup her husband had co-founded and enrolled in a program for lifelong learners at the University of Pennsylvania, retaking chemistry and taking biology for the first time. She also was accepted into Teach for America, an on-the-job training program that placed her at Simon Gratz High School, a storied but troubled school here.For someone used to working in a corner office, Simon Gratz was an eye-opening experience. “We had some labs, but we didn’t have access to them for most of the year,” she says. A bigger problem, she soon realized, was that “teaching science to kids who are reading really, really below grade level is an impossibility. And my kids were reading at the third or fourth grade level.”Although Teach for America fellows, who are often fresh out of college, must stay in the classroom for 2 years to earn their teaching degree, Houlahan left the program after 1 year. She had learned enough, she says, to understand the importance of literacy in tackling many of the problems facing urban schools. She then joined Springboard Collaborative, a nonprofit based here that aims to improve literacy by creating a year-round learning environment for students that extends into the home and community.A wall of moneyHoulahan says that she and her husband have emphasized to their three children, now adults, the importance of putting their talents to the “highest, best use.” After Donald Trump was elected president, she says, she applied that imperative to herself.“I was raised to respect the democratic process, and the will of the people, and whoever is your commander in chief,” she says. “And this was the first time that I felt I couldn’t do that.”Anticipating that her response to that dilemma might lead her into electoral politics, Houlahan spent the next 3 months exploring what it would take to run a campaign. One day, she appended a note to a fundraising solicitation from Emily’s List, a nonprofit that supports women running for office and to which she regularly donated small amounts. “I want to run for Congress,” she wrote. “What does it take?”Once she made up her mind, Houlahan hit the ground running. She wanted to learn as much as possible about the district. She also wanted to raise enough money to scare off any challengers.“I wanted to put up as big a defense as I could,” she says, “because it doesn’t do anybody any good to fight among ourselves.” Her strategy has been wildly successful: As of 31 March, Houlahan had raised $2 million, a staggering haul for a political novice in the run-up to a primary.Raising vast amounts is “a necessary evil” for first-time candidates like herself who need to introduce themselves to potential voters, she says. “But it’s also a big part of what’s broken in campaigning.” If voters send her to Washington, D.C., she promises to seek ways “to lessen the role of money and increase transparency in campaigning.”Houlahan has also benefited from forces beyond her control. The two-term incumbent Republican who holds the seat, Representative Ryan Costello, dropped out of the race a week after the 20 March filing deadline. That leaves Greg McCauley, a tax lawyer and neophyte candidate, as the only eligible Republican.In another stroke of good luck for Houlahan, the district in which she is running has become decidedly more Democratic since she declared her candidacy. In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out a map apportioning all 18 congressional seats that was created by the state’s Republican-led legislature. The old PA-6 was nearly evenly split between those who voted for Trump and those who supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential race. But Democrats enjoy a 10-point advantage in the newly redrawn district. As a result, political handicappers have shifted the seat from a toss-up to likely Democrat.If Houlahan wins, she will be looking for opportunities to promote her ideas on national security, the economy, and education. She says she’s “pro-business” but progressive on social issues. She’d also like to explore ways to shorten the campaign season—and lessen the incessant need to raise money.“I have been campaigning for 18 months for a job that, if I win, I will hold for 2 years,” she says wearily. “And as near as I can tell, I’ll start fundraising to get re-elected the day after I’m sworn in.”Even so, Houlahan is looking forward to meeting some kindred spirits in Washington, D.C. “I’m hopeful that, if I get elected, there will be a lot of people like me who want to be part of a wave of change. And if there are enough of us, maybe we’ll have the opportunity to make a difference.”*Correction, 9 May, 10:53 p.m.: This story has been updated to correct Houlahan’s age.last_img read more

first_imgThe zombie career experience nightmare: zombie employees turning into zombie candidates returning to be zombie employees.Brand Talent is about saving you from becoming a zombie. But how do you know if you  have already turned into one?You get up every morning dreading work. You feel like the walking dead.Then you lose that job you hate so much. You are mad, but you get over it once you realize that you don’t have a lot of cash in the bank. You hustle to get your resume together. You start reaching out to your network, cursing yourself for letting so many friendships lapse as you kept your head down and turned the crank in your old job.You score a few interviews for jobs that you don’t want, but you need the money so you fake your best sales face. You are a zombie candidate stalking your next employer.Finally, an offer comes through. A voice in the back of your head says “NOT AGAIN!” but  that voice is drowned in the gratitude of not having your car repossessed. One week into the new job you realize you are going to hate this job as much as you hated the last one. The zombie cycle repeats itself.You don’t want the solution to today’s problem to turn into just another nightmare. You are better than that.Being a zombie puts you in the career crosshairs. Zombies simply can’t compete against people with passion. Anything a zombie can do can be done by a hungry worker in a low cost location. You can’t outsource people who create value, but you can’t create value if you hate your work.If you want recruiters calling you (instead of the other way around), if you want to be brand talent, you need to make your first priority figuring out how to get paid as much as possible for doing something you love. You need to profit from your purpose.I ask every person I interview the following question: “What would you do it you won the lottery?” Some people light up and tell me stories about their dreams. I have seen it happen hundreds of times, and it is always the best part of my day. You can see the real person peeking out from behind the zombie mask. I can’t help myself: I want that person to experience their dream.Of course that doesn’t always mean I have the right job for them. But I never forget them. Whether they know it or not, their sincere passion has created a brand with me.  Their unique, individual brand. They have started on the path to being Brand Talent.last_img read more

first_imgDiminutive Delhi wicketkeeper Rishabh Pant slammed a brilliant triple hundred but it went in vain as Maharashtra took the all-important first innings lead in the Ranji Trophy Group B match that ended in a draw on Sunday.Pant compiled 308 off only 326 balls laced with as many as 9 sixes and 42 fours and brought Delhi very close to Maharashtra’s huge first innings score of 635/2 declared.However, he fell in trying to hit a 10th six, one ball after he had lofted left-arm spinner Satyajeet Bachhav over the rope, when Delhi were 58 runs behind Maharashtra’s first innings total.The dismissal of Pant, who had kept wickets over the first two days and then came down to bat at No.5 when Delhi were 135/3, ended his team’s hopes as Maharashtra polished off the remaining three wickets for 13 runs to terminate the northern team’s first innings at 590 for a lead of 45.In the remaining time, Maharashtra made 58 without loss before the game was called off by mutual consent.BENGAL BAG THREE POINTSAbhimanyu Easwaran scored his second century of the match as Bengal logged home three points against Uttar Pradesh by virtue of their first innings lead in a drawn Ranji Trophy group league encounter.After securing a vital 56-run first innings lead, Bengal employed a safety-first approach declaring at 274/6 in 76 overs leaving UP with an improbable target of 331.The two captains shook hands when UP scored 70 for no loss in 20 overs. UP got a point from the game.Just like the first day, the final day also belonged to the right-handed opener Easwaran carried his bat through the innings with an unbeaten 110 following his 142 in the first innings.advertisementThis was his third first-class hundred and batted for a period of more than five and quarter hours, facing 209 balls. There were 11 boundaries in his innings.YUVRAJ, BOWLERS GIVE PUNJAB SIX POINTSIn-form skipper Yuvraj Singh’s timely declaration paid off as his bowlers fired in unison to help Punjab bundle out Madhya Pradesh for 180 and notch up a 126-run win in their Group A Ranji Trophy match.Chasing 307 runs for an outright victory, Madhya Pradesh were bowled out in 64.4 overs at the CH Bansi Lal Cricket Stadium.Pacer Manprit Gony was the wrecker-in-chief for Punjab, returning figures of 4/41, while Siddarth Kaul (3/42) and Sandeep Sharma (2/25) provided the much-needed support at the other end.Punjab will pick six points for the outright win.last_img read more