first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The Alaska Highway Flyers Flight #180 will be hosting their annual COPA for Kids Day on June 16th.The COPA For Kids aviation program provides Canadian youth with an introduction to the world of general aviation. To date, the COPA for Kids program has introduced over 23,000 young Canadians to flying aircraft.Participants of COPA for Kids Day will get a chance to examine a working aircraft, close up on the ground. They’ll also attend a 20 minute Ground School conducted by a pilot, explaining what the various parts of an aircraft are, and what they do. After that, participants will join a walk-around inspection, showing how pilots prepare for a safe flight. Finally, they’ll get to take to the skies for a short flight. Aviators will observe all of the facets of flight: from start-up to take-off, landing, and shut-down.- Advertisement -Flights run between 15 and 45 minutes depending on weather and the number and age of participants. All of the pilots and aircraft involved are licensed and registered by Transport Canada.Organizers say that this year’s event is completely full, but would-be fliers need not despair. Those who continue to register will get the first chance to register at the next event hosted by COPA Flight 180.Parents and guardians must read and complete the waiver and registration forms at http://www.copaforkids.org/content/index.cfm?page=Parents. Please email forms to stevehorychun@gmail.com to register. Participants get to fly on a first-come, first-served basis.Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgThat Jack McClellan apparently couldn’t stay away from children even when he was under court order shows just what a danger he is. His presence is a threat to all the state’s kids – which is why the expansive court order against him, although onerous, seems appropriate. If Jack wants to get away from California’s kids, he ought to go to an old-age home. Or better yet, he could just leave the state.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Not only that, he was carrying a camera – a troubling sign given his location and his penchant for posting pictures of girls to a Web site he used to run for fellow pedophiles. McClellan swears this was all innocent: He went to UCLA because he thought there wouldn’t be kids on a college campus. Dumb luck, he says, ended him up outside a children’s center. Right, Jack. How do you explain the camera? More likely is that McClellan chose this site precisely because, being on a college campus, he could claim he didn’t mean to be stalking kids. Or maybe he went to the campus, but found himself unable to resist his disordered predilections. Whatever the case, there can be little doubt that someone with McClellan’s history would accidentally stumble upon a gaggle of children. And parents and law enforcement can’t afford to extend him the benefit of the doubt. WHEN a judge slapped an ultra-restrictive restraining order on admitted pedophile Jack McClellan, some questioned whether the legal system had gone too far. But on Monday, McClellan proved that he got exactly what he deserved. Under the terms of the injunction, McClellan was barred from coming within 30 feet of any minor in California. In a state with millions of children, that seemed like an impossible order to obey – raising questions about the order’s constitutionality. But on Monday, despite promising that his days of stalking little girls were over, McClellan showed up outside UCLA’s Infant Development Program in Franz Hall. last_img read more

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los Angeles Officers spotted the van near Firestone and Norwalk Boulevards in Downey, and pulled it over. The van stopped, but when an officer approached, it drove off. Seconds later, the van stopped and two suspects ran from the car. Police recovered the ATM safe from the van, but could not find the suspects. Anyone with information about this crime or the suspects should call Whittier Police Department at (562) 945-8255. 165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – Two men ripped an ATM machine from the wall at a department store with a van Tuesday morning. A passer-by saw an unusual blue van blocking the doors at Walgreens store at 11604 Whittier Blvd., and called police at about 3 a.m. “Between the time the person called, and the time we got there, the van had left,” said Whittier police spokesman Jason Zuhlke. “We think they used the tow hitch on their van and tied a rope or chain to the ATM.” The burglars gutted the cash machine’s safe, and left the ATM lying in the store’s parking lot, Zuhlke said.last_img read more

first_imgThe expanded Washington County Detention Center is about ready to house inmates and the public will get its first view this Saturday at a special open house.The addition increases the number of beds to 204 and includes a new kitchen and laundry areaSheriff Claude Combs took my on a tour through the new addition of the Washington County Jail in May 2014 along with Chief Deputy Sheriff Roger Newlon.Looking into a cell block area where prisoners will be housed in cells manufactured in Georgia and trucked to Salem and installed.This view of another Cell Block shows an area for prisoners to congregate outside of their cells on the lower level.Sheriff Claude Combs stands in the command center were jail personnel can view all cell blocks at one time. A state-of-the-art surveillance system has been installed.According to Commissioner Dave Brown, the public can attend this open house from 11a to 6p.“We’re getting ready to put a small batch of inmates in next week just to test out the systems,” said Brown. “We want the public to see what it looks like and how this project has progressed.” To date, just over $9 million has been spent on the jail project. That’s less than the maximum $12 million the county may spend without a referendum.And good news for Superior Court Judge Frank Newkirk – there is about $1.5 million left over from the jail that could help expand the tight quarters of the courtroom.Individual cells are located around the perimeter of the new jail with a command center in the middle — an elevated room, from which jail personnel can see every pod and every cell. Security cameras, some 58 of them, will assist jail personnel with keeping an eye on the prison population. The control center will be staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week.“You won’t move anywhere in here where you won’t be watched,” Sheriff Claude Combs told me during a tour back in August.The pre-fabricated cells, complete with built in fixtures such as beds, were made at a plant in Georgia and trucked to the site. There are two-, four- and eight-person cells, grouped in clusters or pods.Each pod has a common area.The cells are made of steel, similar to what is used on battleships.One cell in each block is handicapped accessible.A maintenance corridor runs behind the cells; workers can access plumbing and electrical systems without actually entering the cell.The addition is equipped with a backup generator in the event of a power outage; a battery provides power for the few minutes it takes for the generator to kick in.There is a state of the art security system, only one door in the new facility can be opened at a time.Combs said some employees recently visited Stanley Security Solutions in Noblesville to learn about the new security system.Combs explained that the new system is an enhanced, upgraded version of the one in place at the old jail, so employees are already familiar with its basics.The current jail dates to 1986 and was designed for a population of 56. These days, the population runs from the mid-80s to the high 90s.The addition increases the number of beds to 204 and includes a new kitchen and laundry area.last_img read more

first_imgOn March 9, @shrmnextchat chatted with the SHRM Government Affairs Team about the SHRM Employment Law & Legislative Conference.  In case you missed this important chat filled with great insights about HR advocacy, you can see all the tweets here: [View the story “#Nextchat RECAP: SHRM Employment Law & Legislative Conference” on Storify]last_img

first_img The interview process is about mutual discovery—learn as much about your potential team and organization as they are learning about you. (Large preview)Question #5“What are the three pieces of your product that are most valuable but also in the most need of an update?”Why ask this?This question is all about priority and, similar to the prior question, this could be digging more into the tech stack of the product. My reason for asking actually has more to do with the “core loop” of the product. The core-loop is the dopamine hit that attracts a user and keeps them coming back to enjoy the product repeatedly.It’s akin to the food pellet that makes a rat respond to stimuli. It can also be a prime pain-point that’s a massive trigger for catastrophic system failure, and thus ultimate fear within the team. “Don’t do anything to this or our entire system could shut down.” When considering some changes to that legacy system perhaps we simply leave it alone, but we might enhance it in another way leveraging something more modern as an overlay or in a new tab or window?What follow-ups might provide more insight?What is standing in the way of doing this work?What team members could we talk to about these features?Have they done any research to understand what’s causing the behavior to be erratic or difficult to maintain?What users can we speak with about the features to understand how they’re using it?Perhaps there’s a slight tweak that could be made enabling the same outcome, but putting less stress on the system?Are there small tweaks that could be made to relieve pressure on the back-end and reduce strain on the database?How is this question received?Similar to the prior question, this can quickly get technical but it doesn’t have to. I’ve posted the question to a hiring manager who also forwarded it to a member of the product and dev teams who all gave slightly different answers. As suspected, they all provided some overlap which clearly showed what the most important problem was to work on from the business’ perspective. Don’t hesitate to ask they forward the inquiry on to someone who might be better suited or could provide a more nuanced response. Gathering broad viewpoints is a hallmark of what we designers do well.Question #6“Do you have a customer I might contact to get their thoughts about your product or service?”Why ask this?This may be the boldest question on this list, but it provides so much amazing value as an incoming designer. If we are operating as practitioners of a human-centered approach, we should be comfortable talking to users and our employer should be comfortable ensuring we have access to them. Granted, you may not yet be a member of the team, and they’re not yet your customer. But putting a willing foot forward in this area speaks confidently that you would love to get first-hand access to customer feedback.What follow-ups might provide more insight?How familiar is your team talking to their users?How often does this activity take place?Assuming this customer is a fan of the company, do we have access to users who aren’t so happy with the product?Do we ever seek feedback from someone who has canceled the service?How might the team use any insights you bring back to them?How is this question received?This question is bold and can be a bit tricky. Sometimes the team doesn’t have a good customer in mind, or even if they do, they don’t have ready access to them as customers are handled by a separate gatekeeper. At the same time, I would expect most companies to have a short-list of customers who think they’ve hung the moon. The marketing department tends to plaster their quotes all over the home page so feel free to look for that prior to the interview and ask for those contacts directly.When asking this question, I’ve also provided the questions I was intending to ask as well as the answers I got back. With free user research on the table and an opportunity for the marketing team to gain additional positive feedback asking this worked out in my favor, but that won’t always be the case. Be gracious and understand if someone’s not comfortable providing this access, but it’s a strong play in expectation setting for a human-centered design practice.Question #7“What is your dedicated budget for UX and design?”Why ask this?If the value of user experience is wrapped up solely in market research, then the company doesn’t understand a human-centered approach through their users. Market research can certainly be valuable by informing the company if a business idea might be financially viable. However, user research can guide the organization in delivering something truly valuable. This question can help a prospective designer understand that the company sees design as an investment and competitive advantage.What follow-ups might provide more insight?What percentage of your overall expenditures does this represent and why?What is the highest-titled member of the design team?What is the education budget in a given year for training or events?Has this grown, shrunk, or stayed flat compared to the prior year?What are the growth areas for the design team overall, i.e. where is the design investment focused?Research?Visual design?Copywriting?Architecture? How is this question received?This is honestly more of a leadership question, but it can be tailored to even an entry-level position. Any organization without a clear operating budget for design isn’t taking the practice seriously nor its practitioners. Product, engineering, and design are the components of a balanced team. Funding one at the behest of another is a dumpster fire and clearly communicates that the balance is out of alignment.The easiest answer I’ve been given is the salary and position I’m applying for, however, that shows a lack of foresight in terms of both growth for the team by way of headcount, as well as properly empowering designers to do their best work. HomeWeb DesignTough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Discussions during an interview. You have the floor so use it to your advantage. (Large preview)Just The BeginningThese are just a few of the types of things we could be talking about during experience or product design interviews. We certainly should care about excellent visual design and elegant UI. We should absolutely care about qualitative and quantitative analytic data and the insights they provide. We should definitely care about motion design, user flows, journey maps, design systems, microcopy, and culture fit. These are all part of the playbook of any strong, digital-design candidate. But the answers to the above topics can be incredibly impactful for the first 90 days and beyond when assuming a new design role.You may not be able to ask these questions in a face-to-face discussion, but they make a great follow-up email after an interview. Or perhaps they’re questions you keep in the back of your mind as they’ll inevitably come up in your first few months on the job. They could prove very useful to guide a longer-term, strategic vision that empowers you to improve the business by crafting glorious engagement with both your teams and your customers.Does Asking These Things Actually Help Get The Job?I’ve been asked if these questions were helpful in landing a better job and truthfully, I don’t know. I did find a very rewarding new position as a Principal Product Designer, and I used these questions throughout the interview process. After I was hired, I spoke to a couple of folks who were part of that process, and they mentioned the questions, so they were at least memorable.The entire line of questioning has also resulted in the opportunity to co-author a book around using design to address organizational change and reconsidering how the field of experience design is currently defined. I would posit both of these opportunities were impacted in some way by these thought-provoking questions, even if the projects have yet to be fully realized (we are just starting work on the book, but it’s a very exciting concept).I also used the questions in interviews with several different companies and ultimately, I was able to entertain multiple offers. Through each interview using these questions allowed me deeper insights about the organization than I would have had otherwise. Did the questions directly help me get the position? Of that I’m unsure, but they were absolutely beneficial for both my own awareness and for the team I eventually joined.Final ThoughtsApproaching the job interview process more like a researcher gave me a very different perspective on the process. Interviewing can be a stressful event, but it can also be a mutual glimpse into a shared future. Any prospective employer is inviting a designer to embark on a life journey with them — or at least a year or two — and the interview is where the two parties really start to get to know one another. The answers to these questions can help paint a more transparent picture of the shared road ahead for both the designer and the teams they might partner with.Let me know your thoughts in the comments, and whether you have other tough questions you’ve asked during interviews. I would love to know how they’ve been received and continue adding to my own list!Further Reading“How You Can Find A Design Job You Will Truly Love,” Susie Pollasky“Facebook Changes Its ‘Move Fast and Break Things’ Motto,” Samantha Murphy, Mashable“Sprints & Milestones” podcast by Brett Harned and Greg Storey“Playbook” offers career advice for designers via crowdsourced Q&A“Dear Design Student” is a collab from some amazing industry veterans providing wisdom to up-and-coming design talent. #invaluable Interviewing is a great opportunity to get to know the company, take notes! (Large preview)Interviewing Like A ResearcherThe following is a list of questions that can assist in your evaluation of a prospective employer and provide invaluable insight into their organizational maturity in the digital product space. All of these questions can help to paint a more holistic and honest picture of the design process as well as the value that a talented designer might bring to an organization. Below I’ll share questions I’ve asked, as well as their intent, along with some responses I’ve received from prospective employers. Let’s dive in.Question #1“What are the three biggest challenges facing your business over the next six months? What about the six months after that?”Why ask this?This is on the ground information for any designer. Upcoming challenges should be readily apparent for anyone on the existing team, and they’re already considering how the person being interviewed might help solve them. Framing the question in this way can provide valuable insight into how far ahead the team is thinking and how proficient they are at planning. It also can help a designer quickly bring value and insights to the organization.What follow-ups might provide more insight?Does work exist in the pipeline that a designer can help immediately bring to the product through evaluative research?Is there a product that has been delayed based on initial feedback?What insights were learned and how can that be used to tighten cycles and quickly iterate to production?Is a project hemorrhaging funds from a past launch that didn’t grow as quickly as anticipated?Are there ideas of how to save this investment and help it become successful?How is this question received?This is honestly the easiest of any question on this list. It’s a bit of a softball as I would expect any executive, manager, or team member to have this information top-of-mind. That said, when I’ve asked the question it shows that I’m already considering the above and how I might be a positive influence quickly. I’ve consistently gotten great answers to this question, and it also allows for an open conversation on how a candidates’ particular skill set could be leveraged immediately once hired.Question #2“Should you be moving fast and breaking things or moving slow and fixing things?”Why ask this?Facebook popularized the mantra of “Move fast and break things,” in an effort to fail quickly while continuing to grow from what was learned. While fostering a culture of continual learning is enormously valuable, not all problems can be solved by creating completely new products.Continuing to cover up technical debt through a constant barrage of new features can be catastrophic. That said, many organizations are held hostage by successful products that continuously add features so much that innovation is completely stifled. It’s very helpful to understand both sides of this question and the value they can bring to a product’s design.What follow-ups might provide more insight?How comfortable is the team with the idea of shipping a rough Minimum Viable Product (MVP), to gain insights quickly?How risk-averse is the company or group or even the design team?Is the business dealing with a very fragile codebase?How frequently is tech debt refactored?How is UX debt identified and managed?How is this question received?This is a very thought-provoking question for lean/agile organizations and the most common response I’ve received has been, “That’s a really great question,” and the ever-popular “It depends.” I’ve gotten fantastic responses by asking this as it affords an honest reflection on the current state of the business. The design team likely has an opinion on whether they are moving too fast or too slow and if they should behave a bit differently.The answer doesn’t need to be a scary thing, but it should be honest and should afford some honest reflection. The best designers I’ve known appreciate hearty challenges they can dig into, and this question can provide additional clarity as to what you’re stepping into.Question #3“If you’re moving fast, why?Why ask this?Moving fast can be very exhilarating, but it may not result in productivity. To some stakeholders I’ve spoken with, the word “Agile” is synonymous with “I get my things faster.” In reality, being agile or ‘lean’ is about learning and delivering the right product or solution in the smallest way to customers. Moving fast can be very advantageous so long as it’s coupled with a willingness from design to show work that may not be perfect but is functional to the point of being usable. This is where moving fast is great; learning can be realized quickly and new product directions can be identified early. This can inform an interviewing designer on how data and research are being collected and distributed to other teams or the larger organization. Alternatively, if this isn’t happening, it could indicate a large opportunity for change or an unmitigated disaster so be on the lookout and follow-up accordingly.What follow-ups might provide more insight?Are you trying to break things and learn from failure, or just moving fast because of #things?Are you looking to gain mindshare in a new market?How is the growth being managed?How is the doubling or tripling of staff affecting team dynamics, agile health, or even the company culture?What plan is in place for documenting and disseminating learning that has been gathered?How important is this task for the organization and the work I do as a designer?How is this question received?This question and the next tend to be contingent on individual teams or parts of the company. I’ve also had it backfire a bit as it’s easy for someone to become defensive of their organizational behavior. One exuberant response I’ve heard is “We’re failing fast and failing often on our teams!” but when pressed with, “What have you learned from those failures? How has that learning been incorporated into the project and received by leadership?” responses were a bit uncomfortable. This is a massive red flag for me — honesty is tremendously important to me. Just be aware this can start to get into uncomfortable territory, but it can also speak volumes about a team or leader in how they manage their response.Question #4“If you’re moving slow, why?”Why ask this?Sites and applications are like rose bushes: if they aren’t pruned periodically they can get unruly and — eventually — downright ugly. Likewise, the continuous addition of new features to any code base without sufficient refactoring and paying down tech debt can create a very fragile product. The company may have started moving quickly to capture market share or breaking things in order to build quickly and try out changes to the tech stack.From a design perspective, the biggest experience gains aren’t necessarily from a design system or improved onboarding. The company may need to modernize the tech stack to focus on improved performance or application up-time. The team may need to make changes to their delivery mechanism providing some form of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CICD), a system where a designer can more easily implement A/B testing and better understand where the most impactful changes might be made.Most designers would likely not give a second thought to the state of the tech stack because that’s an ‘engineering problem’, amirite? However, getting an up-front look at the state of the product from a technical perspective is immeasurably valuable, even to design.Understanding where the company is in upgrading their systems, what frameworks are being used, and how willing they are to invest in the infrastructure of a legacy product provides a glimpse into the company or team priorities.What follow-ups might provide more insight?Which parts of the site/application/product are least-effective?Should they be retired or reinvested in?How might these upgrades impact day-to-day work?Are new features being prioritized into the new product development so we can phase out aging systems?How will these changes impact customers?Can they still get their jobs done in the new system or are they going to be retired?How is that being communicated to users?Has there been any communication around sunsetting these retiring systems to lessen the burden?Has any analysis been done to understand how much revenue is provided by those users whose features are about to come to an end?How is this question received?This line of questioning has typically been handled offline as managers I’ve spoken to didn’t have the answers handy. They were typically fielded by an IT or Dev manager, who was more than happy to see that level of interest from a designer. As a designer, I don’t need to understand the details of my team’s API end-points, but I should understand something about the health of my digital product. Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking DesignerYou are here:center_img Posted on 26th September 2018Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share (mb, ra, yk, il)From our sponsors: Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Tough Interview(er) Questions For The Job-Seeking Designer Joshua Bullock 2018-09-26T13:30:31+02:00 2018-09-26T12:29:21+00:00Whether you’re a multi-year veteran to the UX industry or fresh out of a higher education or boot camp style program, setting out into the job market can be a daunting task for any designer. From freelancing or working for a more boutique studio, doing agency work, or joining the enterprise, a myriad of positions, requirements, and organizations are available for a design practitioner who is looking to take the next steps in their career.In this article, I’ll present a list of questions from my personal experience to consider leading up to and even during the interview process. I’ll also include the goal when asking the questions, basically what you’re trying to learn, along with responses I’ve received when asking them of prospective employers.As with anything, your mileage might vary, but considering these topics before an interview may help you better solidify the perspective on what you are looking for from your next position. It is written primarily from the position of an interviewee, however hiring managers may also find them valuable by looking at their company through that lens and considering them for prospective designers.Recommended reading: The Missing Advice I Needed When Starting My CareerUnderstanding Design MaturityJared Spool and other UX leaders have written a few things about the design maturity of organizations and the ideal distribution of design resources. When considering taking a design position within an organization, how might we look at the company through this lens and better understand where they are on their experience journey? With numerous titles being thrown around (Experience Designer, Product Designer, UI Designer, Interaction Designer, UX Designer, and so on), what might provide additional clarity for the working relationship you’re about to enter into and the role you are about to assume?Having a few years in various design roles, I’ve spent time on both sides of the interview table — both as a hiring manager and as a prospective employee. In every interview I’ve been a part of, be it part of the hiring team or as an interviewee, an opportunity was presented to inquire about the team or organization. “Do you have any questions for us?” is the most common phrase I’ve heard and this presents a golden opportunity to dig deep and gain valuable insights into the dynamics of the team and organization you’re speaking with.Meet SmashingConf New York 2018 (Oct 23–24), focused on real challenges and real front-end solutions in the real world. From progressive web apps, Webpack and HTTP/2 to serverless, Vue.js and Nuxt — all the way to inclusive design, branding and machine learning. With Sarah Drasner, Sara Soueidan and many other speakers. Check all topics and speakers ↬When I am applying, I’m on the verge of entering into a new relationship, and to the best of ability, I want to understand where we are both headed. Just as the organization is investing in me as an individual, I am being asked for a commitment of time, energy, passion, creativity, and least of all artifacts. I would like to understand as much about my partners as possible. Given that no prenuptials exist in the working world, we may eventually part ways, and our engagement should be as profitable as possible for both sides.I’ve asked the aforementioned question many times of prospective candidates, and in some cases, the response has regrettably been completely passed over. The seemingly benign, “Do you have any questions for us?” opening affords any designer a wealth of opportunity to learn more about the company and design engagement. If design solves problems by gathering information, I propose we attend the hiring process as we would any other research effort. Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019last_img read more

first_imgFetal brain cells called astrocytes are used in studies on Alzheimer’s disease. Science advocates who attended a “listening session” on the use of fetal tissue in medical research held today by senior officials at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in Washington, D.C., say they are optimistic that they were listened to and heard. But many researchers remain concerned about reports that President Donald Trump’s administration is considering withdrawing funding for such studies, which are fiercely opposed by antiabortion advocates. “It was a very good conversation. It was not a ‘check the box’ meeting,” says Kevin Wilson, director of public policy and media relations for the American Society for Cell Biology in Bethesda, Maryland.“It was a wonderful opportunity to talk about the science,” adds Jennifer Zeitzer, director of public affairs at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), also in Bethesda. Zeitzer was accompanied by FASEB board member Patricia Morris, a reproductive biologist at The Rockefeller University in New York City.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Riccardo Cassiani-Ingoni/Science Source By Meredith WadmanNov. 16, 2018 , 5:50 PMcenter_img The meeting participants also included a representative from the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, D.C. Martin Pera, a human embryonic stem cell expert at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, attended via Skype on behalf of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, based in Skokie, Illinois. (Travel delays prevented him from attending in person.)The off-the-record, invitation-only meeting was part of a new “review” of U.S.-funded research that involves human fetal tissue, derived from elective abortions, that would otherwise be discarded. The use of such tissue is legal under a 1993 federal law. The science advocates who attended today’s meeting left HHS officials with packets of information describing the tissue’s importance in research, from studies of how the Zika virus damages fetuses to probes of HIV biology and tests of drugs against it.Groups opposed to abortion have long opposed the use of the tissue, and in September they wrote letters to HHS Secretary Alex Azar and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb urging them to defund the research. The same month, HHS announced it was launching the review, and FDA said it was canceling a contract for supplying fetal tissue to the agency.The review is being spearheaded by Brett Giroir, a physician-scientist who is assistant secretary for health, and Paula Stannard, senior counselor to Azar; both were at today’s meeting. Also present in the HHS conference room were Lawrence Tabak, principal deputy director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which funded an estimated $103 million in projects using human fetal tissue this year; and Lowell Schiller, senior counselor to Gottlieb.Fetal tissue research backers and opponents alike are watching the review process closely. Today’s meeting was one of several “listening sessions” with stakeholders that HHS has said will include abortion rights groups and ethicists, as well as academic institutions.Abortion opponents are hoping that the end result is a shutdown of U.S. funding for research using the tissue. David Prentice, research director at the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Arlington, Virginia, which opposes human fetal tissue research, applauds the review as “timely and welcome. … It’s good to see this in-depth examination of the science, bioethics, modern alternatives, and options. My hope is for those funds to go to better science.”Lawrence Goldstein, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego, who depends on human fetal tissue for his work studying Alzheimer’s disease, says he is reserving judgment on the outcome of the process. “There’s nothing wrong with review. That’s a good thing,” he says. “But I’m watchfully waiting to see whether they can do this in an objective way.”Some critics doubt the review will reach that objective result.“Azar has continually painted himself as a no-nonsense technocrat, yet he continually kowtows to antiabortion groups while ignoring the scientific and medical communities,” says Mary Alice Carter, director of Equity Forward, a New York City–based nonprofit that monitors the activity of antiabortion groups and supports human fetal tissue research.In a related development, Politico reported today that Giroir sent a letter to Representative Mark Meadows (R–NC), who opposes abortion, assuring him that HHS is “fully committed to prioritizing, expanding, and accelerating efforts to develop and implement the use of … alternatives” to fetal tissue from elective abortions.If HHS did decide to halt funding for human fetal tissue research, it is unclear whether the ban would apply to research grants that agencies have already awarded. Eight years ago, after a federal judge ruled that federally funded human embryonic stem cell research was illegal, in-house NIH projects were halted for 19 days, as were as reviews of new extramural proposals and pending grant payments. But NIH funds that had already been disbursed to extramural researchers were not affected.And 4 years ago, when the federal government paused a controversial type of influenza research known as “gain of function” experiments, officials halted new grants but asked only for a “voluntary pause” on ongoing projects.With reporting by Jocelyn Kaiser. Research groups attend HHS ‘listening session’ on fetal tissue research amid funding fearslast_img read more

first_imgTamim Iqbal scored 95 to steer Bangladesh’s largest successful run chase in one-day international cricket as they beat Scotland by six wickets to keep alive their quarterfinal chances at the World Cup.Scotland set Bangladesh 319 to win Thursday after posting 318 for 8, an innings built around a record-breaking 156 of opener Kyle Coetzer. Iqbal’s innings of 95 from 100 balls, which was the highest by a Bangladesh batsman in a World Cup match, and his partnership of 139 with Mohammad Mahmudullah (62) established the strong pace that was necessary for Bangladesh to achieve the target with 11 balls to spare.Iqbal was out in the 32nd over when Bangladesh were 201 for 3, leaving a lot of work still to do, but he had cleared the way: Bangladesh were 191 for 2 after 30 overs where Scotland had been 152 for 3. Mushfiqur Rahim then spurred the Bangladesh chase, which was the second-highest successful run chase in World Cup history, scoring 60 from 42 balls.Bangladesh were a batsman down after regular opener Anamul Haque dislocated a shoulder while fielding and that made a solid and fast-paced start essential if it was to run down Scotland’s demanding total. When Rahim was out, with 72 runs still required, Shakib Al Hasan made an unbeaten 52 and Sabbir Rahman added 42 in an unbroken stand for the fifth wicket to guide Bangladesh to their second win at the tournament.Bangladesh have now beaten Afghanistan and Scotland and shared points with Australia in a washed-out match to take five points and stake a strong claim for a place in the tournament quarterfinals. But it has tough matches remaining against England and New Zealand and may have to win one of those games to ensure their progress.advertisement”Our bowlers haven’t bowled well but the good thing is the batters got runs, especially with a big match (against England) coming up,” Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza said. “We still have two chances. We will try our level best against England, if not against New Zealand.”The Scottish squad was disheartened to have lost in a match in which it set so many team milestones.Coetzer compiled the first century for Scotland in a World Cup match and his 156 – his second ODI hundred – was the second-highest individual total for Scotland in all ODIs, and the highest score by a batsman from an associate – or second-tier – team in World Cup matches.He reached his century from 103 balls, eclipsing the previous-highest score for Scotland in a World Cup match which stood at 76. Scotland had confidence of defending their total to achieve their first-ever World Cup win but the Bangladesh run chase was too skilfully managed.”It’s very tough to take,” Scotland captain Preson Mommsen said. “We did a lot of things right today but unfortunately we couldn’t put the full package together.”Unfortunately, we just couldn’t create enough chances to get 10 wickets.”Coetzer swelled the Scotland total in partnerships of 78 for the third wicket with Matt Machan (35) and 139 for the fourth wicket with Mommsen (39). Scotland’s total was their third highest in ODIs, their highest against a top-tier nation, and marked only the third occasion they have surprassed 300.last_img read more

first_imgJokic, Serbia boot Gilas Pilipinas out of contention in Fiba World Cup Foot fetish: Nibbles a specialty at Indonesian restaurant “I think they are going to end up playing in the finals and maybe even winning the whole thing.”Guiao devised every defensive plan he could think of, goaded his players as much as he can, and still came up way, way short in what could go down as the worst whipping taken by any team in this 32-country event.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPH women’s football team not spared from SEA Games hotel woesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsSPORTSThailand claims not enough Thai food, drinks for players at hotel“They are just too big, too good. They are just a tough match-up for us no matter what we do,” Guiao went on in describing the Serbs. “They’re simply at a different level.”Guiao and his Nationals are now left to pick up the pieces of what has turned out to be a disastrous campaign, having lost their first two games by an average of 52.5 points, the first being a 108-62 ripping at the hands of Italy. LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ NorthPort forces rubber match, blasts No. 1 NLEX Manila’s hidden reservoir to re-emerge as tourist draw Gilas plays Angola Wednesday afternoon for bragging rights of not being left as the only winless team in Group D.Guiao, among his concerns, is worried about one thing.“It would be hard to prop up the team’s spirits after losses like those,” he said.But knowing Guiao—even after he sounded so overwhelmed by what has just happened—he always finds a way.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Malasakit Center bill awaits Duterte signature Photo from Fiba.comFOSHAN, China—In his well-documented coaching career, and the entire country can attest to this, Yeng Guiao has never spoken this defeated before.“There’s really no way we can match up with their talent, with their size, and of course, Serbia is a special team at this point,” Guiao told Filipino scribes here, minutes after his Gilas Pilipinas crew bombed out of contention after taking a 126-67 beating flush on the chin Monday night.ADVERTISEMENT Women’s football teams served just egg, kikiam and rice for breakfast Kim Chiu rushed to ER after getting bitten by dog in BGC Singapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics ‘City-killer’: Asteroid the size of the Great Pyramid may hit Earth in 2022, says NASA View commentslast_img read more