Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials

center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Transparency as a function of material skin depth. (a) The effective index of a square array of nanocylinders, composed of aluminum, gold, silver, and titanium. Inset: the skin depth of each metal, calculated using the Lorentz–Drude model of permittivity. (b) At a fixed wavelength, it is the ratio of the particle diameter to the skin depth of the metal that determines whether the particles behave as quasi-static dipoles or perfect conductors. The effective index is remarkably constant for d ≲ δs. Credit: Nature Communications, doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09939-8 An illustration of how metals, dielectrics, and effective dielectrics respond to a slowly varying electric field. Within in each system, the applied field is opposed by an induced electric field generated by the buildup of surface charges. (a) In metals, the electrons are free to move until the applied and induced fields cancel in the bulk. In dielectrics (b) and effective dielectrics (c), the surface charge is generated by the polarization of the (meta-)atoms or (meta-)molecules, and the induced field is weaker than the applied field. Credit: Nature Communications, doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09939-8 Journal information: Nature Communications The scientists then compared different types of metals (aluminum, silver, gold and titanium) to show that materials with longer skin depths produced the most transparent and least dispersive nanoparticle arrays. Palmer et al. showed that at a fixed wavelength, the ratio of the particle diameter to the skin depth of the metal determined if the particle would behave as quasiparticle dipoles or as perfect conductors. In addition to high transparency, the scientists could tune the system by controlling the size, shape and space of the particles. For instance, Palmer et al. controlled the aspect ratio of arrays of elliptical cylinders to show that the anisotropic response of the material could be tuned. The numerical results showed that the effective index could be easily tuned to vary by more than 50 percent when the system was rotated. Thereby the scientists were able to tune the effective index by fixing the particle positions and tuning their sizes. Scientists can tune the local refractive indices of such materials by altering the size, shape and spacing of nanoparticles to design gradient-index lenses that guide and focus light on the microscale. The electric field can be strongly concentrated in the gaps between metallic nanoparticles for the simultaneous focusing and ‘squeezing’ of the dielectric field to produce strong, doubly enhanced hotspots. Scientists can use these hotspots to boost measurements made using infrared spectroscopy and other non-linear processes across a broad frequency range. In a recent study now published in Nature Communications, Samuel J. Palmer and an interdisciplinary research team in the departments of Physics, Mathematics and Nanotechnology in the U.K., Spain and Germany, showed that artificial dielectrics can remain highly transparent to infrared radiation and observed this outcome even when the particles were nanoscopic. They demonstrated the electric field penetrates the particles (rendering them imperfect for conduction) for strong interactions to occur between them in a tightly packed arrangement. The results will allow materials scientists to design optical components that are achromatic for applications in the mid-to-infrared wavelength region. Palmer and colleagues were able to tune the local refractive index of these components by altering the size, shape and spacing of nanoparticles with sensitivity to the local refractive index of the surrounding environment. The scientists enhanced the electric field in the gaps between the metallic nanoparticles in the array and simultaneously exploited their transparency, tunability and high metallic filling fraction to design a gradient-index lens. The work focused light on the microscale and squeezed the electric field in the nanoscale to produce the doubly enhanced electric field hotspot throughout the infrared (IR) region. The scientists envision that the new work will boost measurements made using IR spectroscopy and other nonlinear processes across a broad-range of frequencies. , Optics Express More information: Samuel J. Palmer et al. Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials, Nature Communications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09939-8 J. B. Pendry et al. Extremely Low Frequency Plasmons in Metallic Mesostructures, Physical Review Letters (2002). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.76.4773 D. R. Smith. Metamaterials and Negative Refractive Index, Science (2004). DOI: 10.1126/science.1096796 Seungwoo Lee. Colloidal superlattices for unnaturally high-index metamaterials at broadband optical frequencies, Optics Express (2015). DOI: 10.1364/OE.23.028170 Tiny particles with varied shapes scatter light in useful and unusual ways To highlight this potential to tune the local effective index, Palmer et al. then constructed a gradient-index (GRIN) lens using triangular lattices of gold cylinders and varied the diameters of the cylinders with position. Using the GRIN lens, the scientists were able to simultaneously focus light on the microscale and then ‘squeeze’ light on the nanoscale to produce the intense, ‘doubly enhanced’ electric field hotspots. Unlike plasmonic enhancements, the effect did not rely on lossy resonances, demonstrating broadband and low-loss properties. They showed that the focal point of the GRIN lens had to coincide with the region of closest packing to maximize squeezing of the electric field. Unlike magnetic fields that were continuous across the air-metal interfaces in the study, the electric field strongly localized in the gaps. As a result, squeezing a 2 µm wavelength into 2 nm gaps produced strong hotspots of high intensity in the study.In this way, Palmer et al. constructed low-loss, effective dielectrics from arrays of metallic nanoparticles. The scientists obtained highly transparent arrays that exceeded the transparency of real dielectrics such as germanium; renowned for their transparency to low energy radiation. They were also able to locally tune and control the size, shape and space of the particles forming the new metamaterials. The scientists showed the effective index to be essentially constant for all wavelengths greater than 2 µm. This work will allow materials scientists to design and engineer sophisticated optical devices with metamaterials that guide or enhance light across a broad range of frequencies, essentially without an upper bound on wavelength.last_img

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